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Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 1 | 2001

Category: Research article

article id 607, category Research article
Jurkka Kuusipalo. (2001). Plastic coating of plywood using extrusion technique. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 1 article id 607. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.607
The target was to study and develop industrially suitable methods to apply thermoplastic coatings on plywood. Typically, wear and climatic resistance for wooden sheets, such as chip board and plywood, is achieved by thermosetting resin coating (e.g. phenol-formaldehyde). However, economical and environmental issues are driving towards thermoplastic coatings (e.g. polyethylene) in such products. Several technologies, such as film gluing and laminating, have been introduced, but the costs and processing are limiting factors. This study concentrates on direct coating of plywood with extruded molten plastic film, in other words extrusion coating of plywood. This technique provides fast coating process and cheap raw materials. In the study it was found that extrusion coating of plywood is difficult. The high heat energy of the molten plastic causes moisture evaporation of the top veneer, and the only possible escape direction of the evaporated moisture is through the plastic, which causes bubbling in the plastic coating. Another disadvantage of the plywood is its rigidity, which limits the development of the process. In this work, a new technique was applied for coating the flexible veneers with typical extrusion coating equipment, where the escape of the evaporated moisture was possible through the top veneer to the atmosphere. Another main issue was to reach sufficient adhesion between plastic and plywood. Target was achieved using either monolayer polyethylene (PE-LD) or 2-layer polypropylene/adhesion polymer plastic coatings.
  • Kuusipalo, Tampere University of Technology, Institute of Paper Converting, Korkeakoulunkatu 4 C, P.O. Box 541, FIN-33720 Tampere, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: jurkka@cc.tut.fi (email)
article id 606, category Research article
Pekka Leskinen & Jyrki Kangas. (2001). Modelling future timber price development by using expert judgments and time series analysis. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 1 article id 606. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.606
Timber prices belong to the most important variables affecting the optimality of forest management. On the other hand, forecasting of timber prices is very uncertain. One difficulty when using past time series data in forecasting future timber price development is the possibility of changes in the markets and in the society at large. Expert knowledge can be applied in forecasting of timber prices as information additional to that provided by time series modelling. This paper presents an approach utilising both time series data and expert judgments in modelling future timber prices. A time series model is used as the basis for the approach. Parameters describing future timber price trends, variation in future timber prices, and the probabilities of price peaks taking place in the future are estimated with expert judgments as the basis. A case study involving 12 experts was carried out in Finland, and models were estimated for all the six major timber assortments in the country. The model produced can be utilised in the optimisation calculations of forest planning.
  • Leskinen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Kannus Research Station, P.O. Box 44, FIN-69101 Kannus, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: pekka.leskinen@metla.fi (email)
  • Kangas, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Kannus Research Station, P.O. Box 44, FIN-69101 Kannus, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 605, category Research article
Paul C. Van Deusen. (2001). Scheduling spatial arrangement and harvest simultaneously. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 1 article id 605. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.605
A method based on the Metropolis algorithm is developed for creating desirable spatial configurations on the landscape while simultaneously dealing with other objectives commonly associated with harvest scheduling. Spatial configurations are loosely specified and stochastically attained, which contrasts with other adjacency constraints based on specific block size limits. This method makes it possible to improve habitat and connectivity, and to create buffer zones as part of the scheduling process. It also works with a mapped set of polygons/forest stands and does not require a gridded system.
  • Van Deusen, NCASIS, Northeast Regional Center, 600 Suffolk Street, Fifth Floor, Lowell, MA 01854, USA ORCID ID:E-mail: pvandeusen@ncasi.org (email)
article id 604, category Research article
Dan Glöde & Ulf Sikström. (2001). Two felling methods in final cutting of shelterwood, single-grip harvester productivity and damage to the regeneration. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 1 article id 604. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.604
In order to find an efficient and careful way of final-cutting shelterwoods, two felling methods, in a single-grip harvester system, were compared with respect to productivity and damage caused to the regeneration. The shelterwood (140–165 m3/ha) consisted of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and the natural regeneration (9530–11 780 seedlings/ha) mostly of Norway spruce. Treatments were: (i) conventional felling on both sides of the harvester striproad, preferably in blanks of the regeneration; (ii) felling of the trees top-end first into the striproad using a method named “tossing the caber”. Both treatments included forwarding after felling. Conventional felling had a non-significantly higher productivity (27.4 m3/E15–h) and lower cost (25.9 SEK/m3) than tossing the caber (26.1 m3/E15–h and 27.2 SEK/m3). However, tossing the caber was significantly more efficient in the felling and processing of pine trees compared with conventional felling. The mean proportions of the disappeared and damaged seedlings were approximately 40% after both treatments. The logging-related damage to the regeneration decreased with increased distance to the striproad in the tossing the caber treatment but not in conventional felling. The conclusions were that there were no differences between the treatments regarding productivity, cost and total damage to the regeneration in mixed conifer shelterwoods but that tossing the caber could be a more productive method than conventional felling in pine dominated stands. Tossing the caber could also be beneficial at a regeneration height of 2–3 m since at this height the damage to the regeneration seems less than at conventional felling.
  • Glöde, SkogForsk, Uppsala Science Park, S-751 83 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: dan.glode@skogforsk.se (email)
  • Sikström, SkogForsk, Uppsala Science Park, S-751 83 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 603, category Research article
Kari Minkkinen, Jukka Laine & Hannu Hökkä. (2001). Tree stand development and carbon sequestration in drained peatland stands in Finland – a simulation study. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 1 article id 603. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.603
Drained peatland forests form an important timber resource in Finland. They also form a sink for atmospheric carbon (C) because of the increased growth and C sequestration rates following drainage. These rates have, however, been poorly quantified. We simulated the tree stand dynamics for drained peatland stands with and without cuttings over two stand rotations. Simulations were done on four peatland site types and two regions in Finland with different climatic conditions, using recently published peatland tree growth models applied in a stand simulator. We then calculated the amount of C stored in the stands on the basis of previously published tree-level biomass and C content models. Finally, we developed regression models to estimate C stores in the tree stands using stand stem volume as the predictor variable. In the managed stands, the mean growth (annual volume increment) ranged from 2 to 9 m3 ha–1 a–1, depending on the rotation (first/second), site type and region. Total yield during one rotation varied from 250 to 920 m3 ha–1. The maximum stand volumes varied from 220 to 520 m3 ha–1 in the managed stands and from 360 to 770 m3 ha–1 in the unmanaged. By the end of the first post-drainage rotation the total C store in the managed stands had increased by 6–12 kg C m–2 (i.e. 45–140 g C m–2 a–1) compared to that in the undrained situation. Averaged over two rotations, the increase in the total C store was 3–6 kg C m–2. In the corresponding unmanaged stands the C stores increased by 8–15 kg m–2 over the same periods. At stand level, the C stores were almost linearly related to the stem volume and the developed regression equations could explain the variation in the simulated C stores almost entirely.
  • Minkkinen, University of Helsinki, Department of Forest Ecology, P.O. Box 27, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: kari.minkkinen@helsinki.fi (email)
  • Laine, University of Helsinki, Department of Forest Ecology, P.O. Box 27, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Hökkä, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Rovaniemi Research Station, P.O. Box 16, FIN-96301 Rovaniemi, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 602, category Research article
Teijo Nikkanen. (2001). Reproductive phenology in a Norway spruce seed orchard. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 1 article id 602. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.602
Reproductive phenology was studied in a Norway spruce seed orchard, located in southern Finland (62°13’N, 25°24’E), consisting of 67 clones from northern Finland (64°–67°N). Timing of flowering was determined on the basis of data recorded by a pollen catch meter during 1984–1995, and visual observations made on grafts in 1989, 1992, 1993 and 1995. The genetic and environmental factors affecting female and male phenology, and reproductive synchronisation were studied. The between-year variation in the timing of flowering was more than three weeks. However, when it was defined on the basis of the effective temperature sum, the variation was smaller. No phenological reproductive isolation was found between the seed orchard and surrounding natural forests. The duration of the receptive period of the seed orchard varied from 5 to 8 days, and anthesis determined on the basis of airborne pollen from 5 to 10 days. The receptive period started about one day earlier than anthesis, except in one abnormally warm flowering period when female and male flowering started simultaneously. In general, the flowering periods of the different clones overlapped. The clonal differences in the phenology of receptivity were in most cases statistically significant, but in pollen shedding they were not. The broad-sense heritability estimates were higher for female than for male phenology. Environmental factors, conversely, had a stronger effect on male phenology. A wide graft spacing and a graft position that favoured solar radiation on the lower parts of the crown promoted early pollen shedding and, subsequently, better reproductive synchronisation between female and male flowering.
  • Nikkanen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Punkaharju Research Station, FIN-58451 Punkaharju, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: teijo.nikkanen@metla.fi (email)
article id 601, category Research article
Ricardo Alía, Javier Moro-Serrano & Eduardo Notivol. (2001). Genetic variability of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) provenances in Spain: growth traits and survival. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 1 article id 601. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.601
Plants obtained from seed of 16 Spanish and 6 German provenances of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) were installed at five trial sites distributed throughout the natural range of the species in Spain. Five years after planting (7 years of age) the experimental material was measured for total height, diameter, number of twigs at the fourth year whorl and survival. The analysis confirmed that the rate of height growth of the Spanish is lower than that of the German provenances, whereas for the other traits the best Spanish compare favourably with the Germans. Provenance by site interaction was very significant (P < 0.01) for most traits. Attempts to model the interaction of Spanish provenances on height by simultaneous introduction of some climatic and geographic covariates on both factors were not successful but a multiplicative model with one bilinear term was enough to provide a sensible explanation of this interaction. Usually, provenances closest to each trial site were found better adapted than more distant ones but some provenances of close origin presented a different behaviour. Processes of adaptation and selection of these ancient populations could be considered as the main factors to cause this interaction.
  • Alía, CIFOR-INIA, Unidad de Mejora Forestal, 28080 Madrid, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Moro-Serrano, CIFOR-INIA, Unidad de Mejora Forestal, 28080 Madrid, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail: jmoro@inia.es (email)
  • Notivol, Unidad de Recursos Forestales, SIA-DGA, Ca de Montañana 179, 50080 Zaragoza, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 600, category Research article
Qibin Yu, P. M. A. Tigerstedt & Matti Haapanen. (2001). Growth and phenology of hybrid aspen clones (Populus tremula L. x Populus tremuloides Michx.). Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 1 article id 600. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.600
Height, basal diameter, diameter at breast height, bud burst, and leaf development were recorded in a 5-year-old hybrid aspen clonal trial. The field trial consisted of four aspen hybrid clones (Populus tremula x Populus tremuloides) and one local P. tremula seedling source. Phenological traits were observed in the 3rd year. Growth patterns were recorded during the 3rd and 4th years. Phenological traits were explored in relation to hybrid vigor expressed as growth traits. Differences were observed for phenological and growth traits among hybrid clones and P. tremula. The growth period varied from 143–158 days for the four hybrid clones, and was 112 days for P. tremula. The correlation between growth period and yield was highly significant. The annual growth rate of height for the hybrids was 4.2 cm per 7 days (2.4 for P. tremula) in the 3rd year and 6.4 cm per 7 days (2.9 for P. tremula) in the 4th year. After 5 years, mean estimated stem volume of the hybrids was 3.9 times that of P. tremula. Significant clone by year interaction was observed for height, diameter, and volume growth. The hybrid vigor seems to be mainly attributable to a longer growth period.
  • Yu, Department of Plant Biology, P.O. Box 27, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: qibin.yu@helsinki.fi (email)
  • Tigerstedt, Department of Plant Biology, P.O. Box 27, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Haapanen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, P.O. Box 18, FIN-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 599, category Research article
Chun-Jiang Liu, Carl J. Westman & Hannu Ilvesniemi. (2001). Matter and nutrient dynamics of pine (Pinus tabulaeformis) and oak (Quercus variabilis) litter in North China. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 1 article id 599. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.599
In the mountainous area of North China, a distinguishing feature of climate is the serious drought of spring and the humidity and high temperature of summer by which the litter production and decomposition of forest litter were strongly characterized. We investigated the dynamic and nutrient characteristics of litter in a 30-year-old mixed stand of Chinese pine (Pinus tabulaeformis Carr.) and deciduous orient oak (Quercus variabilis Bl.) and two comparable pure stands. Oak litterfall peaked in November and pine litterfall in December. The oak stand had the largest annual litterfall (347 g m–2) and the forest floor mass (950 g m–2), the mixed stand the second (236 g m–2 and 634 g m–2), and the pine stand the least (217 g m–2 and 615 g m–2). The nutrient return through litterfall and the storage in forest floor followed corresponding order between three stands. The weight loss of pine and oak foliage litter in first year was 25% and 20%. For senesced pine and oak leaves, the translocation rates of N, P and K were 56–83%. Nutrient concentrations were higher in oak leaf litter than pine needle litter, and the concentration of N and Ca appeared to rise while K concentration decreased in both decomposing litter.
  • Liu, Department of Forest Ecology, P.O. Box 27, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: cliu@silvia.helsinki.fi (email)
  • Westman, Department of Forest Ecology, P.O. Box 27, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Ilvesniemi, Department of Forest Ecology, P.O. Box 27, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:

Category: Research note

article id 609, category Research note
Aleksei Fedorkov. (2001). Climatic adaptation of seed maturity in Scots pine and Norway spruce populations. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 1 article id 609. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.609
Seed maturation of Scots pine and Norway spruce in a provenance experiment at Kortkeros (northern Russia) was examined by the X-ray method. Logarithmic relationships were found between seed anatomy development and long-term average thermal sum. Seed development in the northern populations of Scots pine and Norway spruce was a little faster than in the southern ones.
  • Fedorkov, Russian Academy of Sciences, Komi Science Centre, Institute of Biology, Kommunisticheskya St., 28, 167610 Syktyvkar, Russia ORCID ID:E-mail: fedorkov@ib.komisc.ru (email)
article id 608, category Research note
Jouni Partanen, Ilkka Leinonen & Tapani Repo. (2001). Effect of accumulated duration of the light period on bud burst in Norway spruce (Picea abies) of varying ages. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 1 article id 608. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.608
One-year-old seedlings (two sowing times), two-year-old seedlings and 14- and 18-year-old cuttings of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) were exposed to shortening photoperiod (initially 16 h), lengthening photoperiod (initially 6 h) and constant short photoperiod (6 h) treatments with uniform temperature conditions in growth chambers. The timing of bud burst was examined. In all plants, shortening photoperiod treatment seemed to promote bud burst compared with other treatments. This effect was clearest in the oldest material. The results suggest that, in addition to temperature sum, the accumulated duration of the light period may promote bud burst of Norway spruce.
  • Partanen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Punkaharju Research Station, Finlandiantie 18, FIN-58450 Punkaharju, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: jouni.partanen@metla.fi (email)
  • Leinonen, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forestry, P.O. Box 111, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Repo, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forestry, P.O. Box 111, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:

Category: Discussion article

article id 610, category Discussion article
Risto Päivinen & Perttu Anttila. (2001). How reliable is a satellite forest inventory? Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 1 article id 610. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.610
  • Päivinen, European Forest Institute, Torikatu 34, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: risto.paivinen@efi.fi (email)
  • Anttila, European Forest Institute, Torikatu 34, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:

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