Current issue: 55(1)

Under compilation: 55(2)

Scopus CiteScore 2019: 3.1
Scopus ranking of open access forestry journals: 6th
PlanS compliant
Silva Fennica 1926-1997
1990-1997
1980-1989
1970-1979
1960-1969
Acta Forestalia Fennica
1953-1968
1933-1952
1913-1932

Articles by Tapio Wall

Category: Research article

article id 10389, category Research article
Juho Matala, Harri Kilpeläinen, Henrik Heräjärvi, Tapio Wall, Erkki Verkasalo. (2020). Sawlog quality and tree dimensions of Scots pine 34 years after artificial moose browsing damage. Silva Fennica vol. 54 no. 3 article id 10389. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.10389
Highlights: The first controlled, long-term, experimental study on the tree dimensions and sawlog quality after moose damage; The trees damaged at the seedling stage had a smaller diameter, height, and tree volume at the end of the experiment; The heavier the clipping treatment, the more likely the stem form deteriorated; Deteriorated stem form and vertical branches were the most typical defects.

Moose (Alces alces L.) browsing causes severe damage in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) seedling stands. The effects of this damage on the quality of sawlogs were studied in a long-term controlled experiment. This article reports the stem size and external quality characteristics of Scots pine stems 34 years after artificial moose browsing damage. Damaging the trees by clipping the main stem at the seedling stage reduced the diameter, height, and tree volume of the trees at the end of the experiment. The tree growth reduction was dependent on the severity of clipping. The differences between the damaged and the control trees were more obvious in diameter than in height at the time of final felling. Stem form defects and vertical branches were the most typical externally detectable defects caused by clipping. Defects in the butt logs were detected in 71–89% of the damaged trees, depending on the clipping treatment severity. The stronger the clipping treatment, the more likely the stem form was defected and the more commonly were vertical branches and crooks detected in the stems. The results indicate that both tree dimensions and stem quality suffer from moose browsing. The findings of this controlled experiment more likely underestimate than overestimate the damage in comparison to real moose browsing. Further analyses are required to assess the effects of browsing damage on the internal quality of sawlogs and subsequent economic outcomes.

  • Matala, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Natural resources, Yliopistokatu 6B, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: juho.matala@luke.fi (email)
  • Kilpeläinen, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Bioeconomy and environment, Yliopistokatu 6B, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: harri.kilpelainen@luke.fi
  • Heräjärvi, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Production systems, Yliopistokatu 6B, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: henrik.herajarvi@luke.fi
  • Wall, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Research infrastructure services, Yliopistokatu 6B, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: tapio.wall@luke.fi
  • Verkasalo, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Production systems, Yliopistokatu 6B, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: erkki.verkasalo@luke.fi

Register
Click this link to register for Silva Fennica submission and tracking system.
Log in
If you are a registered user, log in to save your selected articles for later access.
Contents alert
Sign up to receive alerts of new content
Your selected articles

Committee on Publication Ethics A Trusted Community-Governed Archive