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Silva Fennica vol. 52 no. 2 | 2018

Category: Research article

article id 9914, category Research article
Jun Tanabe, Futoshi Ishiguri, Akira Tamura, Yuya Takashima, Jyunichi Ohshima, Kazuya Iizuka, Shinso Yokota. (2018). Within-tree radial and among-family variations in wood density, microfibril angle, and mechanical properties in Picea glehnii. Silva Fennica vol. 52 no. 2 article id 9914. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.9914
Highlights: The modulus of elasticity was affected by both microfibril angle and wood density, whereas the modulus of rupture was mainly affected by wood density in Picea glehnii; A larger degree of among-family variation in wood properties was detected in juvenile wood than in mature wood, indicating that genetic improvements in the mechanical properties may be more effective for juvenile wood.

Genetic improvements in the mechanical properties of wood are important in forestry species used for lumber, such as Picea. The within-tree radial and among-family variations for the modulus of elasticity (MOE), modulus of rupture (MOR), and their related traits [i.e., microfibril angle (MFA) of the S2 layer in latewood tracheid and air-dry density (AD)] were evaluated in nine open-pollinated families of Picea glehnii (F. Schmidt) Mast. The radial variation in MOR was mainly affected by AD, whereas MOE was affected by MFA and AD. Higher F-values obtained by analysis of variance and coefficient of variation were observed for all properties at the 6th–15th annual ring, except for AD at the 6th–10th annual ring. This result suggests that the contribution of genetic effect is larger in these highly variable regions. In addition, positive correlation coefficients were obtained between wood properties at the 6th–15th annual ring and mean values of these properties. Therefore, genetic improvements for MOE, MOR, and their related traits in P. glehnii is likely to be more effective in juvenile wood, specifically at the 6th–15th annual ring from the pith.

  • Tanabe, Faculty of Education, Chiba University, Chiba, 263-8522, Japan ORCID ID:E-mail: tanabe_j@chiba-u.jp (email)
  • Ishiguri, Faculty of Agriculture, Utsunomiya University, Utsunomiya 321-8505, Japan ORCID ID:E-mail: ishiguri@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp
  • Tamura, Forest Tree Breeding Center, Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute, Hitachi, 319-1301, Japan ORCID ID:E-mail: akirat@affrc.go.jp
  • Takashima, Forest Tree Breeding Center, Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute, Hitachi, 319-1301, Japan ORCID ID:E-mail: ytakashima@ffpri.affrc.go.jp
  • Ohshima, Faculty of Agriculture, Utsunomiya University, Utsunomiya 321-8505, Japan ORCID ID:E-mail: joshima@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp
  • Iizuka, Faculty of Agriculture, Utsunomiya University, Utsunomiya 321-8505, Japan ORCID ID:E-mail: kiizuka@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp
  • Yokota, Faculty of Agriculture, Utsunomiya University, Utsunomiya 321-8505, Japan ORCID ID:E-mail: yokotas@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp
article id 7816, category Research article
Pentti Niemistö, Harri Kilpeläinen, Eero Poutiainen. (2018). Effect of first thinning type and age on growth, stem quality and financial performance of a Scots pine stand in Finland. Silva Fennica vol. 52 no. 2 article id 7816. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.7816
Highlights: Early commercial first thinning at the top height of 11 m with tree selection targeting high quality of remaining stems was more profitable in a Scots pine stand than thinning from below at similar time or delayed thinning 10 years later; After early first thinning only one intermediate thinning was needed, but a late thinning at age of 60 years was feasible in connection with increased amount of high quality butt logs after artificial pruning; The optimal rotation period for a Scots pine stand using a lower interest rate of 1% was 80–85 years depending on the thinning pattern. With a higher rate of 4%, the optimal rotation took only 60 years.

The objective of the study was to ascertain the effects of tree selection (thinning from below, from above and according to stem quality) and timing of first commercial thinning (early and delayed) on the growth, yield and quality of trees in a Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stand. A long-term field experiment (25 years) was measured in 5-year periods and the further development was simulated with growth and yield models to final cuttings using alternative rotation periods of 55–85 years. The measurements included also the exact location and type of technical defects detected on all trees in the experimental plots. The measured volume increment per unit area during the study period, 25 years after the early thinning stage was the lowest in the plots thinned from below, and the highest in the plots thinned from above or in the delayed thinning plots. However, the largest volume of saw logs during the whole rotation of 80 years was yielded after early first thinning according to the quality. The largest volume of very high-quality butt logs was produced by pruning connected with early thinning from above, and a smaller volume after early thinning according to stem quality but no after thinning from below or delayed first thinning. Without pruning an early quality thinning with one intermediate thinning was the most profitable thinning treatment in the Scots pine stand regardless the rotation length or the interest rate used. By interest rates of 1% and 2%, the optimal rotations were 80–85 years and 70 years respectively. A late thinning at the age of 60 year with long rotation was profitable only for the pruned pine stands with a low interest rate.

  • Niemistö, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Natural resources, Kampusranta 9 C, FI-60320 Seinäjoki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: pentti.niemisto@luke.fi (email)
  • Kilpeläinen, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Production systems, Yliopistokatu 6, FI-80100 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: harri.kilpelainen@luke.fi
  • Poutiainen, Oulu ORCID ID:E-mail: eero1.poutiainen@dnainternet.net

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