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Silva Fennica 1926-1997
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Acta Forestalia Fennica
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Articles containing the keyword 'Populus deltoides'.

Category: Research article

article id 450, category Research article
Miaoer Lu, Pekka Nygren, Jari Perttunen, Stephen G. Pallardy, David R. Larsen. (2011). Application of the functional-structural tree model LIGNUM to growth simulation of short-rotation eastern cottonwood. Silva Fennica vol. 45 no. 3 article id 450. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.450
The functional-structural tree growth model LIGNUM was developed as a general research tool that can be applied to several tree species. The growth simulation of short-rotation eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh.) inherits the basic LIGNUM modeling concepts including modular tree structure, L-system-based description of structural development, and carbon budget. New developments of LIGNUM model in this study were the incorporation of a biochemically-derived photosynthesis submodel; nested time steps for simulating physiological processes, structural development, and annual biomass production; incorporation of field-measured weather data for modeling the response of physiological processes to environmental variation; and application of a Monte-Carlo voxel space submodel for simulating the stochasticity of tree growth and improving computational efficiency. A specific parameter system was applied for modeling P. deltoides growth in the central Missouri, USA, environment. This adaptation of LIGNUM was applied on modeling growth of P. deltoides in a short-rotation agroforestry practice. The simulated height and biomass growth were close to field observations. Visualization of simulation results closely resembled the trees growing in an open site. The simulated response of tree growth to variations in photon flux input was reasonable. The LIGNUM model may be used as a complement to field studies on P. deltoides in short-rotation forestry and agroforestry.
  • Lu, Deparment of Forestry, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, USA ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Nygren, The Finnish Society of Forest Science, P.O. 18, FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: pekka.nygren@metla.fi (email)
  • Perttunen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Pallardy, Deparment of Forestry, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, USA ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Larsen, Deparment of Forestry, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, USA ORCID ID:E-mail:

Category: Review article

article id 688, category Review article
John A. Stanturf, Callie J. Schweitzer, Emile S. Gardiner. (1998). Afforestation of marginal agricultural land in the Lower Mississippi River Alluvial Valley, U.S.A. Silva Fennica vol. 32 no. 3 article id 688. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.688
Afforestation of marginal agricultural land in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley (LMAV) relies on native species, planted mostly in single-species plantations. Hard mast species such as oak and pecan are favored for their value to wildlife, especially on public land. Successful afforestation requires an understanding of site variation within floodplains and matching species preferences and tolerances to site characteristics, in particular to inundation regimes. Soil physical conditions, root aeration, nutrient availability, and moisture availability during the growing season also must be considered in matching species to site. Afforestation methods include planting seedlings or cuttings, and direct-seeding. Both methods can be done by hand or by machine. If good quality seedlings are planted properly and well cared for before planting, the chances for successful establishment are high but complete failures do occur. Mortality and poor growth are caused by many factors: extended post-planting drought or flooding; poor planting or seeding practices; poor quality seed or seedlings; animal depredation; or herbicide drift from aerial application to nearby cropland. More species can be planted, even on continuously flooded sites. Direct-seeding, while limited to heavy-seeded species (oaks and hickories), costs less than 50% of planting seedlings. Growth varies considerably by soil type; most bottomland hardwoods grow best on silt loam and less well on clay soils. Up to 200 000 ha of land in the LMAV subject to spring and early summer backwater flooding could be afforested over the next decade.
  • Stanturf, USDA Forest Service, Southern Research Station, P.O. Box 227, Stoneville, MS 38776, USA ORCID ID:E-mail: jstantur/srs_stoneville@fs.fed.us (email)
  • Schweitzer, USDA Forest Service, Southern Research Station, P.O. Box 227, Stoneville, MS 38776, USA ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Gardiner, USDA Forest Service, Southern Research Station, P.O. Box 227, Stoneville, MS 38776, USA ORCID ID:E-mail:

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