Current issue: 53(1)

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Silva Fennica 1926-1997
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Acta Forestalia Fennica
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Articles containing the keyword 'compression wood'.

Category: Research article

article id 257, category Research article
Nadir Ayrilmis. (2008). Effect of compression wood on dimensional stability of medium density fiberboard. Silva Fennica vol. 42 no. 2 article id 257. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.257
This study evaluated the effect of compression wood on dimensional stability of medium density fiberboards (MDF) manufactured from fiber furnishes of pine (Pinus nigra Arnold var. pallasiana) containing compression wood. Two panel types were manufactured from two different compression wood (CW) portion / normal wood (NW) portions in the furnish, 75/25 and 10/90, respectively. Linear and thickness variations of the panels exposed to various relative humidites at 20 °C, linear expansion/contraction and thickness swelling/shrinkage, were measured according to the procedures defined by DIN EN 318 (2005) standard test method. Panels made from fiber furnish containing 75% the CW had higher linear expansion and linear contraction values with an average value of 0.286% and 0.247% than those of panels made from fiber furnish containing 10% the CW with an average value of 0.184% and 0.152%, respectively. As for thickness swelling and thickness shrinkage properties, panels made from fiber furnish containing 75% the CW had the thickness swelling and thickness shrinkage values with an average of 5.042% and 4.402% while panels made from fiber furnish containing 10% the CW had the values with 3.621% and 2.861%, respectively. Consequently, based on the findings obtained from this study, expansion and swelling properties of the MDF panels were negatively affected by compression wood increase.
  • Ayrilmis, University of Istanbul, Faculty of Forestry, Department of Wood Mechanics and Technology, Bahcekoy, TR-34473 Istanbul, Turkey ORCID ID:E-mail: nadiray@istanbul.edu.tr (email)
article id 358, category Research article
Turgay Akbulut, Nadir Ayrilmis. (2006). Effect of compression wood on surface roughness and surface absorption of medium density fiberboard. Silva Fennica vol. 40 no. 1 article id 358. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.358
Compression wood is undoubtedly one of the most important raw material variables in wood based panel manufacturing. This study evaluated effect of compression wood on surface roughness and surface absorption (flow distance) of medium density fiberboards (MDF) manufactured from furnishes of pine (Pinus nigra Arnold var. pallasiana) containing compression wood. Panels were manufactured from two different portions of the furnish, one of the portions having a compression wood/normal wood ratio of 75/25, and the other having a ratio of 10/90. Surface absorption and surface roughness were determined according to (EN 382-1) and (ISO 4287), respectively. It was found that panels made from furnish with a 75/25 ratio had a significantly lower surface absorption value (255.78 mm) than panels made from furnish with a 10/90 ratio (317.95 mm). Surface roughness measurements based on three roughness parameters, average roughness (Ra), mean peak-to-valley height (Rz), and maximum peak-to-valley height (Ry) were considered to evaluate the surface characteristics of the panels and supported the above findings as the panels made from furnish with a 75/25 ratio had slightly rougher surface with average values of 4.15 µm (Ra). From the tests performed, we conclude that increasing of the compression wood portion increased the surface roughness and decreased the surface absorption value.
  • Akbulut, Istanbul University, Faculty of Forestry, Bahcekoy, TR-34473 Istanbul, Turkey ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Ayrilmis, Istanbul University, Faculty of Forestry, Bahcekoy, TR-34473 Istanbul, Turkey ORCID ID:E-mail: nadiray@istanbul.edu.tr (email)
article id 388, category Research article
Jacob Edlund, Mats Warensjö. (2005). Repeatability in automatic sorting of curved Norway spruce saw logs. Silva Fennica vol. 39 no. 2 article id 388. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.388
Sawn wood from curved logs is prone to have cross grain and contain compression wood, both of which affect the dimensional stability. Different types of curvature can, however, have different effects on both the sawing process and board quality, which is why a standard measure of bow height alone is not enough to sort logs or set the log quality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the repeatability when sorting curved saw logs using a 3D log scanner. In the study, 56 logs were categorized into five different curvature types and four different degrees of curvature severity. The logs were run through a Rema 3D log scanner four times, and the external geometry was recorded. From the geometry data, variables describing log shapes were calculated and used to develop models using linear discriminant analysis, which was used to classify the logs according to curvature type. The accuracy and repeatability were evaluated for the classifications with Cohen’s simple Kappa coefficient. The results of this study showed that it is possible to sort logs by curve type using a 3D log scanner, although sorting by curve type was largely dependent on curve severity. The repeatability test determined that the chance of a curved log being graded identically two consecutive times was 0.40, measured as kappa.
  • Edlund, SLU, Department of Forest Products and Markets, P.O. Box 7060, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: jacob.edlund@spm.slu.se (email)
  • Warensjö, SLU, Department of Forest Products and Markets, P.O. Box 7060, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:

Category: Article

article id 7118, category Article
Paavo J. Ollinmaa. (1959). Reaktiopuututkimuksia. Acta Forestalia Fennica vol. 72 no. 1 article id 7118. https://doi.org/10.14214/aff.7118
English title: Study on reaction wood.

Compression wood of the tree species studied in this investigation, Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) and common juniper (Juniperus communis L.), was found to be characterized in its cross section by the thick walls and rounded shape of its tracheids and the profuse occurence of spaces. Tension wood of aspen (Populus tremula L.) and alder (Alnus incana (L.) Moench) was found in microscopic examination to be characterized by the gelatinous appearance of the wood fibres, by its small cell cavities and by the thickness and buckling of the inner layer of the cecondary wall. Tracheids of the compression wood were found to have shorter length than normal on an average, while the tension wood fibres were found to be longer.

The microchemical studies suggest a higher than normal lignin content in compression wood and lower than normal lignin content in tension wood, as compared to normal wood. The reverse would be true for the cellulose contents. Volume weight of absolute dry reaction wood was distinctly higher than that of normal wood. The longitudinal shrinkage of reaction wood, particularly of compression wood, is several times that of normal wood. Transversal shrinkage of compression wood is much less than normal wood. Swelling tests revealed pushing effect of compression wood on elongation and pulling effect on tension wood on constraction. Volume shrinkage of compression wood is less than that of normal wood, in contrast to tension wood. The strength of compression wood in absolutely dry condition was nearly same as that of normal wood.

The PDF includes a summary in English.

  • Ollinmaa, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 4965, category Article
Matti Kärkkäinen, Marjut Raivonen. (1977). Reaktiopuun mekaaninen lujuus. Silva Fennica vol. 11 no. 2 article id 4965. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a14816
English title: Mechanical strength of reaction wood.
Original keywords: lyly; reaktiopuu; vetopuu; lujuus

According to the literature, the mechanical strength of the green reaction wood of softwood species (compression wood) is greater than that of normal wood. Drying increases the mechanical strength but less in reaction wood than in normal wood. In particular, the tensile strength along the grain and the impact strength are lower than in normal wood. The compression strength and possibly bending strength are greater, however.

The properties of the reaction wood of hardwood species (tension wood) differ from those of softwoods. When green, all mechanical properties are weaker than those of normal wood. When dried, the tensile strength and impact strength are better and compression strength lower. There is no great difference in the bending strength.

When the higher density of reaction wood is not taken into account and there are no impact forces, the mechanical strength of reaction wood in sawn goods etc. does not differ so much from that of normal wood. The harmful effect of knots, for example, can in practice be much greater.

The PDF includes a summary in English.

  • Kärkkäinen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Raivonen, ORCID ID:E-mail:

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