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Silva Fennica 1926-1997
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Articles by Peter Rauch

Category: Research article

article id 1217, category Research article
Ulrich J. Wolfsmayr, Peter Rauch. (2014). Primary forest fuel supply chain: assessing barriers and drivers for the modal shift from truck to train. Silva Fennica vol. 48 no. 5 article id 1217. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1217
Highlights: For combined heat and power plants in Austria procuring forest fuels, the most competitive transport mode is road transport using walking-floor trucks; The main barriers for a modal shift are the plant managers’ negative experiences with the railroad; Rail transport has its benefits, when high volumes are needed and transport distances are long.
Multimodal primary forest fuel (PFF) transport using the railroad for main haulage has been quite uncommon to present, although it could provide considerable advantages in terms of economical, ecological and social parameters. Accordingly, the objective of this paper is to assess barriers and drivers for the modal shift from truck to train. As methodological tool, we are using the concept of Quality Function Deployment (QFD) with the House of Quality (HoQ) – an approach that has not been used in forest management so far. As the most important barriers for the modal shift from truck to train in PFF transport in Austria, the following were identified: (i) bioenergy plant managers have a negative opinion and negative experience regarding the railroad in terms of high prices, a lot of bureaucracy, etc.; (ii) absence of rail sidings or relatively short rail sidings not suitable for block trains; and (iii) unwillingness to invest in new supply or unloading systems. On the contrary, the most important drivers for a modal shift are: (i) multimodal PFF supply chains using trains can provide high volumes; (ii) increasing catchment areas for larger CHP plants result in increasing transport distances; and (iii) rail transport has less negative environmental and social impact than road transport.
  • Wolfsmayr, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Gregor Mendel Straße 33, A-1180 Wien, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail: ulrich.wolfsmayr@boku.ac.at (email)
  • Rauch, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Gregor Mendel Straße 33, A-1180 Wien, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail: peter.rauch@boku.ac.at
article id 267, category Research article
Manfred Gronalt, Peter Rauch. (2008). Vendor managed inventory in wood processing industries – a case study. Silva Fennica vol. 42 no. 1 article id 267. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.267
Solid structure timber (SST) is an important building material in the wood construction business, in which its production volume is largely related to that respective business. Due to the large variability in the demand and seasonal factors, SST producers’ inventories are likely to be simultaneously overstocked for one type of timber and out of stock of another. An inventory policy that ensures a high service level and relatively low stocks is required. In the present paper, we propose the vendor managed inventory (VMI) approach for controlling the stock of deals that are produced at a sawmill and delivered as raw material for SST-production. We evaluate two VMI implementations against the actual inventory management for three different market scenarios. Furthermore, we layout the necessities for reconfiguring the business processes, and subsequently set up an organisational framework within VMI, which is indeed applicable in this segment of the woodworking industry. In our application background, VMI as an inventory control system is able to reduce the overall raw material stock by more than 37% by simultaneously increasing the SST service level.
  • Gronalt, BOKU – University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Feistmantelstr. 4, 1180 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Rauch, BOKU – University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Feistmantelstr. 4, 1180 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail: peter.rauch@boku.ac.at

Category: Review article

article id 9984, category Review article
Christoph Kogler, Peter Rauch. (2018). Discrete event simulation of multimodal and unimodal transportation in the wood supply chain: a literature review. Silva Fennica vol. 52 no. 4 article id 9984. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.9984
Highlights: Focus on discrete event simulation, wood supply chain and multimodal transport; Analyses of 12 review articles and a core of 32 research papers, complemented by 48 related ones; Research focus from unimodal to multimodal transport to build efficient, resilient, green and socially sustainable supply chains; Development of robust risk management considering supply risks, demand risks and external risks is needed.

This review systematically analyses and classifies research and review papers focusing on discrete event simulation applied to wood transport, and therefore illustrates the development of the research area from 1997 until 2017. Discrete event simulation allows complex supply chain models to be mapped in a straightforward manner to study supply chain dynamics, test alternative strategies, communicate findings and facilitate understanding of various stakeholders. The presented analyses confirm that discrete event simulation is well-suited for analyzing interconnected wood supply chain transportation issues on an operational and tactical level. Transport is the connective link between interrelated system components of the forest products industry. Therefore, a survey on transport logistics allows to analyze the significance of entire supply chain management considerations to improve the overall performance and not only one part in isolation. Thus far, research focuses mainly on biomass, unimodal truck transport and terminal operations. Common shortcomings identified include rough explanations of simulation models and sparse details provided about the verification and validation processes. Research gaps exist concerning simulations of entire, resilient and multimodal wood supply chains as well as supply and demand risks. Further studies should expand upon the few initial attempts to combine various simulation methods with optimization.

  • Kogler, Institute of Production and Logistics, Department of Economics and Social Sciences, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Feistmantelstrasse 4, A-1180 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8811-152X E-mail: christoph.kogler@boku.ac.at (email)
  • Rauch, Institute of Production and Logistics, Department of Economics and Social Sciences, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Feistmantelstrasse 4, A-1180 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5812-4415 E-mail: peter.rauch@boku.ac.at

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