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Articles containing the keyword 'biomass estimation'.

Category: Research article

article id 10215, category Research article
Korotimi Ouédraogo, Kangbéni Dimobe, Adjima Thiombiano. (2020). Allometric models for estimating aboveground biomass and carbon stock for Diospyros mespiliformis in West Africa. Silva Fennica vol. 54 no. 1 article id 10215. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.10215
Highlights: Biomass estimation models developed for Diospyros mespiliformis; Models based on DBH alone predicted aboveground biomass with 97.11% accuracy; Published models had relative error between –72% and +98%; Models for branch and stem biomass were more accurate than those for leaf biomass.

Accurate estimates of aboveground biomass (AGB) strongly depend on the suitability and precision of allometric models. Diospyros mespiliformis Hochst. ex A. DC. is a key component of most sub-Sahara agroforestry systems and, one of the most economically important trees in Africa. Despite its importance, very few scientific information exists regarding its biomass and carbon storage potential. In this study direct method was used to develop site-specific biomass models for D. mespiliformis tree components in Burkina Faso. Allometric models were developed for stem, branch and leaf biomass using data from 39 tree harvested in Sudanian savannas of Burkina Faso. Diameter at breast height (DBH), tree height, crown diameter (CD) and basal diameter (D20) were regressed on biomass component using non-linear models with DBH alone, and DBH in combination with height and/or CD as predictor variables. Carbon content was estimated for each tree component using the ash method. Allometric models differed between the experimental sites, except for branch biomass models. Site-specific models developed in this study exhibited good model fit and performance, with explained variance of 81–98%. Using models developed from other areas would have underestimated or overestimated biomass by between –72% and +98%. Carbon content in aboveground components of D. mespiliformis in Tiogo, Boulon and Tapoa-Boopo was 55.40% ± 1.50, 55.52% ± 1.06 and 55.63% ± 1.00, respectively, and did not vary significantly (P-value = 0.909). Site-specific models developed in this study are useful tool for estimating carbon stocks and can be used to accurately estimate tree components biomass in vegetation growing under similar conditions.

  • Ouédraogo, University Joseph Ki-Zerbo, UFR/SVT, Laboratory of Plant Biology and Ecology, 03 B.P. 7021 Ouagadougou 03, Burkina Faso ORCID ID:E-mail: okorotimi@yahoo.fr (email)
  • Dimobe, University Joseph Ki-Zerbo, UFR/SVT, Laboratory of Plant Biology and Ecology, 03 B.P. 7021 Ouagadougou 03, Burkina Faso; University of Dédougou, Institut des Sciences de l’Environnement et du Développement Rural (ISEDR), BP 139 Dédougou, Burkina Faso; West African Science Service Center on Climate Change and Adapted Land Use, Competence Center, Avenue Muamar Ghadhafi, Ouagadougou, BP 9507, Burkina Faso ORCID ID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5536-9700 E-mail: kangbenidimobe@gmail.com
  • Thiombiano, University Joseph Ki-Zerbo, UFR/SVT, Laboratory of Plant Biology and Ecology, 03 B.P. 7021 Ouagadougou 03, Burkina Faso ORCID ID:E-mail: adjima_thiombiano@yahoo.fr
article id 1631, category Research article
Jonas Koala, Louis Sawadogo, Patrice Savadogo, Ermias Aynekulu, Janne Heiskanen, Mohammed Saïd. (2017). Allometric equations for below-ground biomass of four key woody species in West African savanna-woodlands. Silva Fennica vol. 51 no. 3 article id 1631. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1631
Highlights: Species-specific equations for belowground biomass (BGB) predicted biomass with less bias than generic equations; All the generic equations underestimated BGB; For accurate estimation of BGB in savanna-woodlands, species-specific equations are needed for more species.

Accurate estimates of both above-ground biomass (AGB) and below-ground biomass (BGB) are essential for estimating carbon (C) balances at various geographical scales and formulating effective climate change mitigation programs. However, estimating BGB is challenging, particularly for forest ecosystems, so robust allometric equations are needed. To obtain such equations for savanna-woodlands of the West African north sudanian zone, we selected four common native woody species (Anogeissus leiocarpa (DC.) Guill. & Perr., Detarium microcarpum Guill. & Perr., Piliostigma thonningii (Schumach.) Milne-Redh. and Vitellaria paradoxa C.F. Gaertn.). At two sites in Burkina Faso, we determined the BGB of 30 trees of each of these species by excavation, and measured various above-ground dimensional variables. The root:shoot ratio varied widely among the species, from 0.1 to 3.4. Depending on the species, allometric equations based on stem basal area at 20 cm height, basal area at breast height and tree height explained 50–95% of the variation in BGB. The best generic equation we obtained, based on basal area at 20 cm, explained 60% of the variation in BGB across the species. Three previously published generic allometric equations underestimated BGB by 8 to 63%. The presented equations should significantly improve the accuracy of BGB estimates in savanna-woodlands and help avoid costly needs to excavate root systems.

  • Koala, Centre National de Recherche Scientifique et Technologique (CNRST), Institut de l’Environnement et de Recherches Agricoles (INERA), Département Productions Forestières, 03 BP 7047, Ouagadougou 03, Burkina Faso ORCID ID:E-mail: ezeyamb@yahoo.fr (email)
  • Sawadogo, Centre National de Recherche Scientifique et Technologique (CNRST), Institut de l’Environnement et de Recherches Agricoles (INERA), Département Productions Forestières, 03 BP 7047, Ouagadougou 03, Burkina Faso ORCID ID:E-mail: sawadogo_ls@hotmail.com
  • Savadogo, World Agroforestry Centre & International Crop Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRAF-ICRISAT), West and Central Africa Region-Sahel Node, BP 12404, Niamey, Niger ORCID ID:E-mail: savadogo.patrice@gmail.com
  • Aynekulu, World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), United Nations Avenue, P.O. Box 30677-00100, Nairobi, Kenya ORCID ID:E-mail: e.betemariam@cgiar.org
  • Heiskanen, University of Helsinki, Department of Geosciences and Geography, P.O. Box 68, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: janne.heiskanen@helsinki.fi
  • Saïd, International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI). P.O. Box 30709, Nairobi, Kenya ORCID ID:E-mail: m.said@cgiar.org
article id 520, category Research article
Rüdiger Grote. (2002). Foliage and branch biomass estimation of coniferous and deciduous tree species. Silva Fennica vol. 36 no. 4 article id 520. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.520
Under changing environmental conditions, biomass development on the tree and the stand level may differ from today, regardless if the induced change is due to a shift in the general climate properties or to forest management. Under these conditions, tree biomass can not be derived from tables based on former investigations but has to be defined from particular biomass investigations, which generally calculate tree and stand biomass from sample branches using allometric relationships. Therefore, sample measurements on harvested trees are needed. In this paper, foliage and branch biomass estimation for 6 Norway spruces (Picea abies) and 6 beeches (Fagus sylvatica) harvested in a 56-year-old mixed stand in southern Germany is presented. Different allometric models are investigated to derive branch biomass from branch dimension for both species. The equations that are based on branch length, foliated branch fraction, and branch diameter are used for tree and stand level estimates. However, the variation within the 6 trees of each species was too large for a reliable calculation of stand biomass, especially in case of beech branch wood. Furthermore, the necessity of allometric relations and their applicability in individual-tree models is discussed, and the importance of suitable branch- and tree selection is underlined.
  • Grote, TU München, Chair of Forest Yield Science, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising, Germany ORCID ID:E-mail: ruediger.grote@lrz.tu-muenchen.de (email)

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