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Silva Fennica 1926-1997
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Articles by Pekka Kauppi

Category: Research article

article id 484, category Research article
Pekka E. Kauppi. (2003). New, low estimate for carbon stock in global forest vegetation based on inventory data. Silva Fennica vol. 37 no. 4 article id 484. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.484
Several reports by Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) have referred to published estimates ranging from 352 to 536 x 109 tons for the global pool of carbon in forest vegetation. However, a rounded estimate of 300 x 109 tons can be derived from the recent Global Forest Resources Assessment 2000 of the FAO, as shown in this paper. By comparing with independent empirical evidence as published in recent scientific literature and by considering sampling principles and the disturbance cycles of large forest regions, it is argued that the new lower estimate is more realistic. A downward correction of the estimate would make an important contribution to balancing the global carbon budget.
  • Kauppi, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), A-2361 Laxenburg, Austria. Present address: Environmental Science and Policy, Department of Limnology and Environmental Protection, PO Box 27, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: pekka.kauppi@helsinki.fi (email)

Category: Article

article id 5606, category Article
Pekka E. Kauppi, Pekka Hänninen, Helena M Henttonen, Antti Ihalainen, Eino Lappalainen, Maximilian Posch, Michael Starr, Pekka Tamminen. (1997). Carbon reservoirs in peatlands and forests in the boreal regions of Finland. Silva Fennica vol. 31 no. 1 article id 5606. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a8507

The carbon reservoir of ecosystems was estimated based on field measurements for forests and peatlands on an area in Finland covering 263,000 km2 and extending about 900 km across the boreal zone from south to north. More than two thirds of the reservoir was in peat, and less than ten per cent in trees. Forest ecosystems growing on mineral soils covering 144,000 km2 contained 10–11 kg C m-2 on an average, including both vegetation (3.4 kg C m-2) and soil (uppermost 75 cm; 7.2 kg C m-2). Mire ecosystems covering 65,000 km2 contained an average of 72 kg C m-2 as peat. For the landscape consisting of peatlands, closed and open forests, and inland water, excluding arable and built-up land, a reservoir of 24.6 kg C m-2 was observed. This includes the peat, forest soil and tree biomass. This is an underestimate of the true total reservoir, because there are additional unknown reservoirs in deep soil, lake sediments, woody debris, and ground vegetation. Geographic distributions of the reservoirs were described, analysed and discussed. The highest reservoir, 35–40 kg C m-2, was observed in sub-regions in central western and north western Finland. Many estimates given for the boreal carbon reservoirs have been higher than those of ours. Either the Finnish environment contains less carbon per unit area than the rest of the boreal zone, or the global boreal reservoir has earlier been overestimated. In order to reduce uncertainties of the global estimates, statistically representative measurements are needed especially on Russian and Canadian peatlands.

  • Kauppi, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Hänninen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Henttonen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Ihalainen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Lappalainen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Posch, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Starr, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Tamminen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 4981, category Article
Seppo Kellomäki, Pertti Hari, Pekka Kauppi, Eero Väisänen. (1977). Production of structural matter by a plant community in successional environment. Silva Fennica vol. 11 no. 4 article id 4981. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a14835

The structural matter production of selected plant species of a ground cover community was determined in relation to light available for photosynthesis. The resulting functions were applied in a situation where the light reaching the ground cover was controlled by the dynamics of the tree crown strata, and the occurrence of different plant species at different stages of succession was determined on the basis of their production of structural matter in actual light conditions. The possible strategies involved in adaptation to a successional environment have been discussed.

The PDF includes a summary in Finnish.

  • Kellomäki, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Hari, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kauppi, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Väisänen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 7632, category Article
Pekka Kauppi. (1984). Stress, strain, and injury : Scots pine transplants from lifting to acclimation on the planting site. Acta Forestalia Fennica no. 185 article id 7632. https://doi.org/10.14214/aff.7632

This paper is the final report of a study on the damage of tree transplants induced before the trees are planted in the field. The injury development is viewed as a transient rather than a ”step-like” process. The main objective of the study is to develop concepts and methods for recognizing and analysing the dynamic aspects of that process. The report consists of three parts: i) characterization of the environments to which the plants are exposed, ii) theoretical part of model development, and iii) experiments with bare-rooted Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) transplants in which the model was applied.

The results of the first part indicate fast temporal variation of the environmental stress factors, and a slow response of the plant in terms of visible injury symptoms. A model is developed in the second part of the paper for analysing the relationship between the fast stress variables and the slow injury variables. The model is employed in the third part of the study for developing experiments in which the transplants were subjected to different stress conditions. The conclusions emphasize the hazardous role of root desiccation. Similar injury development was observed over a range of different planting sites. Controlling high temperatures during the transportation and storage of the plants was introduced as an indirect method for avoiding the risk of root desiccation.

The PDF includes a summary in Finnish.

  • Kauppi, ORCID ID:E-mail:

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