Current issue: 54(4)

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Silva Fennica 1926-1997
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1960-1969
Acta Forestalia Fennica
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1913-1932

Articles by Asaddollah Karimidoost

Category: Research article

article id 1334, category Research article
Abolfazl Daneshvar, Mulualem Tigabu, Asaddollah Karimidoost, Per Christer Oden. (2015). Single seed Near Infrared Spectroscopy discriminates viable and non-viable seeds of Juniperus polycarpos. Silva Fennica vol. 49 no. 5 article id 1334. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1334
Highlights: Near Infrared (NIR) Spectroscopy discriminates viable and non-viable (empty, insect-attacked and shriveled) seeds of J. polycarpos with 98% and 100% accuracy, respectively; The origins of spectral differences between non-viable and viable seeds were attributed to differences in seed coat chemical composition and storage reserves; The results demonstrate that NIR spectroscopy has great potential as seed sorting technology to ensure precision sowing.

A large quantity of non-viable (empty, insect-attacked and shriveled) seeds of Juniperus polycarpos (K. Koch) is often encountered during seed collection, which should be removed from the seed lots to ensure precision sowing in the nursery or out in the field. The aims of this study were to evaluate different modelling approaches and to examine the sensitivity of the change in detection system (Silicon-detector in the shorter vis-a-vis InGsAs-detector in the longer NIR regions) for discriminating non-viable seeds from viable seeds by Near Infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. NIR reflectance spectra were collected from single seeds, and discriminant models were developed by Partial Least Squares – Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) and Orthogonal Projection to Latent Structures – Discriminant Analysis (OPLS-DA) using the entire or selected NIR regions. Both modelling approaches resulted in 98% and 100% classification accuracy for viable and non-viable seeds in the test set, respectively. However, OPLS-DA models were superb in terms of model parsimony and information quality. Modelling in the shorter and longer wavelength region also resulted in similar classification accuracy, suggesting that prediction of class membership is insensitive to change in the detection system. The origins of spectral differences between non-viable and viable seeds were attributed to differences in seed coat chemical composition, mainly terpenoids that were dominant in non-viable seeds and storage reserves in viable seeds. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that NIR spectroscopy has great potential as seed sorting technology to upgrade seed lot quality that ensures precision sowing.

  • Daneshvar, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, P.O. Box 49, SE-230 53, Alnarp, Sweden; (permanent address) Department of Natural Resources, Gonbad Kavous University, Shahid Fallahi Street, P.O. Box 163, Gonbad, Iran ORCID ID:E-mail: abolfazl.daneshvar@slu.se
  • Tigabu, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, P.O. Box 49, SE-230 53, Alnarp, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: mulualem.tigabu@slu.se (email)
  • Karimidoost, Agriculture and Natural Resources Research Center of Golestan Province, Beheshti Ave. P.O. Box 4915677555, Gorgan, Iran ORCID ID:E-mail: karimidoost@yahoo.com
  • Oden, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, P.O. Box 49, SE-230 53, Alnarp, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: per.oden@slu.se

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