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Silva Fennica 1926-1997
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Articles by Karl Stampfer

Category: Research article

article id 10178, category Research article
Franz Holzleitner, Magdalena Langmaier, Eduard Hochbichler, Bernhardt Obermayer, Karl Stampfer, Christian Kanzian. (2019). Effect of prior tree marking, thinning method and topping diameter on harvester performance in a first thinning operation – a field experiment. Silva Fennica vol. 53 no. 3 article id 10178. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.10178
Highlights: No effect on harvester performance due to prior tree marking detected; Operator selection versus prior tree marking was assessed; Operator could apply two different thinning methods; Prior tree marking seems to have a positive effect on residual stand damage.

The effect of harvester operator tree selection or prior tree marking in thinning operations on satisfactory results and performance has been widely discussed. In harvester operator tree selection, the machine operator decides on the fly which trees are selected to remain or cut. The objective of the study was to analyze the effect of prior tree marking, thinning method and topping diameter on harvester performance in low-diameter thinning operations. The entire thinning operation was captured using video technology. Overall, 2.36 ha divided into 48 plots with 5202 trees were thinned with an average diameter at breast height (dbh) over bark for all plots of between 12.5 and 14.7 cm. In total, 3122 trees were harvested, resulting in 60% removal of stem number over all plots. The harvester achieved a mean productivity of 7.38 m3 PMH0–1 with 1.48 m3 PMH0–1 SEM, with stem volume having the major influence on harvesting productivity. Prior tree marking, topping and thinning method did not significantly affect productivity. Without prior tree marking by the foresters, harvesting removal was shifted toward lower diameters. Within the unmarked plots, 7.0% of the residual trees were damaged compared with 3.2% in marked plots.

  • Holzleitner, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, Institute of Forest Engineering, Peter-Jordan-Straße 82/3, A-1190 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8489-3050 E-mail: franz.holzleitner@boku.ac.at (email)
  • Langmaier, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, Institute of Silviculture, Peter-Jordan-Straße 82/3, A-1190 Vienna, Austria; Austrian Research Centre for Forests, Department of Forest Growth and Silviculture, Seckendorff Gudent Weg 8, A-1130 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail: magdalena.langmaier@bfw.gv.at
  • Hochbichler, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, Institute of Silviculture, Peter-Jordan-Straße 82/3, A-1190 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail: eduard.hochbichler@boku.ac.at
  • Obermayer, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, Institute of Forest Engineering, Peter-Jordan-Straße 82/3, A-1190 Vienna, Austria; Agricultural Technical School of Pyhra, Kyrnbergstraße 4, A-3143 Pyhra, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail: bernhardt.obermayer@lfs-pyhra.ac.at
  • Stampfer, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, Institute of Forest Engineering, Peter-Jordan-Straße 82/3, A-1190 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-9350-2859 E-mail: karl.stampfer@boku.ac.at
  • Kanzian, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, Institute of Forest Engineering, Peter-Jordan-Straße 82/3, A-1190 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-1198-9788 E-mail: christian.kanzian@boku.ac.at
article id 1428, category Research article
Gernot Erber, Franz Holzleitner, Maximilian Kastner, Karl Stampfer. (2016). Effect of multi-tree handling and tree-size on harvester performance in small-diameter hardwood thinnings. Silva Fennica vol. 50 no. 1 article id 1428. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1428
Highlights: Harvesting with the accumulating energy wood head EF28 was studied under small tree dimension (8 dm3) in hardwood thinnings; Reasonable productivity was achieved; Maximum achieved cutting diameter in hornbeam stand was 23 cm and 15% lower than in softwood stands; Head has potential under such conditions.

Early thinnings are laborious and costly. Thus forest companies are searching for cost and time efficient ways to carry out this task. The study’s purpose was to determine the productivity of the EF28 accumulating energy wood harvesting head in harvesting small-diameter hornbeam (Carpinus betulus L.) undergrowth trees and evaluate the effect of its multi-tree handling (MTH) capacity on time consumption. The harvester was a wheeled, three-axle Komatsu 911. A time study of 7.1 hours on 19 plots, with a total area of 0.76 ha was conducted. On average, the harvested tree volume was 8 dm³ and the stand density was 2666 trees/ha. The productivity was modelled with MTH conduction, mean diameter at breast height and the number of trees handled per cycle as independent variables. On average, MTH took 27% longer per cycle, increased extracted volume per cycle by 33% and consequently increased productivity with 5.0%. In 71.9% of the cycles more than one tree was handled and if so, dimensions were smaller than in single-tree handling (5.8 cm vs. 12.0 cm). Maximum felling diameter of 23 cm was about 15% smaller than in softwood (according to the manufacturer’s specifications) and the driver didn’t exploit the EF28’s theoretical potential in terms of trees handled per cycle. It can be concluded that the head could significantly improve productivity in small-diameter wood procurement.

  • Erber, Addresses University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, Institute of Forest Engineering, Peter-Jordan Straße 82/3, A-1190 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail: gernot.erber@boku.ac.at (email)
  • Holzleitner, Addresses University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, Institute of Forest Engineering, Peter-Jordan Straße 82/3, A-1190 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail: franz.holzleitner@boku.ac.at
  • Kastner, Addresses University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, Institute of Forest Engineering, Peter-Jordan Straße 82/3, A-1190 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail: maximilian.kastner@boku.ac.at
  • Stampfer, Addresses University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, Institute of Forest Engineering, Peter-Jordan Straße 82/3, A-1190 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail: karl.stampfer@boku.ac.at
article id 984, category Research article
Christian Rottensteiner, Petros Tsioras, Heinz Neumayer, Karl Stampfer. (2013). Vibration and noise assessment of tractor-trailer and truck-mounted chippers. Silva Fennica vol. 47 no. 5 article id 984. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.984
Highlights: Truck-mounted chippers were associated with higher vibration values, while tractor-trailer chippers had higher noise level; Chipping hardwood produced higher vibration magnitudes than softwood; Vibration and noise values in most cases did not exceed the exposure limit values set by the European Union.
During chipping, machine operators are exposed to whole-body vibration and noise bearing a risk to health. Vibration on the operator’s seat and noise inside the chipper cab was measured and analyzed. The factorial design considered two setup variants (tractor-trailer and truck-mounted) of two chipper models from different manufacturers during chipping of softwood and hardwood tree species. Furthermore, exposure to noise was measured during chipping of hardwood. Vibration and noise during chipping, driving between wood piles, and operational delays were measured separately. The results associated truck-mounted chippers with higher vibration values and tractor-trailer chippers with higher noise levels. The highest vibration levels were recorded while driving on the forest road from one log pile to another and the second highest during chipping. On the contrary, the lowest vibration levels were measured during operational delays with the chipper in idling condition. Chipping hardwood produced higher vibration magnitudes than softwood. Exposure to noise was significantly higher during chipping compared to driving and operational delays. Vibration and noise data were combined with time studies data, for the calculation of eight-hour energy equivalent total values, both for vibration and noise. In all cases, the exposure limit values set by the European Union were not exceeded, with the exception of truck-mounted chippers, which are likely to exceed the exposure action value for vibration.
  • Rottensteiner, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Institute of Forest Engineering, Peter Jordan Straße 82, 1190 Wien, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail: christian.rottensteiner@boku.ac.at (email)
  • Tsioras, Aristotle University, P.O. Box 227, GR-541 24 Thessaloniki, Greece ORCID ID:E-mail: ptsioras@for.auth.gr
  • Neumayer, Specialist in Occupational Medicine, Wörndlestraße 10, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail: heinz.neumayer@die-arbeitsmedizin.at
  • Stampfer, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Institute of Forest Engineering, Peter Jordan Straße 82, 1190 Wien, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail: karl.stampfer@boku.ac.at
article id 910, category Research article
Gernot Erber, Christian Kanzian, Karl Stampfer. (2012). Predicting moisture content in a pine logwood pile for energy purposes. Silva Fennica vol. 46 no. 4 article id 910. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.910
Determining the moisture content of naturally dried fuel stock without frequent measuring is a problem still unsolved. Modelling moisture content based on automatically captured meteorological data could provide a solution. An accurate model would allow the drying period and the point of chipping to be optimised. For the experimental study, a metal frame supported by load sensors and loaded with 17 tons of logwood was set up next to a meteorological station. A multiple linear regression model was used to link meteorological and load data to provide a formula for determining the moisture content. The pile dried for a period of 14 months (average temperature of 7.3 °C, a humidity of 81%, and 777 mm of rainfall). The overall moisture content dropped from 50.1% to 32.2%. The regression model, which based on daily means and sums of meteorological parameters, provided a mean deviance from the observed curve of –0.51%±0.71% within the period of investigation. Relative humidity was found to be most important parameter in drying. Increased moisture content resulting from rainfall greater than 30 mm per day reverted back to pre-rainfall values within two to three days, if no other rainfall events followed. Covering the pile would have a positive effect on the drying performance. In terms of economic benefit it could be shown that natural drying is beneficial. Overall this study shows that meteorological data used in site specific drying models can adequately predict the moisture content of naturally dried logwood.
  • Erber, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Peter Jordan-Strasse 82, 1190 Wien, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail: gernot.erber@boku.ac.at (email)
  • Kanzian, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Peter Jordan-Strasse 82, 1190 Wien, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail: christian.kanzian@boku.ac.at
  • Stampfer, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Peter Jordan-Strasse 82, 1190 Wien, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail: karl.stampfer@boku.ac.at
article id 464, category Research article
Christian Kanzian, Franz Holzleitner, Karl Stampfer, Sarah Ashton. (2009). Regional energy wood logistics – optimizing local fuel supply. Silva Fennica vol. 43 no. 1 article id 464. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.464
The promotion of electric energy production from solid biomass by the Austrian government has lead to a boom in the construction of new combined heat and power plants. The current total demand for wood chips in the research area for energy purposes is 70 400 m3 of loose volume chips per year. The expected increase in demand due to these new plants is more than 4 times greater than current demand: up to 302 700 m3 of loose volume per year. Even if the energy wood feedstock potential is satisfactory, the design of the supply chain is still unresolved. The aim of this study is to give decision-makers a base for further development. To accomplish this, we designed and tested four different supply scenarios: one for 9 plants and one for 16 plants. The scenarios were developed using a combination of geographic information systems (GIS) and linear programming methods. The results indicate that direct transport of solid fuel wood as round wood and chipping at the plant is the cheapest supply system with a resulting cost of 5.6–6.6 EUR/m3 loose. Using harvesting residues can only be recommended for large plants because of poor fuel quality. In this case, residues would be chipped at or near the landing, piled and transported via self-loading trucks at a cost between 8.4 and 9.1 EUR/m3 loose. In order to meet increasing demand and to ensure a continuous supply, especially during the winter and spring seasons it is necessary to optimize the supply chain by including storage terminals. However, using terminals and increased demand both lead to higher logistical costs. For example, if the total volume is handled via terminals, the average supply costs including storage will increase by 26%. Higher demand increases the costs by 24%.
  • Kanzian, University of Applied Life Sciences Vienna, Institute of Forest Engineering, Peter Jordan Strasse 82, A-1190 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail: christian.kanzian@boku.ac.at (email)
  • Holzleitner, University of Applied Life Sciences Vienna, Institute of Forest Engineering, Peter Jordan Strasse 82, A-1190 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Stampfer, University of Applied Life Sciences Vienna, Institute of Forest Engineering, Peter Jordan Strasse 82, A-1190 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Ashton, Southern Regional Extension Forestry, Forestry Bldg. 4-420, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA ORCID ID:E-mail:

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