Current issue: 53(4)

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Silva Fennica 1926-1997
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1960-1969
Acta Forestalia Fennica
1953-1968
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1913-1932

Articles by Jonny Andersson

Category: Research article

article id 428, category Research article
Jonny Andersson, Lars Eliasson. (2004). Effects of three harvesting work methods on Harwarder productivity in final felling. Silva Fennica vol. 38 no. 2 article id 428. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.428
During the last ten years interest in the harwarder has increased, however, studies have concentrated on effects of technical improvements on machine productivity. It has been noted that there is a large potential to increase the productivity through development of suitable work methods. To find efficient work patterns for a harwarder with a turnable loading area, three different harvesting methods were studied in final felling. Three work methods were used. Method 1: the harwarder drove backwards into the stand making a strip road, strip road trees were felled and left on the ground, on the way out of the stand the harwarder cut and processed the trees on both sides of the machine directly into the loading area. Method 2: the harwarder drove forward along the edge of the cut, cutting and processing trees directly into the loading area. Method 3: the harwarder drove forward into the stand and cut and processed strip road trees and trees standing on both sides of the machine directly into the loading area. The most efficient work method was method 2 where the productivity was 13.0 m3 u.b. per E0h (cubic metre under bark per effective hour). The productivities for method 1 and 3 were 12.1 and 11.9 m3 u.b. per E0h, respectively. In addition to work method harwarder productivity was shown to be dependent on load volume, average tree size and hauling distance. The only work elements significantly affected by work methods were processing and movement during processing. The operator had only a few weeks to get used to the machine and even less time to practise on the work methods. Thus, it is probable that the productivity for the studied methods will increase with increasing work experience. Furthermore, as only three work methods were studied, there are still untested work methods. The potential to further improve harwarder work methods is considerable.
  • Andersson, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Silviculture, S-901 83 Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Eliasson, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Silviculture, S-901 83 Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: lars.eliasson@ssko.slu.se (email)

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