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Silva Fennica vol. 41 no. 4 | 2007

Category: Research article

article id 469, category Research article
Henri Vanhanen, Timo O. Veteli, Sonja Päivinen, Seppo Kellomäki & Pekka Niemelä. (2007). Climate change and range shifts in two insect defoliators: gypsy moth and nun moth – a model study. Silva Fennica vol. 41 no. 4 article id 469. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.469
Environmental factors influenced by global climate change determine the distribution ranges of organisms. Especially ectothermic animals are expected to shift their distribution ranges northwards in the next hundred years or so. In this study simulations made with CLIMEX-modelling software were used to predict the future distribution ranges of two Central European serious forest pest species: the nun moth (Lymantria monacha L. (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae)) and the gypsy moth (L. dispar L). The software calculates an ecoclimatic index based on the life cycle requirements of a species and thus represents the probability of a viable population to exist at a certain location. Three different climate warming scenarios were considered: temperature increase of 1.4, 3.6 and 5.8°C. Simulations generated with the current climate conditions corresponded well to the current distributions of the species. The climate warming scenarios shifted the northern boundary of the distribution for both of these species north by c. a. 500–700 km. Also the southern edge of the ranges retracted northwards by 100–900 km. The results of this study are in agreement with the results of empirical studies on other species. Being serious pest species, these species pose a potential threat to silviculture and therefore, have to be considered in the planning of forest management practices.
  • Vanhanen, Faculty of Forestry, University of Joensuu, P.O.B. 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Veteli, Faculty of Biosciences, University of Joensuu, P.O.B. 111, FI-80101, Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: timo.veteli@joensuu.fi (email)
  • Päivinen, Faculty of Forestry, University of Joensuu, P.O.B. 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kellomäki, Faculty of Forestry, University of Joensuu, P.O.B. 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Niemelä, Faculty of Forestry, University of Joensuu, P.O.B. 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 279, category Research article
Gerben Janse. (2007). Characteristics and challenges of forest sector communication in the EU. Silva Fennica vol. 41 no. 4 article id 279. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.279
Fragmentation of forest policy at the EU level and image problems of the forest industry have increased forest sector actors’ interest for cooperation on and coordination of communication activities. Although internal communication in the forest sector at the European level is generally well developed both formally and informally, the desired strengthening of communication with other sectors and the public at large is perceived as difficult. In this pre-study 39 interviews were conducted with EU and UNECE/FAO officials, EU level Forest-based Industries and forestry sector federation representatives, and forest scientists working at the European level. The results indicate that EU level forest sector core actors’ ideas on communication differ. Ideas range from strictly image improvement; being more successful at lobbying with other sectors and high-level policy-makers; up to building long-lasting relations and two-way communication processes with other sectors. This makes it difficult to come to coordinated action among forest sector actors. A more active exchange of information on best practices in forest communication between national as well as European level actors, and increased coordination of communication efforts is desired by industry, forest owners as well as policy-makers. However, clear ideas on how to improve, especially inter-sectoral, communication are largely lacking.
  • Janse, European Forest Institute, Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: gerben.janse@efi.int (email)
article id 278, category Research article
Katri Luostarinen. (2007). The effect of annual ring orientation and drying method on deformations, casehardening and colour of silver birch (Betula pendula) boards. Silva Fennica vol. 41 no. 4 article id 278. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.278
Deformations of timber, caused mainly by anisotropic shrinkage, can be partially directed by controlling annual ring orientation through different sawing patterns. Ring orientation also affects the movement of water from within the board to its surface, with rapidity of drying having implications for the wood colour. Here sawn silver birch (Betula pendula Roth) timber was classed into two groups according to ring orientation. Two drying methods were used. The final moisture content was lower and the colour lighter in dried boards with radial than with tangential flats, but deformations were larger in radial than in tangential boards. Both drying and ring orientation affected the final moisture content and moisture gradient of the boards. Very small differences in board sizes or shape had an effect on both colour and deformations. The results support the need for accurate sawing and for classing silver birch timber sawn into parquet billets according to ring orientation in order to optimise the drying quality.
  • Luostarinen, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: katri.luostarinen@joensuu.fi (email)
article id 277, category Research article
Laura Koskela, Bikas K. Sinha & Tapio Nummi. (2007). Some aspects of the sampling distribution of the Apportionment Index and related inference. Silva Fennica vol. 41 no. 4 article id 277. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.277
As customer-oriented production strategies have gained ground in the sawmill industry, proper measurement of the fit between the log demand and log output distributions has become of crucial importance. The prevailing means of measuring the outcome is the so-called Apportionment Index (AI), which is calculated from the relative proportions of the observed and required distributions. Although some statistical properties of the AI have recently been examined and alternative means of measuring the bucking outcome have been suggested, properties of the sampling distribution of the AI have not yet been widely studied. In this article we examine the asymptotic sampling distribution for the AI by assuming a multinomial distribution for the outcome. Our results are based mainly on large-sample normal approximations. Also some studies of the determination of the number of logs needed to obtain a specified level of accuracy of the AI have been carried out.
  • Koskela, University of Tampere, Dept of Mathematics, Statistics and Philosophy, FI-33014 University of Tampere, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: laura.koskela@uta.fi (email)
  • Sinha, Indian Statistical Institute, Kolkata, India ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Nummi, University of Tampere, Dept of Mathematics, Statistics and Philosophy, FI-33014 University of Tampere, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 276, category Research article
Jianping Zhu, Pete Bettinger & Rongxia Li. (2007). Additional insight into the performance of a new heuristic for solving spatially constrained forest planning problems. Silva Fennica vol. 41 no. 4 article id 276. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.276
The raindrop method of searching a solution space for feasible and efficient forest management plans has been demonstrated as being useful under a limited set of circumstances, mainly where adjacency restrictions are accommodated using the unit restriction model. We expanded on this work and applied the model (in a modified form) to a problem that had both wood flow and area restriction adjacency constraints, then tested the problem formulation on six hypothetical forests of different sizes and age class distributions. Threshold accepting and tabu search were both applied to the problems as well. The modified raindrop method’s performance was best when applied to forests with normal age class distributions. 1-opt tabu search worked best on forests with young age class distributions. Threshold accepting and the raindrop method both performed well on forests with older age class distributions. On average, the raindrop method produced higher quality solutions for most of the problems, and in all but one case where it did not, the solutions generated were not significantly different than the heuristic that located a better solution. The advantage of the raindrop method is that it uses only two parameters and does not require extensive parameterization. The disadvantage is the amount of time it needs to solve problems with area restriction adjacency constraints. We suggest that it may be advantageous to use this heuristic on problems with relatively simple spatial forest planning constraints, and problems that do not involve young initial age class distributions. However, generalization of the performance of the raindrop method to other forest planning problems is problematic, and will require examination by those interested in pursuing this planning methodology. Given that our tests of the raindrop method are limited to a small set of URM and ARM formulations, one should view the combined set of work as additional insight into the potential performance of the method on problems of current interest to the forest planning community.
  • Zhu, Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Bettinger, Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA ORCID ID:E-mail: pbettinger@warnell.uga.edu (email)
  • Li, Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 275, category Research article
Lauri Korhonen, Kari T. Korhonen, Pauline Stenberg, Matti Maltamo & Miina Rautiainen. (2007). Local models for forest canopy cover with beta regression. Silva Fennica vol. 41 no. 4 article id 275. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.275
Accurate field measurement of the forest canopy cover is too laborious to be used in extensive forest inventories. A possible alternative to the separate canopy cover measurements is to utilize the correlations between the percent canopy cover and easier-to-measure forest variables, especially the basal area. A fairly new analysis technique, the beta regression, is specially designed for modelling percentages. As an extension to the generalized linear models, the beta regression takes into account the distribution of the model residuals, and uses a logistic link function to ensure logical predictions. In this study, the beta regression method was found to perform well in conifer dominated study area located in central Finland. The same model shape, with basal area, tree height and an additional predictor (Scots pine: site fertility, Norway spruce: percentage of hardwoods) as independent variables, produced good results for both pine and spruce dominated sites. The models had reasonably high pseudo R-squared values (pine: 0.91, spruce: 0.87) and low standard errors (pine: 6.3%, spruce: 5.9%) for the fitting data, and also performed well in a cross validation test. The models were also tested on separate test plots located in a different geographical area, where the prediction errors were slightly larger (pine: 8.8%, spruce: 7.4%). In pine plots, the model fit was further improved by introducing additional predictors such as stand age and density. This improved also the performance of the models in the cross validation test, but weakened the results for the external data set. Our results indicated that the beta regression method offers a noteworthy alternative to separate canopy cover measurements, especially if time is limited and the models can be applied in the same region where the modelling data were collected.
  • Korhonen, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: lauri.korhonen@joensuu.fi (email)
  • Korhonen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu Research Unit, P.O. Box 68, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Stenberg, Univ. of Helsinki, Dept of Forest Resource Management, P.O. BOX 27, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Maltamo, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Rautiainen, Univ. of Helsinki, Dept of Forest Resource Management, P.O. BOX 27, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 274, category Research article
Timo Saksa & Jari Miina. (2007). Cleaning methods in planted Scots pine stands in southern Finland: 4-year results on survival, growth and whipping damage of pines. Silva Fennica vol. 41 no. 4 article id 274. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.274
The effects of four cleaning treatments on the survival, growth of, and whipping damage to Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) main stems were studied in young planted pine stands in southern Finland. Treatments were: no cleaning, point-cleaning of broadleaves (mainly birch, Betula pendula Roth and B. pubescens Ehrh.) within a radius of 1 m from the pine, topping of competing broadleaves, and total cleaning of broadleaves. A randomised complete block design with three replicates was established in five sapling stands: the mean height of the pines was 1.5 m in the three younger stands (6 or 7 years old), and 3 m in the two older stands (9 years old). Measurements taken four growing seasons later showed that in the younger stands, all cleaning treatments significantly (P < 0.05) decreased the mortality and increased the diameter increment of the pines. The height increment of the pines on point-cleaned and topped plots was significantly greater than on totally cleaned plots. In the older stands, the effects of cleaning treatments on the mortality and increment of pines were non-significant. In the younger and older stands, point-cleaning and total cleaning significantly reduced the whipping damage to pines, whereas the topping of competing broadleaves did not. The preliminary results support the use of point-cleaning in planted Scots pine stands when the mean height of the pines is about 1.5 m.
  • Saksa, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Suonenjoki Unit, Juntintie 154, FI-77600 Suonenjoki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: timo.saksa@metla.fi (email)
  • Miina, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu Unit, P.O.Box 68, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 273, category Research article
Stefan Mattson, Urban Bergsten & Tommy Mörling. (2007). Pinus contorta growth in boreal Sweden as affected by combined lupin treatment and soil scarification. Silva Fennica vol. 41 no. 4 article id 273. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.273
Effects of combining lupin (Lupinus nootkatensis L.) establishment and soil scarification on stem volume and stem biomass yield of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. var. latifolia Engelm.) were studied on a poor boreal site in Sweden 18 years after plantation. A field randomized block experiment was established with three different scarification techniques (disc trenching, moulding and ploughing) followed by establishment of lupins by either seeds or roots. There were three blocks without and two blocks with lupins. Overall, on average for the three soil scarification techniques, the lupin treatment significantly increased the volume per hectare by 102%.The lupin treatment significantly increased the stem volume per hectare by 236% for mounding and 139% for disc trenching, whereas the 55% increase for ploughing was not significant. The increase in the total stem biomass yield per tree was more pronounced for larger trees; 46% for average trees and 106% for dominant trees. However, there were no significant differences between scarification techniques for the lupin treatment in total stem biomass yield. Over the 18-year period, the increased growth rate following the lupin treatment resulted in a significantly decreased average stem basic wood density (on average 6%) for the sample trees. Because lupin is a nitrogen-fixing plant species, the large increase in tree growth following the lupin treatment was probably an effect of increased amount of nitrogen in the soil. The results indicate that use of lupin is a possible alternative to increase site productivity of lodgepole pine on poor boreal sites.
  • Mattson, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Dept of Forest Ecology and Management, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Bergsten, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Dept of Forest Ecology and Management, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Mörling, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Dept of Forest Ecology and Management, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: tommy.morling@ssko.slu.se (email)
article id 272, category Research article
Jonas Rönnberg, Mattias Berglund & Ulf Johansson. (2007). Incidence of butt rot at final felling and at first thinning of the subsequent rotation of Norway spruce stands in south-western Sweden. Silva Fennica vol. 41 no. 4 article id 272. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.272
The incidence of butt rot in Norway spruce stands at final felling and at first thinning of the subsequent rotation was investigated at 20 sites in south-western Sweden. There was a negative correlation between the incidence at first thinning and the basal area of decayed trees at final felling. Using incidence of decay or basal area of decayed trees to predict disease transfer between rotations is difficult and requires the inclusion of several factors, making predictions uncertain. The level of infection found at final felling in this study varied between 7 and 71.8%, indicating that the risk of spore infection transfer to the next rotation was probably quite low. Long-term experiments are required to reveal the effect of stump treatment on disease transmission between rotations.
  • Rönnberg, SLU, Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, P.O. Box 49, SE-23053 Alnarp, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: jonas.ronnberg@ess.slu.se (email)
  • Berglund, SLU, Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, P.O. Box 49, SE-23053 Alnarp, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Johansson, Tönnersjöheden Experimental Forest, P.O. Box 17, SE-31038 Simlångsdalen, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 271, category Research article
Patrick Insinna, Risto Jalkanen & Bernhard Götz. (2007). Climate impact on 100-year foliage chronologies of Scots pine and Ponderosa pine in the northeast lowlands of Brandenburg, Germany. Silva Fennica vol. 41 no. 4 article id 271. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.271
Due to differences in the high-frequency signal and mean sensitivity of needle parameters in Scots pine and Ponderosa pine revealed in previous investigations, variance caused by climate factors at a dry site in the northeast lowlands of Brandenburg was investigated. Although water is the general limiting factor for both tree species, there are evident differences in the climate-driven impact on individual needle parameters. Autumn precipitation of the previous year was equally important for Scots pine and Ponderosa pine, but summer precipitation was more significant for the needle parameters of Scots pine. In contrast to precipitation, temperature seems to have a minor impact on needle parameters. Although January temperatures are significant predictors for both species, intercorrelations between needle parameters and summer temperatures were found only for Ponderosa pine. Striking correlation was also found between sun activity and needle production in Ponderosa pine, but not Scots pine, indicating possible adaptation to solar radiation.
  • Insinna, Office for Environmental Protection Liechtenstein, Climate Change Division, P.O. Box 684, FL-9490 Vaduz, Liechtenstein ORCID ID:E-mail: patrick.insinna@aus.llv.li (email)
  • Jalkanen, Rovaniemi Research Unit, Finnish Forest Research Institute, P.O. Box 16, FI-96301 Rovaniemi, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Götz, Eberswalde University of Applied Sciences, Department of Forestry, Forest-Botanical Gardens, D-16225 Eberswalde, Germany ORCID ID:E-mail:

Category: Research note

article id 927, category Research note
Risto Jalkanen, Carmen Büttner & Susanne von Bargen. (2007). Cherry leaf roll virus abundant on Betula pubescens in Finland. Silva Fennica vol. 41 no. 4 article id 927. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.927
Virus-related symptoms such as vein banding, leaf roll, chlorosis and subsequent necrosis on birch leaves were increasingly recorded throughout Finland since 2002. They are widespread in this country and have also been detected in northern Norway and Sweden. Symptomatic foliage has so far been found on Betula pendula, B. pubescens, B. pubescens subsp. czerepanovii, and B. nana. A Cherry leaf roll virus (CLRV) specific IC-RT-PCR was applied to young leaves, buds and catkins of symptomatic shoots of nineteen pubescent and one silver birch trees grown in the centre of Rovaniemi, Finland. CLRV was found in seventeen B. pubescens trees. This is the first time that B. pubescens has been confirmed to be a host species for CLRV in Finland. Nor has CLRV been recorded earlier in northern Finland.
  • Jalkanen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Rovaniemi Research Unit, P.O. Box 16, FI-96301 Rovaniemi, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: risto.jalkanen@metla.fi (email)
  • Büttner, Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Institut für Gartenbauwissenschaften, Fachgebiet Phytomedizin, Lentzeallee 55/57, 14195 Berlin, Germany ORCID ID:E-mail: Carmen.Buettner@agrar.hu-berlin.de
  • Bargen, Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Institut für Gartenbauwissenschaften, Fachgebiet Phytomedizin, Lentzeallee 55/57, 14195 Berlin, Germany ORCID ID:E-mail: susanne.von.bargen@agrar.hu-berlin.de
article id 470, category Research note
Paula Jylhä & Juha Laitila. (2007). Energy wood and pulpwood harvesting from young stands using a prototype whole-tree bundler. Silva Fennica vol. 41 no. 4 article id 470. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.470
The productivity of cutting and bundling whole trees using the first prototype of a bundle-harvester comprised of a harwarder as the base machine, an accumulating felling head, and a compacting device was studied in three young stands in order to facilitate the further development of the concept. In addition, the removal and its composition were studied as a means of laying the foundations for developing methods for work rating and measurement on delivery. Bundling enables in-depth integration of pulpwood and energy wood procurement. Both energy wood (crown biomass) and pulpwood can be incorporated into the same bundles, and the subsequent separation of these fractions takes place at the debarking phase at the pulpmill. Bundle-harvesting productivities were relatively low (2.8–3.7 m3/E0-h) when compared to current harvesting technology. Improving working techniques, machine structure, and components showed great potential for increasing the efficiency of the concept. The bundles were dimensionally uniform. Their solid volume varied between 0.350 m3 and 0.513 m3, depending on the bundle assortment and stand properties. Integrating energy wood harvesting with pulpwood harvesting increased removal even by 59 per cent.
  • Jylhä, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Kannus Research Unit, P.O. Box 44, FI-69101 Kannus, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: paula.jylha@metla.fi (email)
  • Laitila, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu Research Unit, P.O. Box 68, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:

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