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Silva Fennica vol. 40 no. 4 | 2006

Category: Commentary

article id 475, category Commentary
Petteri Muukkonen, Raisa Mäkipää. (2006). Biomass equations for European trees: addendum. Silva Fennica vol. 40 no. 4 article id 475. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.475
A review of stem volume and biomass equations for tree species growing in Europe (Zianis et al. 2005) resulted in suggestions for additional equations. The numbers of original equations, compiled from scientific articles were 607 for biomass and 230 for stem volume. On the basis of the suggestions and an updated literature search, some new equations were published after our review, but more equations were also available from earlier literature. In this addendum, an additional 188 biomass equations and 8 volume equations are presented. One new tree species (Pinus cembra) is included in the list of volume equations. Biomass equations for twelve new tree species are presented: Abies alba, Carbinus betulus, Larix decidua, P. cembra, P. nigra, Quercus robur, Salix caprea, S. ‘Aquatica’, S. dasyclados, S. phylicifolias, S. triandra and S. accuparia. The tree-level equations predict stem volume, whole tree biomass or biomass of certain components (e.g., foliage, roots, total above-ground) as a function of diameter or diameter and height of a tree. Biomass and volume equations with other independent variables have also been widely developed but they are excluded from this addendum because the variables selected may reflect locally valid dependencies that cannot be generalized to other geographical regions. Most of the equations presented here are developed for Sweden, Finland and Norway in northern Europe, for Austria in central Europe and for Italy in southern Europe. There are also few equations from Poland and Belgium. Most of the equations deal with above-ground components such as stem, branches and foliage, but some new equations are also available for root biomass. Zianis et al. (2005) and this addendum can be used together as guides to the original publications of these equations. Our updated database of the biomass and volume equations is available also from the website www.metla.fi/hanke/3306/tietokanta.htm.
  • Muukkonen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, P.O. Box 18, FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: petteri.muukkonen@metla.fi
  • Mäkipää, Finnish Forest Research Institute, P.O. Box 18, FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: raisa.makipaa@metla.fi (email)

Category: Research article

article id 323, category Research article
Simo Kyllönen, Alfred Colpaert, Hannu Heikkinen, Mikko Jokinen, Jouko Kumpula, Mika Marttunen, Kari Muje, Kaisa Raitio. (2006). Conflict management as a means to the sustainable use of natural resources. Silva Fennica vol. 40 no. 4 article id 323. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.323
Democratic societies’ emphasis on individual rights and freedoms inevitably opens them up to political disputes. Conflict management should thus be seen as an integral part of democratic institutional design. The evolution and management of policy disputes concerning the use of different natural resources in Finland is analysed by using the theoretical models of frame analysis and strategic interaction. The studied disputes include lake fisheries, watercourse regulation, reindeer herding, and forestry. The institutional design in the case studies varies. Despite the differences, many common features are identified that could explain their successes or difficulties in achieving sustainable and cooperative use of the resources. Among these are problems involving complex and uncertain knowledge, differences in frames held by multiple users of a resource, and distrust between the users and other parties. The analysis concludes with preliminary conclusions on how various disputes related to sustainable resource use could be managed. These include addressing the knowledge and frame problems in order to initiate a learning process; establishing sub-processes in which mutual trust between the parties – including a managing authority or a third party – can emerge; giving explicit roles and a clear division of entitlement to the parties; and providing a credible alternative for co-operation that affects the parties’ payoff assessments during the process. Finally, the conflict management process shouldn’t be regarded as a distinct phase of dispute resolution, but as an essential aspect of ongoing co-management practices of resource use.
  • Kyllönen, Department of Social and Moral Philosophy, P.O. Box 9, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: simo.kyllonen@helsinki.fi (email)
  • Colpaert, University of Joensuu, Department of Geography, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Heikkinen, Taida, P.O. Box 1000, FI-90014 University of Oulu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Jokinen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Kolari Research Unit, Muoniontie 21 A, FI-95900 Kolari, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kumpula, Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute, Reindeer Research Station, Toivoniementie 246, FI-99910 Kaamanen, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Marttunen, Finnish Environment Institute, P.O. Box 140, FI-00251 Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Muje, Department of Biological and Environmental Science, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 University of Jyväskylä, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Raitio, Department of Social and Policy, University of Joensuu, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 322, category Research article
Jaakko Repola. (2006). Models for vertical wood density of Scots pine, Norway spruce and birch stems, and their application to determine average wood density. Silva Fennica vol. 40 no. 4 article id 322. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.322
The purpose of this study was to investigate the vertical dependence of the basic density of Scots pine, Norway spruce, and birch stems, and how such dependence could be applied for determining the average stem wood density. The study material consisted of 38 Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), 39 Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst.) and 15 birch (Betula pendula and Betula pubescens) stands located on mineral soil sites in southern Finland. The stem material mainly represented thinning removal from stands at different stages of development. The linear mixed model technique, with both fixed and random effects, was used to estimate the model. According to the fixed part of the model, wood density was dependent on the vertical location along the stem in all three tree species. Wood density in pine decreased from the butt to the top, and the gradient in wood density was steep at the butt but decreased in the upper part of the stem. The vertical dependence was similar in birch, but the density gradient was much smaller. For spruce the vertical dependence of the basic density was moderate. The model can be calibrated for a tree stem when one or more sample disks are measured at freely selected heights. Using treewise calibrated predictions of the vertical density dependence and measured stem diameters, almost unbiased estimates, and lower prediction errors than with traditional methods, were obtained for the average stem wood density. The advantages of the method were greater for pine with a strong vertical dependence in basic density, than for spruce and birch.
  • Repola, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Rovaniemi Research Unit, Eteläranta 55, FI-96300 Rovaniemi, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: jaakko.repola@metla.fi (email)
article id 321, category Research article
Jori Uusitalo, Anne Puustelli, Veli-Pekka Kivinen, Tapio Nummi, Bikas K. Sinha. (2006). Bayesian estimation of diameter distribution during harvesting. Silva Fennica vol. 40 no. 4 article id 321. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.321
This research aims to combine two different data sets with Bayesian statistics in order to predict the diameter distribution of trees at harvest. The parameters of prior distribution are derived from the forest management plans supplemented by additional ocular information. We derive the parameters for the sample data from the first trees harvested, and then create the posterior distribution within the Bayesian framework. We apply the standard normal distribution to construct diameter (dbh) distributions, although many other theoretical distributions have been proved better with dbh data available. The methodology developed is then tested on nine mature spruce (Picea abies) dominated stands, on which the normal distribution seems to work well in mature spruce stands. The tests indicate that prediction of diameter distribution for the whole stand based on the first trees harvested is not wise, since it tends to give inaccurate predictions. Combining the first trees harvested with prior information seems to increase the reliability of predictions.
  • Uusitalo, The Finnish Forest Research Institute, Parkano unit, FI-39700 Parkano, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: jori.uusitalo@metla.fi (email)
  • Puustelli, University of Tampere, Department of Mathematics, Statistics and Philosophy, FI-33014 University of Tampere, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kivinen, University of Helsinki, Department of Forest Resource Management, Box 27, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Nummi, University of Tampere, Department of Mathematics, Statistics and Philosophy, FI-33014 University of Tampere, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Sinha, Stat-Math Division, Indian Statistical Institute, 203 B.T. Road, Kolkata - 700 108, India ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 320, category Research article
Saija Huuskonen, Jari Hynynen. (2006). Timing and intensity of precommercial thinning and their effects on the first commercial thinning in Scots pine stands. Silva Fennica vol. 40 no. 4 article id 320. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.320
The effects of the timing and intensity of precommercial thinning on the stand diameter development and wood production in Scots pine stands was addressed. A model was developed in order to assess the thinning response of the stand diameter development. The effect of precommercial and first commercial thinning on the stand volume and the thinning removal at first commercial thinning were also modelled. The models were developed to be applicable for forest management planning purposes. The results are based on Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) trials (13 experiments and 169 plots) located in Southern and Central Finland. Precommercial thinning considerably enhanced the diameter development. Precommercial thinning (at Hdom 3 m to 2000 trees per hectare) increased the mean diameter by 15% at the first commercial thinning stage (Hdom 14 m) compared to the unthinned stand (3000 trees ha–1). Early and intensive precommercial thinning resulted in the strongest response in diameter development. Wide spacing also enhanced the diameter increment. In naturally regenerated stands the diameter development was ca 13% slower than that in seeded stands. The total volume at the time of first commercial thinning was affected by the timing of thinning and the stand structure. The volume of merchantable thinning removal depended on the timing and intensity of precommercial and first commercial thinnings. Delaying the first commercial thinning from 12 meters (Hdom) to 16 meters increased the volume of thinning removal by ca.70%. The early and light precommercial thinning (Hdom 3 m, to density of 3000 trees per hectare) increased the thinning removal by 40% compared to the late and intensive precommercial thinning (at 7 meters to the density of 2000 trees per hectare).
  • Huuskonen, University of Helsinki, Dept. of Forest Ecology, P.O. Box 27, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Hynynen, The Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa Research Unit, P.O. Box 18, FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 319, category Research article
Ulises Diéguez-Aranda, José Antonio Grandas-Arias, Juan Gabriel Álvarez-González, Klaus von Gadow. (2006). Site quality curves for birch stands in north-western Spain. Silva Fennica vol. 40 no. 4 article id 319. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.319
A model for predicting the height growth of even-aged, birch (Betula pubescens Ehrh.) dominated stands in Galicia (north-western Spain) was developed. Data from stem analysis of 214 trees were used for model construction. Two dynamic site equations derived with the generalized algebraic difference approach (GADA) were tested, which combine compatible site index and height models in one common equation. Both equations are base-age invariant and directly estimate height and site index from any height and age. The fittings were done in one stage using the base-age-invariant dummy variables method. A second-order continuous-time autoregressive error structure was used to correct the inherent autocorrelation of the longitudinal data used in this study. Cieszewski’s model best described the data. This model is therefore recommended for height growth prediction and site classification of birch stands in Galicia.
  • Diéguez-Aranda, Departamento de Ingeniería Agroforestal, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela. Escuela Politécnica Superior, Campus universitario, 27002 Lugo, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail: udieguez@lugo.usc.es (email)
  • Grandas-Arias, Departamento de Ingeniería Agroforestal, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela. Escuela Politécnica Superior, Campus universitario, 27002 Lugo, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Álvarez-González, Departamento de Ingeniería Agroforestal, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela. Escuela Politécnica Superior, Campus universitario, 27002 Lugo, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Gadow, Institut fur Waldinventur und Waldwachstum, George-Auguts-Universität Göttingen. Büsgenweg 5, D-37077 Göttingen, Germany ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 318, category Research article
Sofia Backéus, Peder Wikström, Tomas Lämås. (2006). Modeling carbon sequestration and timber production in a regional case study. Silva Fennica vol. 40 no. 4 article id 318. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.318
Forests make up large ecosystems and by the uptake of carbon dioxide can play an important role in mitigating the greenhouse effect. In this study, mitigation of carbon emissions through carbon uptake and storage in forest biomass and the use of forest biofuel for fossil fuel substitution were considered. The analysis was performed for a 3.2 million hectare region in northern Sweden. The objective was to maximize net present value for harvested timber, biofuel production and carbon sequestration. A carbon price for build-up of carbon storage and for emissions from harvested forest products was introduced to achieve an economic value for carbon sequestration. Forest development was simulated using an optimizing stand-level planning model, and the solution for the whole region was found using linear programming. A range of carbon prices was used to study the effect on harvest levels and carbon sequestration. At a zero carbon price, the mean annual harvest level was 5.4 million m3, the mean annual carbon sequestration in forest biomass was 1.48 million tonnes and the mean annual replacement of carbon from fossil fuel with forest biofuel was 61 000 tonnes. Increasing the carbon price led to decreasing harvest levels of timber and decreasing harvest levels of forest biofuel. Also, thinning activities decreased more than clear-cut activities when the carbon prices increased. The level of carbon sequestration was governed by the harvest level and the site productivity. This led to varying results for different parts of the region.
  • Backéus, SLU, Dept. of Forest Resource Management and Geomatics, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: sofia.backeus@resgeom.slu.se (email)
  • Wikström, SLU, Dept. of Forest Resource Management and Geomatics, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Lämås, SLU, Dept. of Forest Resource Management and Geomatics, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 317, category Research article
Erik Eriksson, Tord Johansson. (2006). Effects of rotation period on biomass production and atmospheric CO2 emissions from broadleaved stands growing on abandoned farmland. Silva Fennica vol. 40 no. 4 article id 317. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.317
The growth rates and carbon stocks of unthinned young and mature stands of broadleaved trees growing on abandoned farmland were determined to assess whether their management regimes should involve short (15-year) or long (45-year) rotations to maximize biomass production and reductions of CO2 emissions. Dry mass production and mean annual increment (MAI) were calculated for 28 young stands and 65 mature stands of European aspen (Populus tremula L.), common alder (Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn.), grey alder (Alnus incana (L.) Moench.), silver birch (Betula pendula Roth) and downy birch (Betula pubescens Ehrh.) ranging in latitude from 57° to 63° N in Sweden. The potential for using biomass from the stands to replace coal as a fuel and to store carbon was then evaluated both in short and long rotation scenarios. The results indicate that long rotations are beneficial if the objective is to maximize the average carbon stock in biomass. If, on the other hand, the intention is to optimize reductions in atmospheric CO2 emissions, rotations should be short for aspen, silver birch and grey alder stands. For downy birch and common alder, the MAI was higher for the mature stands than the young stands, indicating that in these species the mature stands are superior for both storing carbon and replacing fossil fuel. Stands of broadleaved trees grown to produce biofuel on abandoned farmland should be established on fertile soils to promote high MAI. If the MAI is low, the rotation period should be long to maximize the average carbon stock.
  • Eriksson, SLU, Dept of Bioenergy, P.O. Box 7061, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Johansson, SLU, Dept of Bioenergy, P.O. Box 7061, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 316, category Research article
Sonja Vospernik. (2006). Probability of bark stripping damage by red deer (Cervus elaphus) in Austria. Silva Fennica vol. 40 no. 4 article id 316. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.316
Bark stripping by red deer (Cervus elaphus) causes considerable damage to Austrian forests, however, the incidence of bark stripping was never examined from large scale survey data. In this manuscript we present a logistic regression model for bark stripping damage (static model) and a model for recent (5-year period) bark stripping damage to previously undamaged trees (dynamic model) developed from Austrian National Forest Inventory data. Both models showed bark stripping damage to be most frequent in core red deer habitat areas and less frequent in less suitable habitat. Damage was concentrated at elevations of 400–1200 m and in alluvial forests (only static model). Norway spruce (Picea abies), European ash (Fraxinus excelsior), Sweet chestnut (Castanea sativa) and Sorbus spp. had 11–12 times more injuries than all the other species. Red deer preferred the smallest trees with a breast height diameter of 5 cm for bark stripping and damage probability decreased rapidly for trees with a breast height diameter greater than 25 cm. Our static model showed a maximum of bark stripping damage in stands with a mean height of 20 m. In the dynamic model the probability for bark stripping damage decreased with decreasing mean height. Also, in the static model the probability for bark stripping damage increased with increasing spruce proportion and with increasing stand density whereas in the dynamic model the proportion of previous bark stripping damage was a good predictor. Goodness of fit and discrimination of both models were good. In combination with forest growth models, the bark stripping models can be used to predict the risk of damage associated with different forest and habitat management options.
  • Vospernik, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Institute of Forest Growth Research, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, Peter-Jordan-Stra§e 82, A-1190 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail: sonja.vospernik@boku.ac.at (email)
article id 315, category Research article
Lauri Korhonen, Kari T. Korhonen, Miina Rautiainen, Pauline Stenberg. (2006). Estimation of forest canopy cover: a comparison of field measurement techniques. Silva Fennica vol. 40 no. 4 article id 315. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.315
Estimation of forest canopy cover has recently been included in many forest inventory programmes. In this study, after discussing how canopy cover is defined, different ground-based canopy cover estimation techniques are compared to determine which would be the most feasible for a large scale forest inventory. Canopy cover was estimated in 19 Scots pine or Norway spruce dominated plots using the Cajanus tube, line intersect sampling, modified spherical densiometer, digital photographs, and ocular estimation. The comparisons were based on the differences in values acquired with selected techniques and control values acquired with the Cajanus tube. The statistical significance of the differences between the techniques was tested with the nonparametric Kruskall-Wallis analysis of variance and multiple comparisons. The results indicate that different techniques yield considerably different canopy cover estimates. In general, labour intensive techniques (the Cajanus tube, line intersect sampling) provide unbiased and more precise estimates, whereas the estimates provided by fast techniques (digital photographs, ocular estimation) have larger variances and may also be seriously biased.
  • Korhonen, University of Joensuu, P.O. Box 68, FI-68101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: lauri.korhonen@joensuu.fi (email)
  • Korhonen, University of Joensuu, P.O. Box 68, FI-68101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Rautiainen, University of Joensuu, P.O. Box 68, FI-68101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Stenberg, University of Joensuu, P.O. Box 68, FI-68101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 314, category Research article
Yuhua Wang, Helena Korpelainen, Chunyang Li. (2006). Microsatellite polymorphism in the edaphic spruce, Picea asperata, originating from the mountains of China. Silva Fennica vol. 40 no. 4 article id 314. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.314
Microsatellite variation of Picea asperata Mast. originating from the mountains of China was investigated by analyzing variation at seven SSR loci in 250 individuals representing ten populations. A fair degree of genetic diversity and considerable population subdivision occurred with the mean gene diversity (H) of 0.707, and genetic distances among populations varying between 0.121 and 0.224 (FST) and between 0.100 and 0.537 (RST). However, inter-population genetic distances showed no correlation with geographic distances between the population sites. This ruled out a simple isolation by distance model and suggested that migration does not have a great impact. In fact, the amount of gene flow, detected using private alleles, was very low, equaling only 0.753. Allele permutation tests revealed that stepwise-like mutations, coupled with genetic drift, could contribute to population differentiation. Moreover, significant genetic differences between populations were detected at most loci. The results indicate that natural selection, presumably through environmental stress, may be one of the main factors causing micro-geographical differentiation in the genetic structure of P. asperata. Based on SSR genotypes, 70% of the 250 individuals were correctly classified into their sites of origin. This suggests that microsatellites (SSRs) are effective in distinguishing genotypes of P. asperata originating from diverse eco-geographical sites in China.
  • Wang, Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 416, Chengdu 610041, China; Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039, China ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Korpelainen, Department of Applied Biology, P.O. Box 27, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Li, Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 416, Chengdu 610041, China ORCID ID:E-mail: licy@cib.ac.cn (email)

Category: Research note

article id 325, category Research note
Daniel Eriksson, Henrik Lindberg, Urban Bergsten. (2006). Influence of silvicultural regime on wood structure characteristics and mechanical properties of clear wood in Pinus sylvestris. Silva Fennica vol. 40 no. 4 article id 325. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.325
The objective of the study presented here was to evaluate the influence of two contrasting silvicultural regimes on the structural characteristics and mechanical properties of different wood tissue types at different heights in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) trees, and reasons for these differences. Wood samples were taken from two stands (a dense 85-year-old stand established by direct seeding and a 56-year-old widely spaced stand established by planting, designated SDR and PWR, respectively in the boreal zone of Sweden). The wood properties associated with the examined silvicultural regimes differed, in terms of both structural characteristics (with up to fivefold differences between SDR and PWR) and mechanical properties (with up to almost threefold differences between SDR and PWR). Differences between the regimes were highest for stiffness, followed by strength and hardness properties and lowest for relative stiffness after 1000 h of loading (creep) (with higher parameter values for SDR than for PWR in each case). The rankings could be explained by differences among the mechanical properties in their sensitivity to maturation of wood characteristics. In conclusion, silvicultural regimes have great potential to regulate wood structural characteristics and mechanical properties, apparently due to the influences of the green crown and growth rate on the vascular cambium, the strength of which vary throughout the rotation period. A silvicultural regime could therefore be seen as a tool that can be used to select material qualities and to make wood a more homogenous material for engineers.
  • Eriksson, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Vindeln Experimental Forest, Svartberget Fieldstation, SE-922 91 Vindeln, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: daniel.eriksson@esf.slu.se (email)
  • Lindberg, Luleå University of Technology, Division of Polymer Engineering, SE-971 87 Luleå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Bergsten, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Silviculture, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 324, category Research note
Matti Katila. (2006). Empirical errors of small area estimates from the multisource National Forest Inventory in Eastern Finland. Silva Fennica vol. 40 no. 4 article id 324. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.324
The precision of multisource national forest inventory (MS-NFI) estimators and simple synthetic estimators based on NFI field data only was assessed employing an independent inventory data set of several small areas in Eastern Finland. There were seven test units of size 100 km2 and three test units of size 1 km2 for which a systematic field sampling was carried out. The ‘improved’ MS-NFI method yielded the most precise estimates for mean volume and mean volume of pine and spruce: relative root mean square errors (RMSE*) were 5%, 12% and 15% for 100 km2 test units and 13%, 27% and 40% for 1 km2 test units respectively. The stratified MS-NFI method was best for broad-leaved volume estimation. Synthetic estimation based on the NFI9 field plots post-stratified with coarse scale forest variable maps from NFI8 resulted in RMSE*s comparable to those of the ordinary MS-NFI in areas of 100 km2 for mean volume and mean volume of pine and spruce. The amount of variation between the field inventory estimates for the test units explained by the MS-NFI estimators remained the same or increased when the size of the area increased from of 1 km2 to 100 km2 and up to 2000 km2. The validation of the largest areas was made against the NFI9 field inventory estimates for groups of municipalities in the study area.
  • Katila, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Unioninkatu 40 A, FI-00170 Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:

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