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Silva Fennica vol. 33 no. 1 | 1999

Category: Research article

article id 671, category Research article
Jouni Vettenranta & Jari Miina. (1999). Optimizing thinnings and rotation of Scots pine and Norway spruce mixtures. Silva Fennica vol. 33 no. 1 article id 671. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.671
The study describes a simulation-optimization system which uses spatial models for diameter and height growth, crown ratio and tree mortality for Scots pine and Norway spruce mixtures. The optimal one- and two-thinning regimes of six initial stands with varing species composition were solved by using nonlinear optimization. The soil expectation value (SEV) at 3% interest rate was used as a management objective. The regimes are determined by taking into account the stand basal areas before the thinnings, the removal percentages for small, medium-sized and large pines and spruces, and the stand basal area before the final felling. The greatest SEV (8900 FIM ha–1) was attained with the initial stand where the proportion of pines was 65% of the number of the stems. In the two-thinning regime, the first thinning was conducted at the age of 39 years when the stand basal area was 37 m2 ha–1 and the dominant height was about 15 m. After the thinning, the basal area was 27 m2 ha–1. Spruces were thinned from below, but both small and large pines were removed. The second thinning was 8 years later and much heavier: the stand basal area was decreased from 35 m2 ha–1 to 18 m2 ha–1 by removing both small and large pines and spruces. When the optimal two-thinning regime was compared to the regime presented by Forest Centre Tapio, the loss of SEV was about 30% (6070 FIM ha–1) in the case of thinnings from below, and about 20% (7250 FIM ha–1) in the case of thinnings from above.
  • Vettenranta, Kivirinnanpolku 4, FIN-40950 Muurame, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: vettenr@cc.joensuu.fi (email)
  • Miina, Faculty of Forestry, University of Joensuu, P.O. Box 111, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 670, category Research article
Jouni Vettenranta. (1999). Distance-dependent models for predicting the development of mixed coniferous forests in Finland. Silva Fennica vol. 33 no. 1 article id 670. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.670
Distance-dependent growth models and crown models, based on extensive material, were built for Scots pine and Norway spruce growing in a mixed forest. The crown ratio was also used as a predictor in a diameter growth model to better describe the thinning reaction. The effect of crown ratio on the growth dynamics was studied in simulation examples. Monte Carlo simulation was used to correct the bias caused by nonlinear transformations of predictors and response. After thinnings the crown ratio as a predictor was found to be a clear growth-retarding factor. The growth retarding effect was stronger among pines with thinnings from below, whereas the estimated yield of spruces over rotation was slightly greater when the crown ratio was included than without it. With each type of thinning the effect of crown ratio on pine growth was almost the same, but the growth of spruces was clearly delayed when the stand was thinned from above. Simulation examples also showed that it is profitable to raise the proportion of spruces during rotation, since spruces maintain the growth more vigorous at older ages. The total yield during 90 years rotation was about 20% higher if the stand was transformed into a pure spruce stand instead of pine.
  • Vettenranta, Kivirinnanpolku 4, FIN-40950 Muurame, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: vettenr@cc.joensuu.fi (email)
article id 669, category Research article
Simo Poso, Guangxing Wang & Sakari Tuominen. (1999). Weighting alternative estimates when using multi-source auxiliary data for forest inventory. Silva Fennica vol. 33 no. 1 article id 669. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.669
Five auxiliary data sources (Landsat TM, IRS-IC, digitized aerial photographs, visual photo-interpretation and old forest compartment information) applying three study areas and three estimators, two-phase sampling with stratification, the k nearest neighbors and regression estimator, were examined. Auxiliary data were given for a high number of sample plots, which are here called first phase sample plots. The plots were distributed using a systematic grid over the study areas. Some of the plots were then measured in the field for the necessary ground truth. Each auxiliary data source in combination with field sample information was applied to produce a specific estimator for five forest stand characteristics: mean diameter, mean height, age, basal area, and volume of the growing stock. When five auxiliary data sources were used, each stand characteristic and each first phase sample plot were supplied with five alternative estimates with three alternative estimators. Mean square errors were then calculated for each alternative estimator using the cross validation method. The final estimates were produced by weighting alternative estimates inversely according to the mean square errors related to the corresponding estimator. The result was better than the final estimate of any of the single estimators. The improvement over the best single estimate, as measured in mean square error, was 16.9% on average for all five forest stand characteristics. The improvement was fairly equal for all five forest stand characteristics. Only minor differences among the accuracies of the three alternative estimators were recorded.
  • Poso, Department of Forest Resource Management, P.O. Box 24 (Unioninkatu 40 B), FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: simo.poso@helsinki.fi (email)
  • Wang, Department of Forest Resource Management, P.O. Box 24 (Unioninkatu 40 B), FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Tuominen, Department of Forest Resource Management, P.O. Box 24 (Unioninkatu 40 B), FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 668, category Research article
Hannu Hökkä & Timo Penttilä. (1999). Modelling the dynamics of wood productivity on drained peatland sites in Finland. Silva Fennica vol. 33 no. 1 article id 668. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.668
The dynamics of wood productivity on drained peatland sites was analyzed from the covariance structure generated by stand yield data of repeatedly measured permanent sample plots in 81 Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) or Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst. (L.)) stands with admixtures of birch (Betula pubescens Ehrh.). The site production potential, considered a latent variable, was assumed to follow an autoregressive process over time elapsed since drainage. As a measure of the latent variable, a relative growth rate (RGR) index was determined for all stands at the time of drainage and at four successive measurement time points following drainage (on average 16, 23, 30, and 41 years). The index was calculated as the site index of an upland conifer stand with the ratio of periodic volume growth and standing volume and adjusted by changes in stand stocking and thinning. The observed covariance structure was described by fitting a structural equation model to the data of RGR indices. When only the post-drainage measurement times were included, a quasi-simplex model with equal error variances and equal structural parameters at different measurement times fit the data well indicating a permanent covariance structure among the different measurements. Including the measurement at the time of drainage resulted in a non-permanent structure. The stand parameters at the time of drainage were poorly correlated with post-drainage growth. A considerable increase in the wood productivity of the sites was observed, being greatest during twenty years after drainage and continuing up to 40 years since drainage. This was concluded to be due to changes in site properties rather than stand structure although the effects of the single factors could not be analytically separated from one another. Our modelling approach appeared to improve long-term site productivity estimates based merely on botanical site indices.
  • Hökkä, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Rovaniemi Research Station, PO Box 16, 96301 Rovaniemi, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: hannu.hokka@metla.fi (email)
  • Penttilä, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Rovaniemi Research Station, PO Box 16, 96301 Rovaniemi, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 667, category Research article
Timo Kärki. (1999). Predicting the value of grey alder (Alnus incana) logs based on external quality. Silva Fennica vol. 33 no. 1 article id 667. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.667
The quality of grey alder logs (Alnus incana) was studied by sawing sample logs from two different forests in November 1995–February 1996. For grading of grey alder logs and sawn timber the proposed system of Keinänen and Tahvanainen (1995) plus the reject -grade was used. In general, grey alder logs have knots from the base to the top. All types of knots appear, and the length of the knot-free section is small at the base. In small-dimensioned logs there are fewer knots than in larger logs. Especially in large top logs, there were many more fresh knots than in other types of logs. Evidently, in different types of logs the different grades of sawn timber are located in comparable sections along the length. It also seems that the worse the grade class was, the longer was also the length of the class. The most common reasons for decreasing grade were dry knots and discoloration.
  • Kärki, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forestry, P.O. BOX 111, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: timo.karki@forest.joensuu.fi (email)
article id 666, category Research article
Rolf Pape. (1999). Influence of thinning on spiral grain in Norway spruce grown on highly productive sites in southern Sweden. Silva Fennica vol. 33 no. 1 article id 666. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.666
Grain spirality was investigated in eight stands of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) subjected to different thinning regimes. The dominating general pattern of spiral grain found in this study was typical for conifers, with a maximum of left-handed spirality close to the pith, which decreased towards the bark and sometimes changed to right-handed spiral grain in the outer growth rings. However, there was a large amount of between-tree variation in spiral grain. The effect of thinning on grain spirality was investigated by relating annual ring width to spiral grain, since thinning affects growth rate. A positive correlation between ring width and grain angle was found, but a considerable number of trees showed no or a negative correlation. A statistically significant effect of ring width was only found in five of the eight stands. Heavy thinnings, removing 60% of the basal area of a stand, considerably increased spiral grain, whereas the effects of light thinnings were inconsistent. These results support the findings of earlier studies indicating that spiral grain formation is under considerable genetic control, while its expression can be changed by silvicultural methods which affect growth rate.
  • Pape, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Forest Yield Research, P.O. Box 7061, S-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: rolf.pape@sprod.slu.se (email)

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