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Silva Fennica 1926-1997
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Articles containing the keyword 'Eucalypt'.

Category: Research article

article id 1141, category Research article
Isabel Miranda, Jorge Gominho, Helena Pereira. (2015). Heartwood, sapwood and bark variation in coppiced Eucalyptus globulus trees in 2nd rotation and comparison with the single-stem 1st rotation. Silva Fennica vol. 49 no. 1 article id 1141. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1141
Highlights: Coppiced E. globulus trees in the 2nd rotation have similar heartwood and sapwood development as single-stem trees in the 1st rotation; The initial tree planting density did not influence heartwood development of coppiced E. globulus trees; Heartwood diameter and height can be modelled with tree diameter and height respectively; Sapwood width is approximately constant within and between coppice and single-stem E. globulus trees.
Coppiced Eucalyptus globulus trees with 18 years in a 2nd rotation were analysed in relation to heartwood, sapwood and bark content taking into account the effect of the initial planting density by using a spacing trial. A total of 25 stumps, with a variable number of stems per stump from 1 to 3, were analysed. Comparison was made to the previous 1st rotation single stem trees, also harvested at 18 years. In the 2nd rotation, the stump density did not significantly affect stem height and diameter, in opposition to the 1st rotation where spacing significantly impacted on tree dimensions. The effect of the initial planting density is somewhat lost in the coppiced stand in relation with i.e. the number of stems per stump. Heartwood was present in all the coppiced trees up to 49.9% of the total tree height and heartwood volume amounted to 38.9–51.7% of the total tree volume. Within the tree, heartwood content decreased from the base upwards, representing, on average, 54.1% at the base and decreasing to 5.1% at 15.3 m. The sapwood width remained relatively constant with an average radial width of approximately 2 cm. The average stem bark content of coppiced trees was 17.4% of the total stem volume. The comparison of heartwood and sapwood development in the coppiced trees did not show significant differences to the 1st rotation trees, nor did the initial spacing. Heartwood diameter could be modelled using the tree diameter both for 1st and 2nd rotation trees.
  • Miranda, Centro de Estudos Florestais, Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Universidade Lisboa, 1349-017 Lisboa, Portugal ORCID ID:E-mail: Imiranda@isa.ulisboa.pt
  • Gominho, Centro de Estudos Florestais, Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Universidade Lisboa, 1349-017 Lisboa, Portugal ORCID ID:E-mail: Jgominho@isa.utl.pt (email)
  • Pereira, Centro de Estudos Florestais, Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Universidade Lisboa, 1349-017 Lisboa, Portugal ORCID ID:E-mail: Hpereira@isa.utl.pt
article id 32, category Research article
Susete Marques, Jordi Garcia-Gonzalo, José G. Borges, Brigite Botequim, M. Manuela Oliveira, José Tomé, Margarida Tomé. (2011). Developing post-fire Eucalyptus globulus stand damage and tree mortality models for enhanced forest planning in Portugal. Silva Fennica vol. 45 no. 1 article id 32. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.32
Forest and fire management planning activities are carried out mostly independently of each other. This paper discusses research aiming at the development of methods and tools that can be used for enhanced integration of forest and fire management planning activities. Specifically, fire damage models were developed for Eucalyptus globulus Labill stands in Portugal. Models are based on easily measurable forest characteristics so that forest managers may predict post-fire mortality based on forest structure. For this purpose, biometric data and fire-damage descriptors from 2005/2006 National Forest Inventory plots and other sample plots within 2006, 2007 and 2008 fire areas were used. A three-step modelling strategy based on logistic regression methods was used. In the first step, a model was developed to predict whether mortality occurs after a wildfire in a eucalypt stand. In the second step the degree of damage caused by wildfires in stands where mortality occurs is quantified (i.e. percentage of mortality). In the third step this mortality is distributed among trees. Data from over 85 plots and 1648 trees were used for modeling purposes. The damage models show that relative damage increases with stand basal area. Tree level mortality models indicate that trees with high diameters, in dominant positions and located in regular stands are less prone to die when a wildfire occurs.
  • Marques, Technical University of Lisbon, School of Agriculture, Forest Research Center, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-017 Lisboa, Portugal ORCID ID:E-mail: smarques@isa.utl.pt (email)
  • Garcia-Gonzalo, Technical University of Lisbon, School of Agriculture, Forest Research Center, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-017 Lisboa, Portugal ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Borges, Technical University of Lisbon, School of Agriculture, Forest Research Center, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-017 Lisboa, Portugal ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Botequim, Technical University of Lisbon, School of Agriculture, Forest Research Center, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-017 Lisboa, Portugal ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Oliveira, Technical University of Lisbon, School of Agriculture, Forest Research Center, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-017 Lisboa, Portugal ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Tomé, Technical University of Lisbon, School of Agriculture, Forest Research Center, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-017 Lisboa, Portugal ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Tomé, Technical University of Lisbon, School of Agriculture, Forest Research Center, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-017 Lisboa, Portugal ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 187, category Research article
Tobias Biechele, Leif Nutto, Gero Becker. (2009). Growth strain in Eucalyptus nitens at different stages of development. Silva Fennica vol. 43 no. 4 article id 187. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.187
Eucalypts are renowned for their high growth stress levels. These stresses cause splitting, warping and dimensional instability when cutting, processing and drying the wood. In Chile, large Eucalyptus nitens plantations can be found, which, due to these problems, are scarcely utilised for solid wood products (veneer, sawn wood). This study aims to determine the factors influencing growth stress at different stages of tree’s development, and to identify whether the factors influencing growth stress change over time. In five stands of different ages, growth strain, as an indicator of growth stress, was measured at different tree heights with the single hole drilling method. The tree variables DBH, tree height, slenderness (height/diameter ratio) and crown parameters also were measured. A correlation analysis of tree variables and growth strains was undertaken. The results obtained indicate a high variability in growth strain values. It was concluded that growth strain is not correlated with a single growth parameter, but with a combination of factors that variously influence it at different ages and tree heights.
  • Biechele, University of Freiburg, Institute of Forest Utilisation and Work Science, Werthmannstr. 6, DE-79085 Freiburg, Germany ORCID ID:E-mail: tobias.biechele@fobawi.uni-freiburg.de (email)
  • Nutto, University of Freiburg, Institute of Forest Utilisation and Work Science, Werthmannstr. 6, DE-79085 Freiburg, Germany ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Becker, University of Freiburg, Institute of Forest Utilisation and Work Science, Werthmannstr. 6, DE-79085 Freiburg, Germany ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 262, category Research article
Julian C. Fox, Huiquan Bi, Peter K. Ades. (2008). Modelling spatial dependence in an irregular natural forest. Silva Fennica vol. 42 no. 1 article id 262. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.262
The spatial dependence present in a natural stand of Eucalyptus pilularis (Smith) dominated mixed species forest was characterised and modelled. Two wildfires imposed a significant spatial dependence on the post disturbance stand. It was hypothesised that spatial variation in the intensity of the wildfires generated the observed structures. The influence of patch formation, micro-site variability and competitive influences were also noted in the residuals of a distance-dependent individual-tree growth model. A methodology capable of modelling these complicated patterns of observed dependence was sought, and candidates included the spatial interaction, direct specification and Papadakis methods. The spatial interaction method with a moving average autoregression was identified as the most appropriate method for explicitly modelling spatial dependence. Both the direct specification and Papadakis methods failed to capture the influence of competition. This study highlights the possibility that stand disturbances such as natural and artificial fires, insect and fungal attacks, and wind and snow damage are capable of imposing powerful spatial dependencies on the post disturbance stand. These dependencies need to be considered if individual tree growth models are to provide valid predictions in disturbed stands.
  • Fox, School of Forest and Ecosystem Science, University of Melbourne, Burnley Campus, 500 Yarra Blvd, Richmond, Victoria 3121 Australia ORCID ID:E-mail: jcfox@unimelb.edu.au (email)
  • Bi, Forest Resources Research, New South Wales Department of Primary Industries, PO Box 100, Beecroft, NSW 2119 Australia ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Ades, School of Forest and Ecosystem Science, University of Melbourne, Burnley Campus, 500 Yarra Blvd, Richmond, Victoria 3121 Australia ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 437, category Research article
Raffaele Spinelli, Philip M. O. Owende, Shane M. Ward, Maximiano Tornero. (2004). Comparison of short-wood forwarding systems used in Iberia. Silva Fennica vol. 38 no. 1 article id 437. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.437
Time studies were conducted to quantify the productivity and the operational cost of mechanized wood extraction in the Iberian Eucalyptus plantations. The key objectives were: to determine the significant variables that influence machine productivity and extraction costs in shortwood transport within the forest and to find the basis for optimization of shortwood transport with respect to Eucalyptus forest stands. Three machines were selected for study, each representative of the different log forwarding regimes that are used in Iberia and that could be extended to most of Southern Europe. These were: 1) a modified articulated dumper, 2) a purpose-built forwarder and 3) a farm tractor paired to a twin-axle forestry trailer. It was observed that the productivity and the cost of shortwood extraction may vary from 6 to 15 fresh tonnes/SMH and 3.5 to 6.5 Euro/fresh tonne, respectively. It was estimated that the optimal extraction route network covered approximately 10% of the forest surface. It was also observed that the modified dumper is the most-productive unit, and given its higher speed (> 5 km/h) and larger payload (16 tonnes), it is the economic choice for extraction distances in excess of 1000 m. However, it also generates the most severe rutting, hence it should be used with caution. For extraction distances below 1000 m, the light purpose-built forwarder compares favourably with the modified dumper, while generating less than half the site disturbance. The tractor-trailer combination is economically inferior to the modified dumper and the light forwarder, and should be regarded as a complement to the main extraction fleet and where short-haul operations are required. Under the assumptions of the study, light forwarders (8-tonne payload) may become competitive with heavier ones when road density is at least 6 m/ha, so that extraction distance does not exceed 1 km. This study provides a model for estimating the productivity and the cost of timber forwarding under varying conditions.
  • Spinelli, CNR - Timber and Tree Institute, Via Madonna del Piano - Pal. F, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Italy; University College Dublin, Ireland ORCID ID:E-mail: spinelli@ivalsa.cnr.it (email)
  • Owende, Dept. of Agricultural and Food Engineering, University College Dublin, Earlsfort Terrace, Dublin 2, Ireland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Ward, Dept. of Agricultural and Food Engineering, University College Dublin, Earlsfort Terrace, Dublin 2, Ireland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Tornero, Servicios Forestales SA, Ctra. SE-184 Km 0.63, E-41970 Santiponce, Sevilla, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail:

Category: Research note

article id 223, category Research note
Bum-Jin Park, Takeshi Morikawa, Tomohiro Ogata, Kenji Washida, Mario Iwamoto, Hirohiko Nakamura, Yoshifumi Miyazaki. (2009). Physiological effects of ingesting eucalyptus essential oil with milk casein peptide. Silva Fennica vol. 43 no. 1 article id 223. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.223
This study was conducted to clarify the effect of eucalyptus essential oil mixed with milk casein peptide food for human physiological relaxation. Fifteen male university students (21.2 ± 0.9 yr) participated in study as subjects. The subjects were given one of two types of experimental drink (peptide + eucalyptus flavor (Pep + EF), and peptide + grapefruit·orange flavor (Pep + G·O), each flavor contains natural essential oil). We measured the change in salivary cortisol concentration and POMS scores before and two hours after taking experimental drink. The results of a Type A behavior pattern test were used to classify subjects. The concentration of salivary cortisol decreased significantly two hours after taking Pep + EF. And Type B showed bigger change than Type A. In conclusion, the results show that eucalyptus essential oil has the effect of relaxation, and that the effects on Type A and Type B are different.
  • Park, Chiba University, Center for Environment, Health and Field Sciences, 277-0882 Kashiwa, Chiba, Japan ORCID ID:E-mail: bjpark@faculty.chiba-u.jp (email)
  • Morikawa, Chiba University, Center for Environment, Health and Field Sciences, 277-0882 Kashiwa, Chiba, Japan ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Ogata, Chiba University, Center for Environment, Health and Field Sciences, 277-0882 Kashiwa, Chiba, Japan ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Washida, Chiba University, Center for Environment, Health and Field Sciences, 277-0882 Kashiwa, Chiba, Japan ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Iwamoto, Chiba University, Center for Environment, Health and Field Sciences, 277-0882 Kashiwa, Chiba, Japan ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Nakamura, Chiba University, Center for Environment, Health and Field Sciences, 277-0882 Kashiwa, Chiba, Japan ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Miyazaki, Chiba University, Center for Environment, Health and Field Sciences, 277-0882 Kashiwa, Chiba, Japan ORCID ID:E-mail:

Category: Article

article id 5558, category Article
Kari Tuomela, Markku Kanninen. (1995). Effects of vapour pressure deficit and soil water content on leaf water potential between selected provenances of Eucalyptus microtheca in an irrigated plantation, eastern Kenya. Silva Fennica vol. 29 no. 3 article id 5558. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a9209

The aim of the study was to compare the behaviour of three selected provenances of Eucalyptus microtheca F. Muell. that were likely to respond differently to drought. For this purpose, we studied the effects of vapour pressure deficit and soil water content on leaf water potential in an irrigated plantation in Bura, eastern Kenya.

An international provenance trial of Eucalyptus microtheca, established as a part of Finnida-supported Bura Forestry Research Project in eastern Kenya in 1984 was used as a plant material in the study. The eastern provenance showed generally the lowest leaf water potential on a daily basis. Statistically significant differences in the daily leaf water potential fluctuations were detected. The eastern provenance exhibited the greatest and the northern one the smallest values. The minimum daily leaf water potential of the provenances responded well to changes in gravimetric soil water content, the western provenance being the most sensitive one. The relationship of the observed results and annual rainfall distribution in the geographic regions of the studied provenances is discussed.

  • Tuomela, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kanninen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5424, category Article
Timo Pukkala, Veli Pohjonen. (1990). Use of linear programming in land use planning in the Ethiopian highlands. Silva Fennica vol. 24 no. 2 article id 5424. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15578

Linear programming was used to analyse the land use alternatives in the Debre Birhan Fuelwood Plantation area, in the central highlands of Ethiopia. The region represents a rural, high-altitude area, where the main land uses are grazing and cultivation of barley, wheat and pulses. To alleviate fuelwood shortage, large plantations of Eucalyptus globulus Labill. have been established. Livestock has traditionally used the major part of the production capacity of the sites. A decrease in the number of cattle would facilitate a considerable increase in the production of cereals, pulses, fuelwood and construction timber. The optimal share of the land for arable crops, grazing and tree plantations would be about 40, 45 and 15% respectively.

The PDF includes an abstract in Finnish.

  • Pukkala, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Pohjonen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5363, category Article
Veli Pohjonen, Timo Pukkala. (1988). Profitability of establishing Eucalyptus globulus plantations in the Central Highlands of Ethiopia. Silva Fennica vol. 22 no. 4 article id 5363. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15520

The economic analysis is based on computer simulations which covered a seedling rotation and three successive coppice rotations. Calculations were carried out for the four site productivity classes in Eucalyptus globulus plantations. The rotation length that maximized the land expectation value is 12–20 years for seedling rotation and 8–16 years for coppice rotations with discounting rates 2–8%. The mean wood production is over 40 m3/ha/a in the best site class and about 10 m3/ha/a in the poorest class with rotation lengths ranging from 10 to over 20 years. Thinnings increase the wood production and land expectation value by a few percentage points. In areas suitable to Eucalyptus globulus growth, the land expectation value is considerably higher in forestry than in agriculture, except in very poor areas or with very high rate of interest.

The PDF includes an abstract in Finnish.

  • Pohjonen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Pukkala, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 7661, category Article
Jesada Luangjame. (1990). Salinity effects in Eucalyptus camaldulensis and Combretum quadrangulare: ecophysiological and morphological studies. Acta Forestalia Fennica no. 214 article id 7661. https://doi.org/10.14214/aff.7661

The aim of this study was to investigate the ecophysiological and morphological characteristics of two salt-tolerant tree species, Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehn. and Combretum quadrangulare Kurz. A greenhouse experiment with different levels of NaCl salinity (0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0%) was set up and the results were compared with those of a field study on non-saline and saline soils. The determination of optimum gas exchange and the development and evaluation of photosynthetic models with and without water deficit were also included in this study.

Morphological characteristics under saline conditions showed that shoot height and diameter growth, shoot internode length, root length/biomass, leaf width and length, leaf area, number and biomass, and shoot/root and leaf/root ratios decreased with salinity, while leaf thickness increased with salinity. More growth was allocated to the roots than to the leaf canopy. Ecophysiological studies in laboratory showed that photosynthesis, stomatal conductance and water potential decreased with salinity, while the CO2 compensation point increased with salinity. Transpiration, dark respiration and photorespiration increased at low salinity but decreased at high salinity levels. In the field study, however, there were no significant differences in stomatal conductance and opening between saline and non-saline soils. Model predictions supported the results of the field measurements. Adaptation to salinity was reflected in an acclimatization of tree structure in the field study. There were both functioning and structural changes of seedlings in the greenhouse experiment

In terms of ecophysiological and morphological characteristics, E. Camaldulensis showed better salt tolerance than C. Quadragulare both in the greenhouse experiment and field study

The PDF includes a summary in Finnish.

  • Luangjame, ORCID ID:E-mail:

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