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Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 3 | 2000

Category: Research article

article id 630, category Research article
S. Samarasinghe & G. D. Kulasiri. (2000). Displacement fields of wood in tension based on image processing: Part 2. Crack-tip displacements in mode-I and mixed-mode fracture. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 3 article id 630. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.630
Near tip displacement fields for tensile loaded cracked rubber and wood with a crack parallel-, perpendicular-to-grain, and a parallel-to-grain crack inclined 30°, 45°, and 60° to the load axis were obtained from digital image correlation (DIC). Theoretical displacements were also obtained for rubber and wood using isotropic and orthotropic fracture theory, respectively. The results showed that DIC can reveal fine details of the nature of displacements and the influences of crack tip in both rubber and wood. Experimental crack tip displacements for wood compare well with theory; particularly, when load is perpendicular-to-grain. Some anomalies were found in the tip displacements in the direction of the tracheids due to the unique nature of their behaviour not accounted for by theory. Mixed-mode crack tip displacement fields for wood clearly showed the increasing influence of crack angle on the displacements, and the displacements perpendicular to crack compared very well with theory. The displacements parallel to crack showed some variations owing to the involvement of tracheids.
  • Samarasinghe, Lincoln University, Appl. Computing, Mathematics and Statistics Group, P.O. Box 84, Canterbury, New Zealand ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kulasiri, Lincoln University, Appl. Computing, Mathematics and Statistics Group, P.O. Box 84, Canterbury, New Zealand ORCID ID:E-mail: kulasird@tui.lincoln.ac.nz (email)
article id 629, category Research article
S. Samarasinghe & G. D. Kulasiri. (2000). Displacement fields of wood in tension based on image processing: Part 1. Tension parallel- and perpendicular- to grain and comparisons with isotropic behaviour. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 3 article id 629. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.629
Displacement fields for tensile loaded rubber and wood in parallel- and perpendicular-to-grain were obtained from digital image correlation. The results showed that the digital image correlation can reveal fine details of the nature of displacements in both rubber and wood. It was found that when load is perpendicular-to-grain, the lignin matrix produces uniform displacement fields similar to that of isotropic rubber. Uniform displacement fields also observed when lignin is involved in contraction due to Poisson effect in parallel-to-grain tension. However, when tracheids carry the load in parallel-to-grain loading, or are compressed in perpendicular-to-grain loading, a complex displacement pattern distorted by internal shear stress and slippage is produced.
  • Samarasinghe, Lincoln University, Appl. Computing, Mathematics and Statistics Group, P.O. Box 84, Canterbury, New Zealand ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kulasiri, Lincoln University, Appl. Computing, Mathematics and Statistics Group, P.O. Box 84, Canterbury, New Zealand ORCID ID:E-mail: kulasird@tui.lincoln.ac.nz (email)
article id 628, category Research article
Stefan Daume & Dave Robertson. (2000). A heuristic approach to modelling thinnings. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 3 article id 628. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.628
Thinnings play an important role in guiding forest development and are considered by many to be the most important influence on forests in Central Europe. Due to their importance, thinning models are a major part of any forest growth model for managed forests. Existing thinning model approaches have a number of problems associated with structure and model development that weaken their reliability and accuracy. To overcome some of these problems this paper proposes a heuristic approach to modelling thinnings, where the focus is on distance-dependent, single-tree models. This alternative approach tries to capture the information, strategies and deductive processes likely to be employed by a forester deciding on the removal of individual trees in a stand. Use of heuristics to represent thinning knowledge simplifies the construction and refinement of a thinning model and increases its plausibility. The representation of thinning heuristics in Prolog – a programming language based on formal logic – is a straightforward process without losing expressiveness of the original heuristics. Limited tests of the model implemented in Prolog indicate that the proposed model outperforms its competitors.
  • Daume, The University of Edinburgh, Institute for Representation and Reasoning, Division of Informatics, 80 South Bridge, Edinburgh EH1 1HN, United Kingdom ORCID ID:E-mail: stefand@dai.ed.ac.uk (email)
  • Robertson, The University of Edinburgh, Institute for Representation and Reasoning, Division of Informatics, 80 South Bridge, Edinburgh EH1 1HN, United Kingdom ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 627, category Research article
Joseph Buongiorno, Audra Kolbe & Mike Vasievich. (2000). Economic and ecological effects of diameter-limit and BDq management regimes: simulation results for northern hardwoods. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 3 article id 627. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.627
The long-term financial and ecological effects of diameter-limit regimes and basal-area-diameter-q-ratio (BDq) regimes were compared by simulation in the case of northern hardwood forests. Varying the cutting cycle between 10 and 20 years had little effect on returns or stand structure. A 28-cm diameter-limit cut gave the highest production and financial returns, and the highest species diversity, but considerably lower size diversity. A 38-cm diameter-limit cut and a heavy BDq selection harvest gave high returns, while maintaining high levels of diversity. On lands of equal site quality, Michigan’s stands were more productive than Wisconsin’s. The results suggest that it is possible to manage northern hardwood stands sustainably with diameter-limit cuts, combined with removal of poorly performing understory trees. Adjusting the diameter limit gave rise to stands similar in productivity and structure to those obtained by BDq cutting regimes. Given their simplicity of implementation and monitoring, more attention should be given to diameter-limit cutting regimes, with attendant stand improvement measures, as a practical means for uneven-aged management of northern hardwoods.
  • Buongiorno, Department of Forest Ecology and Management, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1630 Linden Drive, Madison, WI 53705, USA ORCID ID:E-mail: Jbuongio@facstaff.wisc.edu (email)
  • Kolbe, Department of Forest Ecology and Management, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1630 Linden Drive, Madison, WI 53705, USA ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Vasievich, USDA Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station, 1407 S. Harrison Road, Suite 220, East Lansing, MI 48823, USA ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 626, category Research article
Teijo Nikkanen & Seppo Ruotsalainen. (2000). Variation in flowering abundance and its impact on the genetic diversity of the seed crop in a Norway spruce seed orchard. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 3 article id 626. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.626
The variation in flowering abundance was studied in a Norway spruce seed orchard, located in southern Finland (62°13'N, 25°24'E), consisting of 67 clones from northern Finland (64°–67°N). The flowering variation in 1984–1996 was studied at the annual, clonal and graft level. In addition, the genetic diversity of an imaginary seed crop was estimated using a concept of status number. The between-year variation was large in both female and male flowering. Differences in flowering abundance among the clones were large and statistically significant in all the years studied. The average broad-sense heritability values for female and male flowering were 0.37 and 0.38, respectively, but varied considerably from year to year. The correlations between the flowering abundance of the clones in different years were usually positive and significant. However, the correlations for two pairs of successive good flowering years showed that the same clones usually flowered well in the first year in both pairs of years, and the other clones in the second year. The clonal differences in flowering could not be explained by geographic origin, but were more dependent on the graft size. Our results demonstrate that the variation in the ramet number, flowering abundance and pollen contamination must be included when estimating the genetic diversity of the seed crop in a seed orchard. The relative status number of the seed orchard was 84% of the number of clones when the variation in the ramet number was included. The relative status numbers after adjusting for the variation in female and male flowering were on the average 46 and 55%, respectively, and 59% when adjusting for both genders together. Pollen contamination increased the status number considerably.
  • Nikkanen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Punkaharju Research Station, FIN-58450 Punkaharju, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: teijo.nikkanen@metla.fi (email)
  • Ruotsalainen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Punkaharju Research Station, FIN-58450 Punkaharju, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 625, category Research article
Hans-Örjan Nohrstedt. (2000). Effects of soil scarification and previous N fertilisation on pools of inorganic N in soil after clear-felling of a Pinus sylvestris (L.) stand. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 3 article id 625. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.625
Previous analyses of soil water beneath mounds resulting from scarification have implied that this forestry measure increases leaching of inorganic N. However, more recent soil-water studies have not confirmed this assumption. The soil study presented here examined the pools of inorganic N in different microsites emanating from a simulated disc trenching, i. e. the mound with underlying soil, the furrow bottom and the undisturbed soil. The study was made five years after scarification. The mound itself with underlying soil had a larger pool of inorganic N than the undisturbed soil. This was mainly because of an increase in the embedded humus layer, thus implying a larger net N mineralisation and/or lower losses. However, when pools of inorganic N per hectare were calculated, taking into consideration that a scarified area comprises 25% mounds, 25% furrows and 50% undisturbed soil, there was no increase in pools of inorganic N when compared with an area not subjected to scarification. This observation supports the finding of the more recent soil-water studies mentioned, i. e., that leaching seems not to be influenced by soil scarification. The scarification was made as a split-plot treatment on main-plots in an old experiment with different N doses. Thus, the effect of the previous N fertilisation could also be evaluated. Two N doses were tested beside the unfertilised control: 720N (3 x 240 kg N ha–1 yr–1) and 1800N (3 x 600 kg N ha–1 yr–1). The last fertiliser application was made six years before the clearcutting and 13 years before the soil sampling. The previously fertilised main-plots had larger pools of inorganic N than the control plots.
  • Nohrstedt, The Forestry Research Institute of Sweden, Uppsala Science Park, SE-751 83 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: hans-orjan.nohrstedt@skogforsk.se (email)

Category: Review article

article id 632, category Review article
William F. Hyde & Gunnar Köhlin. (2000). Social forestry reconsidered. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 3 article id 632. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.632
This paper reviews the expectations for forestry’s contribution to rural development – and for its special contributions to the most disadvantaged, to women and the landless users of the forest commons. A growing literature challenges some of these expectations; in particular, certain expectations about cultural differences and physical stocks as explanatory factors for patterns of household behavior. This literature could also be used to support a call for sharper definitions of deforestation, improved indicators of the effects of forest resources on the rural poor, and improved design of forest policy interventions. Our paper reviews the literature, suggests some unifying themes, and identifies the critical issues that remain unanswered. The primary contention arising from this literature is that households follow systematic patterns of economic behavior in their consumption and production of forest resources, and that policy interventions in social forestry should be analyzed with regard to markets, policies, and institutions. Markets for forest resources generally exist in some form – although they may be thin. Successful forestry projects and policies require careful identification of the target populations and careful estimation of market and market-related effects on the household behavior of these populations. Institutional structures that assure secure rights for scarce forest resources are uniquely important in a forest enviornment often characterized by open access resources and weak government administration. Social and community forestry, improved stoves, improved strains of multi-purpose trees, and even private commercial forest operations can all improve local welfare, but only where scarcity is correctly identified and the appropriate institutions are in place. An increasing number of observations of afforestation from developing countries around the world is evidence that forestry activities do satisfy these conditions in selective important cases. The critical point for policy is to identify the characteristics of these successful cases that are predictive of other cases where new forestry activities can be welfare enhancing.
  • Hyde, Centre for International Forestry Research, Bogor, Indonesia ORCID ID:E-mail: wfhyde@aol.com (email)
  • Köhlin, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:

Category: Research note

article id 631, category Research note
Pekka Ripatti. (2000). Use of log-linear models in forecasting structural changes in Finnish non-industrial private forest ownership. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 3 article id 631. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.631
This paper presents how log-linear models can be used for modelling and forecasting structural changes of Finnish non-industrial private forest ownership. Two cross-sectional sets of data, which were collected in conjunction with two separate surveys by means of mail questionnaires in 1975 and 1990, were employed. A total of six non-industrial private forest holding and ownership attributes are forecast focusing on the earlier pace of structural change. The results show that the pace of change in the forecast attributes appears to be less than it would be when derived from extrapolation of the earlier trends. The results of the study can be applied to forest policy and forestry extension planning, by providing a more realistic outlook of the future structure of non-industrial private forest ownership.
  • Ripatti, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Helsinki Research Centre, Unioninkatu 40 A, FIN-00170 Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: pekka.ripatti@metla.fi (email)

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