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Articles by Klaus von Gadow

Category: Research article

article id 113, category Research article
Jinsong Wang, Chunyu Zhang, Fucai Xia, Xiuhai Zhao, Lianhai Wu, Klaus von Gadow. (2011). Biomass structure and allometry of Abies nephrolepis (Maxim) in Northeast China. Silva Fennica vol. 45 no. 2 article id 113. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.113
Above- and below-ground tree biomass structure and allometric relationships of Abies nephrolepis (Maxim) were assessed in an old secondary forest dominated by A. nephrolepis, Pinus koraiensis, Quercus mongolica, Tilia amurensis, Fraxinus mandshurica and Acer mono in northeast China. Based on the breast-height diameter (D), a total of 21 sample trees were divided into three tree size classes: the small trees (1 cm ≤ D < 10 cm), the medium trees (10 cm ≤ D < 20 cm) and the big trees (D ≥ 20 cm). The greatest amount of live branch biomass was located in the middle and bottom layers of the crown, while the largest foliage biomass was found in the middle layer in each tree size category. The relative contribution of canopy biomass components (live branches and foliage) decreased with increasing tree size, while that of coarse root biomass remained almost constant. The relationship between above- and belowground biomass was linear. D and tree height (H) decreased with increasing competition intensity. The small trees had lower average crown ratio and higher average height-to-diameter ratio than those of the medium and big trees. The big trees had higher average stem to foliage mass ratio than those of the small and medium trees. Crown ratio, height-to-diameter ratio and stem to foliage mass ratio were not correlated with competition intensity in the same tree size class. Root to shoot mass ratio was almost constant among tree sizes. Allometric equations based on D gave higher correlations compared to those with other stem diameters: at tree base, at 30-cm height and at crown base.
  • Wang, Key Laboratory for Silviculture and Conservation of Ministry of Education, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing 100083, China ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Zhang, Key Laboratory for Silviculture and Conservation of Ministry of Education, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing 100083, China ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Xia, Key Laboratory for Silviculture and Conservation of Ministry of Education, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing 100083, China ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Zhao, Key Laboratory for Silviculture and Conservation of Ministry of Education, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing 100083, China ORCID ID:E-mail: zhaoxh@bjfu.edu.cn (email)
  • Wu, Rothamsted Research, Okehampton, Devon, UK ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Gadow, Faculty of Forestry and Forest Ecology, Georg-August-University Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 319, category Research article
Ulises Diéguez-Aranda, José Antonio Grandas-Arias, Juan Gabriel Álvarez-González, Klaus von Gadow. (2006). Site quality curves for birch stands in north-western Spain. Silva Fennica vol. 40 no. 4 article id 319. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.319
A model for predicting the height growth of even-aged, birch (Betula pubescens Ehrh.) dominated stands in Galicia (north-western Spain) was developed. Data from stem analysis of 214 trees were used for model construction. Two dynamic site equations derived with the generalized algebraic difference approach (GADA) were tested, which combine compatible site index and height models in one common equation. Both equations are base-age invariant and directly estimate height and site index from any height and age. The fittings were done in one stage using the base-age-invariant dummy variables method. A second-order continuous-time autoregressive error structure was used to correct the inherent autocorrelation of the longitudinal data used in this study. Cieszewski’s model best described the data. This model is therefore recommended for height growth prediction and site classification of birch stands in Galicia.
  • Diéguez-Aranda, Departamento de Ingeniería Agroforestal, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela. Escuela Politécnica Superior, Campus universitario, 27002 Lugo, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail: udieguez@lugo.usc.es (email)
  • Grandas-Arias, Departamento de Ingeniería Agroforestal, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela. Escuela Politécnica Superior, Campus universitario, 27002 Lugo, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Álvarez-González, Departamento de Ingeniería Agroforestal, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela. Escuela Politécnica Superior, Campus universitario, 27002 Lugo, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Gadow, Institut fur Waldinventur und Waldwachstum, George-Auguts-Universität Göttingen. Büsgenweg 5, D-37077 Göttingen, Germany ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 594, category Research article
Walter Zucchini, Matthias Schmidt, Klaus von Gadow. (2001). A model for the diameter-height distribution in an uneven-aged beech forest and a method to assess the fit of such models. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 2 article id 594. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.594
This paper illustrates the application of a mixture model to describe the bivariate diameter-height distribution of trees growing in a pure, uneven-aged beech forest. A mixture of two bivariate normal distributions is considered but the methodology is applicable to mixtures of other distributions. The model was fitted to diameter-height observations for 1242 beech trees in the protected forest Dreyberg (Solling, Germany). A considerable advantage of the model, apart from the fact that it happens to fit this large data set unusually well, is that the individual parameters all have familiar interpretations. The bivariate Johnson SBB distribution was also fitted to the data for the purpose of comparing the fits. A second issue discussed in this paper is concerned with the general question of assessing the fit of models for bivariate data. We show how a device called ‘pseudo-residual’ enables one to investigate the fit of a bivariate model in new ways and in considerable detail. Attractive features of pseudo-residuals include the fact that they are not difficult to interpret; they can be computed using generally available statistical software and, most important of all, they enable one to examine the fit of a model by means of simple graphs.
  • Zucchini, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Institute for Statistics and Econometrics ORCID ID:E-mail: zucchini@wi-wiss.uni-goettingen.de (email)
  • Schmidt, Forest Research Station of Lower Saxony ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Gadow, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Institute for Forest Management and Yield Sciences ORCID ID:E-mail:

Category: Review article

article id 639, category Review article
Klaus von Gadow. (2000). Evaluating risk in forest planning models. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 2 article id 639. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.639
The purpose of forest scenario modelling is to evaluate multiple management options and to answer what if questions relating to a particular development path of a given forest. Forest scenario planning can reduce uncertainty in management outcomes by anticipating the future in a systematic way, thus reducing the likelihood of unexpected events. It can also improve the chance that future developments will agree with specified objectives. Numerous techniques have been proposed for generating and evaluating scenarios of forest development. Some of the techniques are limited to applications in simple forest production systems while others are suitable for any type of forest management, including individual tree selection systems. Risk is defined as the expected loss due to a particular hazard for a given area and reference period. An expected loss may be calculated as the product of the damage and its probability. Risk analysis, risk evaluation and risk management are formal procedures for quantifying, evaluating and managing risk within a given hazard domain. Applications of risk analysis in forest scenario planning are rare and greater emphasis needs to be placed on hazard prediction. The aim of this contribution is to discuss some aspects of risk analysis, including examples of specific modelling tools. In a forest planning model risk can be considered in the form of specific constraints limiting the total risk in a given time period. Expected hazards can be used to exclude certain risky alternatives and finally, risk can be calculated and used to reduce the value of an objective function coefficient.
  • Gadow, Georg-August-University Göttingen, Institute for Forest Management, Büsgenweg 5, 37077 Göttingen, Germany ORCID ID:E-mail: kgadow@gwdg.de (email)

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