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Articles containing the keyword 'density'.

Category: Research article

article id 10050, category Research article
Jori Uusitalo, Jari Ala-Ilomäki, Harri Lindeman, Jenny Toivio, Matti Siren. (2019). Modelling soil moisture – soil strength relationship of fine-grained upland forest soils. Silva Fennica vol. 53 no. 1 article id 10050. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.10050
Highlights: Penetration resistance (PR) is best predicted with moisture content (MC), bulk density and clay content; In fully saturated silty or clayey soils PR range from 600 to 800 kPa; The models can be linked with mobility models predicting rutting of forest machines.

The strength of soil is known to be dependent on water content but the relationship is strongly affected by the type of soil. Accurate moisture content – soil strength models will provide forest managers with the improved ability to reduce soil disturbances and increase annual forest machine utilization rates. The aim of this study was to examine soil strength and how it is connected to the physical properties of fine-grained forest soils; and develop models that could be applied in practical forestry to make predictions on rutting induced by forest machines. Field studies were conducted on two separate forests in Southern Finland. The data consisted of parallel measurements of dry soil bulk density (BD), volumetric water content (VWC) and penetration resistance (PR). The model performance was logical, and the results were in harmony with earlier findings. The accuracy of the models created was tested with independent data. The models may be regarded rather trustworthy, since no significant bias was found. Mean absolute error of roughly 20% was found which may be regarded as acceptable taken into account the character of the penetrometer tool. The models can be linked with mobility models predicting either risks of rutting, compaction or rolling resistance.

  • Uusitalo, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Production systems, Korkeakoulunkatu 7, FI-33720 Tampere, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: jori.uusitalo@luke.fi (email)
  • Ala-Ilomäki, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Production systems Maarintie 6, FI-02150 Espoo, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: jari.ala-ilomaki@luke.fi
  • Lindeman, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Production systems, Korkeakoulunkatu 7, FI-33720 Tampere, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: harri.lindeman@luke.fi
  • Toivio, University of Helsinki, Department of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 27, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: toiviojenny@gmail.com
  • Siren, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Production systems Maarintie 6, FI-02150 Espoo, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: matti.siren@luke.fi
article id 10002, category Research article
Bayasaa Tumenjargal, Futoshi Ishiguri, Haruna Aiso-Sanada, Yusuke Takahashi, Bayartsetseg Baasan, Ganbaatar Chultem, Jyunichi Ohshima, Shinso Yokota. (2018). Geographic variations of wood properties of Larix sibirica naturally grown in Mongolia. Silva Fennica vol. 52 no. 4 article id 10002. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.10002
Highlights: Significant differences (p  < 0.01) among five stands were found in tree height, stress-wave velocity of stems, dynamic Young’s modulus of stems and logs, annual ring width, and latewood percentage, suggesting that there was geographic variation of mechanical properties of wood in Larix sibirica (Münchh.) Ledeb. grown in Mongolia; Dynamic Young’s modulus of logs in L. sibirica trees can be predicted by stress-wave velocity of stems; Stem diameter of L. sibirica naturally grown in Mongolia is closely related to radial growth at initial stage of growth, especially within the first twenty years.

Geographic variations in growth, stress-wave velocity of stem, dynamic Young’s modulus of stems and logs, annual ring width, latewood percentage and basic density were investigated for Larix sibirica (Münchh.) Ledeb. naturally grown in Mongolia. A total of 250 trees with 20 to 30 cm in stem diameter at a height of 1.3 m above ground level were selected from each natural stand in five different provenances in Mongolia. In addition, five trees in each stand were cut for measuring dynamic Young’s modulus of stems and logs, annual ring width, latewood percentage and basic density. Mean values of stress-wave velocity of stems in each stand ranged from 2.92 to 3.41 km s–1, and the mean value of five stands was 3.23 km s–1. Mean values of dynamic Young’s modulus of logs in each stand ranged from 5.17 to 9.72 GPa. A significant correlation (r = 0.798, p < 0.01) was found between stress-wave velocity of stems and dynamic Young’s modulus of logs. Among the five stands, the highest and the lowest values of average annual ring number were 193 and 44, respectively. Mean values of basic density in five trees within each stand were examined and ranged from 0.52 to 0.56 g cm–3. Significant differences among five stands were found in tree height, stress-wave velocity of stem, dynamic Young’s modulus of stems and logs, annual ring width and latewood percentage, suggesting that L. sibirica trees naturally grown in Mongolia have geographic variations in mechanical properties of wood.

  • Tumenjargal, Faculty of Agriculture, Utsunomiya University, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8505, Japan; United Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8509, Japan; Research and Training Institute of Forestry and Wood Industry, Mongolian University Science and Technology, Ulaanbaatar 14191, Mongolia ORCID ID:E-mail: t_bayasaa88@yahoo.com
  • Ishiguri, Faculty of Agriculture, Utsunomiya University, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8505, Japan ORCID ID:E-mail: ishiguri@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp (email)
  • Aiso-Sanada, Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8687, Japan ORCID ID:E-mail: haiso@ffpri.affrc.go.jp
  • Takahashi, Faculty of Agriculture, Utsunomiya University, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8505, Japan ORCID ID:E-mail: zo.r.by0814@gmail.com
  • Baasan, Research and Training Institute of Forestry and Wood Industry, Mongolian University Science and Technology, Ulaanbaatar 14191, Mongolia ORCID ID:E-mail: bayartsetseg@must.edu.mn
  • Chultem, Research and Training Institute of Forestry and Wood Industry, Mongolian University Science and Technology, Ulaanbaatar 14191, Mongolia ORCID ID:E-mail: t_bayasaa88@yahoo.com
  • Ohshima, Faculty of Agriculture, Utsunomiya University, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8505, Japan ORCID ID:E-mail: joshima@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp
  • Yokota, Faculty of Agriculture, Utsunomiya University, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8505, Japan ORCID ID:E-mail: yokotas@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp
article id 9948, category Research article
Juha Heiskanen, Ville Hallikainen, Jori Uusitalo, Hannu Ilvesniemi. (2018). Co-variation relations of physical soil properties and site characteristics of Finnish upland forests. Silva Fennica vol. 52 no. 3 article id 9948. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.9948
Highlights: Atmospheric temperature sum is related to site index H100 as a covariate;Soil pH and water retention at field capacity (FC) are also closely related to H100;Fine fraction is related to water retention at FC, soil layer and site type;Fine fraction co-varies also with temperature sum, H100 and slope.

Physical soil properties have a marked influence on the quality of forest sites and on the preconditions for forest growth and management. In this study, water retention characteristics (WRC) and related physical soil properties in addition to vegetation coverage and tree stand data were studied at upland forest sites in Finland. Fixed and mixed models between soil and site characteristics were formed to estimate physical and hydrologic soil characteristics and the site quality with indirect co-varying variables. In the present data, the site quality index (H100) shows a high coefficient of determination in respect to the temperature sum. It is also related to soil fine fraction content, topsoil pH and water retention at field capacity. The thickness of the humus layer is predictable from the pH and cover of xeric and mesic plant species. The soil fine fraction content (clay + silt) is closely related to water retention at field capacity, the soil layer and site type, and without WRC to the temperature sum and site index and type, as well as the slope angle. The soil bulk density is related to organic matter, depth (layer) or alternatively to organic matter, slope and field estimated textural class (fine, medium, coarse). Water retention characteristics were found to be best determinable by the fine fraction content, depth and bulk density. Water content and air-filled porosity at field capacity are closely related to the fine fraction. This study provides novel models for further investigations that aim at improved prediction models for forest growth, hydrology and trafficability.

  • Heiskanen, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Soil ecosystems, Neulaniementie 5, FI-70100 Kuopio, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: juha.heiskanen@luke.fi (email)
  • Hallikainen, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Applied statistical methods, Eteläranta 55, FI-96300 Rovaniemi, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: ville.hallikainen@luke.fi
  • Uusitalo, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Forest technology and logistics, Korkeakoulunkatu 7, FI-33720 Tampere, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: jori.uusitalo@luke.fi
  • Ilvesniemi, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Biorefinery and bioproducts, Tietotie 2, FI-02150 Espoo, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: hannu.ilvesniemi@luke.fi
article id 9938, category Research article
Jyrki Hytönen, Egbert Beuker, Anneli Viherä-Aarnio. (2018). Clonal variation in basic density, moisture content and heating value of wood, bark and branches in hybrid aspen. Silva Fennica vol. 52 no. 2 article id 9938. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.9938
Highlights: Hybrid aspen clones differed in their moisture content, ash content, basic density and heating value; Stem wood had lower ash content, basic density and effective heating value than stem bark; There was significant vertical variation in wood and bark along the stem in moisture content and basic density.

Hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × P. tremuloides) is one of the fastest growing tree species in Finland. During the mid-1990s, a breeding programme was started with the aim of selecting clones that were superior in producing pulpwood. Hybrid aspen can also be grown as a short-rotation crop for bioenergy. To study clonal variation in wood and bark properties, seven clones were selected from a 12-year-old field trial located in southern Finland. From each clone, five trees were harvested and samples were taken from stem wood, stem bark and branches to determine basic density, effective heating value, moisture and ash content. Vertical within-tree variation in moisture content and basic density was also studied. The differences between clones were significant for almost all studied properties. For all studied properties there was a significant difference between wood and bark. Wood had lower ash content (0.5% vs. 3.9%), basic density (378 kg m–3 vs. 450 kg m–3) and effective heating value (18.26 MJ kg–1 vs. 19.24 MJ kg–1), but higher moisture content (55% vs. 49%) than bark. The values for branches were intermediate. These results suggest that the properties of hybrid aspen important for energy use could be improved by clonal selection. However, selecting clones based on fast growth only may be challenging since it may lead to a decrease in hybrid aspen wood density.

  • Hytönen, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Natural resources, Teknologiakatu 7, FI-67100 Kokkola, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: jyrki.hytonen@luke.fi (email)
  • Beuker, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Production systems, Vipusenkuja 6, FI-57200 Savonlinna, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: egbert.beuker@luke.fi
  • Viherä-Aarnio, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Production systems, Latokartanonkaari 9, FI-00790 Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: anneli.vihera-aarnio@luke.fi
article id 7731, category Research article
Anneli Viherä-Aarnio, Pirkko Velling. (2017). Growth, wood density and bark thickness of silver birch originating from the Baltic countries and Finland in two Finnish provenance trials. Silva Fennica vol. 51 no. 4 article id 7731. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.7731
Highlights: Baltic origins of silver birch had significantly thicker bark than the Finnish ones; In terms of wood density, no consistent difference was detected between the Baltic and Finnish origins; Incidence of darkened core wood increased with increasing seed origin latitude; Frost cracks were most common in south Latvian origins grown in central Finland.

Silver birch (Betula pendula Roth) seed origins from the Baltic countries and from Finland were compared in terms of growth, wood density, bark thickness and the incidence of darkened core wood, frost cracks and decay, and the effect of seed origin latitude was examined in two Finnish provenance trials. The material consisted of 21 stand and single tree origins ranging from latitudes 54° to 63°N from the Baltic countries and Finland. The trials, measured at the age of 22 years, were located at Tuusula (60°21´N), southern Finland and at Viitasaari (63°11´N), central Finland. The Baltic origins were superior to the Finnish ones in the southern trial regarding height, whereas in central Finland the Finnish origins grew better. There was no consistent difference between the Baltic and the Finnish group of origins in wood density. Bark thickness decreased with increasing seed origin latitude. The Baltic origins had significantly thicker bark than the Finnish origins. A moderate positive correlation was detected between the seed origin latitude and the incidence of darkened core wood in the southern trial, where the darkened core wood was more common in the Finnish origins than in the Baltic ones. The highest proportion of trees with frost cracks was detected in the south-western Latvian origins growing in central Finland. Seed transfers from the Baltic would have an increasing effect on the bark thickness of birch logs, but no or only minor effects on wood density. Based on our results, there is no reason to recommend the use of non-native Baltic seed origins in Finland instead of the native locally adapted seed sources.

  • Viherä-Aarnio, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Green technology, P.O. Box 2, FI-00791 Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: anneli.vihera-aarnio@luke.fi (email)
  • Velling, ORCID ID:E-mail: pike.velling@phnet.fi
article id 1474, category Research article
Cedric A. Goussanou, Sabin Guendehou, Achille E. Assogbadjo, Maguette Kaire, Brice Sinsin, Aida Cuni-Sanchez. (2016). Specific and generic stem biomass and volume models of tree species in a West African tropical semi-deciduous forest. Silva Fennica vol. 50 no. 2 article id 1474. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1474
Highlights: Non-destructive sampling approach applied to derive ground truth observations and generate robust basic wood densities; Species-specific and generic allometric equations; Specific equations have better predictive capabilities than generic models.

The quantification of the contribution of tropical forests to global carbon stocks and climate change mitigation requires availability of data and tools such as allometric equations. This study made available volume and biomass models for eighteen tree species in a semi-deciduous tropical forest in West Africa. Generic models were also developed for the forest ecosystem, and basic wood density determined for the tree species. Non-destructive sampling approach was carried out on five hundred and one sample trees to analyse stem volume and biomass. From the modelling of volume and biomass as functions of diameter at breast height (Dbh) and stem height, logarithmic models had better predictive capabilities. The model validation showed that in absence of data on height, models using Dbh only as variable was an alternative. The comparison of basic wood densities to data published in literature enabled to conclude that the non-destructive sampling was a good approach to determining reliable basic wood density. The comparative analysis of species-specific models in this study with selected generic models for tropical forests indicated low probability to identify effective generic models with good predictive ability for biomass. Given tree species richness of tropical forests, the study demonstrated the hypothesis that species-specific models are preferred to generic models, and concluded that further research should be oriented towards development of specific models to cover the full range of dominant tree species of African forests.

  • Goussanou, Laboratory of Applied Ecology, Faculty of Agronomic Sciences, University of Abomey-Calavi, 01 BP 526 Cotonou, Benin ORCID ID:E-mail: cedricgoussanou@gmail.com (email)
  • Guendehou, Laboratory of Applied Ecology, Faculty of Agronomic Sciences, University of Abomey-Calavi, 01 BP 526 Cotonou, Benin; Benin Centre for Scientific and Technical Research, 03 BP 1665 Cotonou, Benin ORCID ID:E-mail: sguendehou@yahoo.fr
  • Assogbadjo, Laboratory of Applied Ecology, Faculty of Agronomic Sciences, University of Abomey-Calavi, 01 BP 526 Cotonou, Benin ORCID ID:E-mail: assogbadjo@yahoo.fr
  • Kaire, Centre Régional AGRHYMET, Département Formation et Recherche, BP 11011 Niamey, Niger ORCID ID:E-mail: m.kaire@agrhymet.ne
  • Sinsin, Laboratory of Applied Ecology, Faculty of Agronomic Sciences, University of Abomey-Calavi, 01 BP 526 Cotonou, Benin ORCID ID:E-mail: bsinsin@gmail.com
  • Cuni-Sanchez, University of Copenhagen, Center for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate, Nørregade 10, P.O. Box 2177, 1017 Copenhagen K, Denmark ORCID ID:E-mail: aidacuni@hotmail.com
article id 1141, category Research article
Isabel Miranda, Jorge Gominho, Helena Pereira. (2015). Heartwood, sapwood and bark variation in coppiced Eucalyptus globulus trees in 2nd rotation and comparison with the single-stem 1st rotation. Silva Fennica vol. 49 no. 1 article id 1141. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1141
Highlights: Coppiced E. globulus trees in the 2nd rotation have similar heartwood and sapwood development as single-stem trees in the 1st rotation; The initial tree planting density did not influence heartwood development of coppiced E. globulus trees; Heartwood diameter and height can be modelled with tree diameter and height respectively; Sapwood width is approximately constant within and between coppice and single-stem E. globulus trees.
Coppiced Eucalyptus globulus trees with 18 years in a 2nd rotation were analysed in relation to heartwood, sapwood and bark content taking into account the effect of the initial planting density by using a spacing trial. A total of 25 stumps, with a variable number of stems per stump from 1 to 3, were analysed. Comparison was made to the previous 1st rotation single stem trees, also harvested at 18 years. In the 2nd rotation, the stump density did not significantly affect stem height and diameter, in opposition to the 1st rotation where spacing significantly impacted on tree dimensions. The effect of the initial planting density is somewhat lost in the coppiced stand in relation with i.e. the number of stems per stump. Heartwood was present in all the coppiced trees up to 49.9% of the total tree height and heartwood volume amounted to 38.9–51.7% of the total tree volume. Within the tree, heartwood content decreased from the base upwards, representing, on average, 54.1% at the base and decreasing to 5.1% at 15.3 m. The sapwood width remained relatively constant with an average radial width of approximately 2 cm. The average stem bark content of coppiced trees was 17.4% of the total stem volume. The comparison of heartwood and sapwood development in the coppiced trees did not show significant differences to the 1st rotation trees, nor did the initial spacing. Heartwood diameter could be modelled using the tree diameter both for 1st and 2nd rotation trees.
  • Miranda, Centro de Estudos Florestais, Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Universidade Lisboa, 1349-017 Lisboa, Portugal ORCID ID:E-mail: Imiranda@isa.ulisboa.pt
  • Gominho, Centro de Estudos Florestais, Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Universidade Lisboa, 1349-017 Lisboa, Portugal ORCID ID:E-mail: Jgominho@isa.utl.pt (email)
  • Pereira, Centro de Estudos Florestais, Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Universidade Lisboa, 1349-017 Lisboa, Portugal ORCID ID:E-mail: Hpereira@isa.utl.pt
article id 1002, category Research article
Pentti Niemistö. (2013). Effect of growing density on biomass and stem volume growth of downy birch stands on peatland in Western and Northern Finland. Silva Fennica vol. 47 no. 4 article id 1002. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1002
Highlights: The thinning response in young downy birch stands was low and the mortality of merchantable stems was tolerable even in dense unthinned thickets during the rotation of 50 years; The production of above-ground woody biomass and stem volume or even the production of pulpwood increased with stand density, with these values being greatest for unthinned or very lightly thinned plots.
The objective of the study was to ascertain the relationship of thinning intensity of downy birch (Betula pubescens Ehrh.) stands with height, crown, and diameter development as well as pulpwood, stem volume, and biomass increment using long-term (20−30 years) field experiments. Diameter growth of birches increased with thinning intensity during the first 15 years from thinning in all development phases, though after that it did so only for the youngest stands. The thinning response was low. Thinning intensity had no influence on increase in height. In terms of stem volume with bark, the mortality in unthinned stands during the study period was 30–45 m3 ha-1. The mean stem number in unthinned birch thickets fell from 25 000 ha-1 at a dominant height of 7 m to 3000 ha-1 at 18 m. The stem volume increment over the first 15 years was highest (5–6 m3 ha-1 a-1) on the very lightly thinned or unthinned plots, but later there was no significant difference between initial thinning intensities. The maximum above-ground leafless biomass (over 100 Mg ha-1) was achieved on very lightly thinned plots. Also, the total production (including thinning removal) of biomass or stem volume or even the production of pulpwood increased with stand density, with these values being greatest for very lightly thinned or unthinned plots. During 50-year rotation, the highest leafless above-ground biomass production was 2.5 Mg ha-1 a-1 as a mean value from the experiments. The highest mean annual production of pulpwood (d > 6.5 cm) was 3.2 m3 ha-1 a-1, and, in practice, no saw timber or veneer timber was produced, because of the small size and low quality of the stems. A thinning in downy birch stands increased slightly the size of stems to be removed in future cuttings, but with exception for very light thinning it decreased the production of biomass and merchantable wood.
  • Niemistö, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Parkano Unit, FI-39700 Parkano, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: pentti.niemisto@metla.fi (email)
article id 938, category Research article
Lars Karlsson, Tommy Mörling, Urban Bergsten. (2013). Influence of silvicultural regimes on the volume and proportion of juvenile and mature wood in boreal Scots pine. Silva Fennica vol. 47 no. 4 article id 938. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.938
Highlights: Initial stand densities have a large impact on the proportion of mature wood within trees throughout most of their life cycle; The difference between regimes in volume of long fibres in crop trees could be substantial; Long-term silvicultural strategies implemented at juvenile stand ages can be important tools in order to produce wood raw material suited for specific end-uses.
Trees from 48 to 78 years old, exposed to three different long-term silvicultural regimes, were examined for transition ages between juvenile (JW), transition (TW) and mature wood (MW), total wood volume and proportions of the same wood types, as defined by fibre length. Twenty one sample trees were collected at sites with similar growing conditions within the same geographical area. Stem discs and fibre samples from breast height (BRH), 20% of tree height, green crown height and 70% of tree height were analysed. Trees growing in an environment with few neighboring trees (Sparse regime) started to produce MW, on average, five years later at BRH and six to nine years later at 20% of total tree height than trees in stands with high stem numbers (Dense regime) and trees growing in stands where the stem number had been heavily reduced after an initial high stand density (Dense/Sparse regime). For all regimes, the greatest mean fibre length was found below the green crown and high initial stem numbers were found to positively influence fibre length. The proportion of MW in the whole stem was 34% at Sparse regime sites, 57–69% at Dense/Sparse sites and 63–64% in sites where there was a Dense regime. The proportion of MW was significantly lower for trees from the Sparse regime on each stem section compared. In conclusion, the results suggest that the initial condition a tree faces affects the stem wood properties and quality output at the end of the rotation period.
  • Karlsson, Department of Forest Biomaterials and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: lars.karlsson@slu.se (email)
  • Mörling, Department of Forest Ecology and Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: tommy.morling@slu.se
  • Bergsten, Department of Forest Biomaterials and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: urban.bergsten@slu.se
article id 174, category Research article
Akihiro Sumida, Taro Nakai, Masahito Yamada, Kiyomi Ono, Shigeru Uemura, Toshihiko Hara. (2009). Ground-based estimation of leaf area index and vertical distribution of leaf area density in a Betula ermanii forest. Silva Fennica vol. 43 no. 5 article id 174. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.174
We developed a ground-based method for estimating leaf area index (LAI) and vertical distribution of leaf area density (LAD) for two Betula ermanii plots, combining an allometric method for tree leaf area with the MacArthur–Horn (MH) method using a portable laser rangefinder, including a correction for changes in leaf inclination angle along the vertical gradient measured with a portable digital protractor from a canopy access tower in each plot. Vertical distribution of projected leaf area density obtained by the MH method (LADMH) was transformed to relative distribution for allotting fixed LAI to different heights. Hence, we first developed an allometric method for estimating tree leaf area for LAI determination. Trunk cross-sectional area at branching height (AB) was accurately estimated (r2 = 0.97) from ground-based measurements of tree dimensions. We used this method to apply pipe model allometry between tree leaf area and AB, and estimated LAI (4.56 and 4.57 m2 m–2). We then examined how leaf inclination angle affected estimation of the vertical distribution of actual LAD. Leaf inclination angle measurements revealed that actual LAD in the upper canopy was 1.5–1.8-times higher than LADMH, because of steep leaf inclination, while the correction factor was 1.15–1.25 in the lower canopy. Due to the difference among heights, vertical distribution of LAD estimated with correction for vertical change in leaf inclination was more skewed to the upper canopy than that without correction. We also showed that error in LAD distribution can result if horizontal canopy heterogeneity is neglected when applying the MH method.
  • Sumida, Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, N19W8, Sapporo 060-0819, Japan ORCID ID:E-mail: asumida@lowtem.hokudai.ac.jp (email)
  • Nakai, International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 930 Koyukuk Drive, P.O. Box 757340, Fairbanks, Alaska 99775-7340, USA ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Yamada, International Meteorological & Oceanographic Consultants Co., Ltd. Kawaguchi-cho 2-6528-87, Choshi, Chiba 288-0001, Japan ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Ono, Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, N19W8, Sapporo 060-0819, Japan ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Uemura, Field Science Center for Northern Biosphere, Hokkaido University, Tokuda 250, Nayoro, Hokkaido 096-0071, Japan ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Hara, Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, N19W8, Sapporo 060-0819, Japan ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 202, category Research article
Tuula Nuutinen, Antti Kilpeläinen, Hannu Hirvelä, Kari Härkönen, Veli-Pekka Ikonen, Reetta Lempinen, Heli Peltola, Lars Wilhelmsson, Seppo Kellomäki. (2009). Future wood and fibre sources – case North Karelia in eastern Finland. Silva Fennica vol. 43 no. 3 article id 202. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.202
Information on the potential wood supply is important for the wood industry. In this study, the future development of growing stock, cutting potential and wood properties corresponding to the regional scenario of North Karelian Forest Programme 2006–2010 was analysed. The simulations were performed by employing the Finnish MELA system together with the sample plot and tree data of the 9th Finnish National Forest Inventory (NFI9) as initial data for the simulations. Disc-based models for basic wood density, proportion of latewood and fibre length of Norway spruce and Scots pine in Sweden were calibrated and integrated into the MELA system. The wood properties at breast height of both harvested and standing trees were analysed in different strata (age, site type and cutting method) during the scenario period of 50 years (2002–2052). The average wood properties within the same strata varied only slightly over time. However, the results for different strata differed considerably. In general, wood density, fibre length and proportion of latewood increased, on average, as a function of tree age and along with a decrease in site fertility (excl. wood density and proportion of latewood in harvested Norway spruce in the first case and fibre length in the latter case for both species). For trees less than 80 years, properties in harvested trees were equal to or slightly greater than those of standing trees. The values for clear-cuttings were greater or equal to those of thinnings (excl. wood density and proportion of latewood in Norway spruce). The study demonstrates the value of model-based analyses utilising NFI tree measurements in regions that are considered to be sources of raw material.
  • Nuutinen, European Forest Institute, Torikatu 34, FI-80100 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: tuula.nuutinen@efi.int (email)
  • Kilpeläinen, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Hirvelä, Finnish Forest Research Institute, P.O. Box 18, FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Härkönen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, P.O. Box 18, FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Ikonen, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Lempinen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, P.O. Box 68, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Peltola, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Wilhelmsson, Skogforsk, Uppsala Science Park, SE-751 83 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kellomäki, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 194, category Research article
Ane Zubizarreta Gerendiain, Heli Peltola, Pertti Pulkkinen. (2009). Growth and wood property traits in narrow crowned Norway spruce (Picea abies f. pendula) clones grown in southern Finland. Silva Fennica vol. 43 no. 3 article id 194. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.194
We investigated the growth, yield, wood density traits and fibre properties in 13 narrow crowned Norway spruce (Picea abies f. pendula) clones grown at a spacing of 2 m x 1.5 m (about 3300 seedlings/ha) in a field trial established in 1988 in southern Finland on a forest soil. For comparison, we used 3 normal crowned Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) genetic entries grown as a mixture in the same trial representing southern Finnish breeding regions. We found that wood density traits and fibre properties showed, on average, lower phenotypic variation than growth and yield traits regardless of crown type. Narrow crowned clones also had, on average, lower stem volume and fibre length, but higher overall wood density. More over, the phenotypic correlations between studied growth and wood properties ranged, on average, from moderate (normal crown) to high (narrow crown). These results were opposite to previous findings for narrow and normal crowned genetic entries grown in narrower spacing (1 m x 1 m) in southern Finland. Thus, this indicates lower plasticity of narrow crowned clones to the increasing growing space compared to normal crowned ones, so, they should be grown at denser spacing in order to fully utilise its space efficiency capacity. However, this field trial was established as a mixture of normal and narrow crown trees, so that 90% of genetic entries were narrow crowned ones, and therefore the crown competition would be much higher for normal crowned trees when the whole trial would consist of that entry alone. In the latter case, we could expect significantly lower productivity of normal crowned genetic entries with this spacing.
  • Zubizarreta Gerendiain, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: ane.zubizarreta@joensuu.fi (email)
  • Peltola, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Pulkkinen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Haapastensyrjä Breeding Station, FI-12600 Läyliäinen, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 193, category Research article
Jaume Gort, Ane Zubizarreta Gerendiain, Heli Peltola, Pertti Pulkkinen, Johanna Routa, Raimo Jaatinen. (2009). Differences in fibre properties in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) genetic entries grown at different spacing and sites. Silva Fennica vol. 43 no. 3 article id 193. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.193
In forest breeding, stem volume growth and sawn timber quality indicators have been used as the most important selection traits for Scots pine, whereas less attention has been given to characteristics such as fibre properties. In the above context, we investigated the differences in fibre properties (i.e. fibre length, fibre width and coarseness) in 20 year old Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) genetic entries as affected by spacing and site, but also the phenotypic correlations between fibre properties, yield and wood density. The study was based on materials harvested from 10 genetic entries grown in a spacing trial (site 1) in central Finland, with a current stand density of 2000 (spacing 1), 2000–2500 (spacing 2) and 4000 trees/ha (spacing 3). In order to study the effects of site, we harvested additional material (4 of 7 genetic entries same as on site 1) from a trial located in southern Finland with a corresponding stand density of 2000 trees/ha (site 2). On site 1, spacing 1 and 3, all average values for analysed fibre properties were similar. In spacing 2 average values were slightly higher. On site 2, the average values for different fibre properties were similar compared to the corresponding spacing 1 on site 1. Spacing affected (p < 0.05) all average fibre properties on site 1; as did also site, when comparing same genetic entries grown on both sites. Regardless of spacing and site, the phenotypic correlations between average fibre length, fibre width and coarseness showed, on average, moderate to strong correlation (p < 0.05). Fibre width showed, in general, low and positive phenotypic correlation with diameter at breast height, stem volume and wood density on site 1. However, as a whole, the ranking of genetic entries changed depending on the trait and spacing considered. Thus, no overall ranking between genetic entries was possible.
  • Gort, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forest Sciences, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: jaume.gort@joensuu.fi (email)
  • Zubizarreta Gerendiain, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forest Sciences, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Peltola, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forest Sciences, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Pulkkinen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Haapastensyrjä Breeding Station, Karkkilantie ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Routa, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forest Sciences, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Jaatinen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Haapastensyrjä Breeding Station, Karkkilantie ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 221, category Research article
Glen Murphy, Rod Brownlie, Mark Kimberley, Peter Beets. (2009). Impacts of forest harvesting related soil disturbance on end-of-rotation wood quality and quantity in a New Zealand radiata pine forest. Silva Fennica vol. 43 no. 1 article id 221. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.221
The long-term effect of soil disturbance (litter removal, topsoil removal and compaction) from forest harvesting on wood quality and quantity of second-rotation Pinus radiata growing on a clay loam soil, was assessed at the end the rotation, 26 years after planting. Relative to Control plots, average tree and stand total volume at rotation end was not significantly affected by litter removal and nil or light compaction, but was significantly reduced by 28% by litter and topsoil removal and moderate subsoil compaction, and further reduced by 38% by heavy compaction. Wood density at breast height in the inner rings of trees in the most disturbed treatments was elevated by up to 30 kg m–3. This occurred because these treatments were more N deficient as reflected by foliar N levels during the first 11 years of growth relative to the Control. However, no treatment differences in wood density were evident in outer rings, and by rotation age overall mean density did not differ significantly between treatments. Neither acoustic velocity of standing trees, nor acoustic velocity of logs, was significantly affected by soil disturbance, indicating that stiffness of lumber cut from trees in the trial was likely to be similar for all treatments. Economic impacts of soil disturbance and compaction on this soil type will therefore result largely from the considerable negative impacts on final tree size, with little or no compensation from improved wood properties.
  • Murphy, Forest Engineering, Resources and Management Department, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon, USA ORCID ID:E-mail: glen.murphy@oregonstate.edu (email)
  • Brownlie, Scion Research, Rotorua, New Zealand ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kimberley, Scion Research, Rotorua, New Zealand ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Beets, Scion Research, Rotorua, New Zealand ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 248, category Research article
Tuula Jyske, Harri Mäkinen, Pekka Saranpää. (2008). Wood density within Norway spruce stems. Silva Fennica vol. 42 no. 3 article id 248. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.248
We studied the variation in average wood density of annual rings, earlywood density, and latewood density in addition to ring width and latewood percentage within Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) stems from the pith to the bark, and from the stem base towards the stem apex. Moreover, the variation in wood density within annual rings was studied at the different heights and radial positions in the stem. The material consisted of 85 trees from central and south-eastern Finland. Variation between the annual rings accounted for 11–27% of the total variation in wood density. Only small differences (3–6%) in wood density were found between different heights in the stem. The largest (49–80%) variation in wood density was found within the annual rings. The difference in wood density between earlywood and latewood was smaller in the rings near the pith than in the outer rings. The increasing wood density from the pith outwards was related to increasing latewood density and latewood percentage, whereas the earlywood density increased only slightly from the pith outwards. In a given cambial age (i.e., given rings from the pith), the average wood density of annual rings increased with increasing stem height. In contrast, in the rings formed in the same calendar years (i.e., given rings from the bark), the average wood density of annual rings decreased with increasing stem height. The results of this study verify our knowledge of wood density variation and can further contribute to creating models to predict wood density.
  • Jyske, The Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa Research Unit, P.O. Box 18, FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: tuula.jyske@metla.fi (email)
  • Mäkinen, The Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa Research Unit, P.O. Box 18, FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Saranpää, The Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa Research Unit, P.O. Box 18, FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 247, category Research article
Ane Zubizarreta Gerendiain, Heli Peltola, Pertti Pulkkinen, Veli-Pekka Ikonen, Raimo Jaatinen. (2008). Differences in growth and wood properties between narrow and normal crowned types of Norway spruce grown at narrow spacing in Southern Finland. Silva Fennica vol. 42 no. 3 article id 247. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.247
In recent years there has been increased interest in the so called narrow crowned Norway spruce (Picea abies f. pendula), which is a rare mutant of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karsten), as a suitable wood raw material source for pulp and paper production. This is because it is less sensitive to competition than the normal crowned Norway spruce, and thus, could be more productive especially at dense spacing. In the above context, we investigated how the growth and yield (such as height, diameter, stem volume and ring width) in addition to wood density traits and fibre properties (such as wood density, fibre length and width, cell wall thickness and fibre coarseness) were affected in trees from 9 full-sib families representing narrow crowned Norway spruce grown at narrow spacing of 1 m 1 m in Southern Finland. For comparison, we used normal crowned Norway spruce trees from 6 breeding regions. We found that, compared to growth and yield traits, wood density traits and fibre properties showed, on average, lower phenotypic variations. In addition, these variations were smaller for narrow crowned families than for normal crowned genetic entries. Narrow crowned families also showed, on average, higher growth and yield and fibre length, but lower wood density. Moreover, the phenotypic correlations between growth, yield, wood density traits and fibre properties, ranged, on average, from moderate (narrow crowned) to high (normal crowned). As a whole, the growth and wood properties of narrow crowned families were found to be less sensitive to tree competition than the normal crowned genetic entries used as a comparison.
  • Zubizarreta Gerendiain, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forest Sciences, Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: ane.zubizarreta@joensuu.fi (email)
  • Peltola, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forest Sciences, Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Pulkkinen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Haapastensyrjä Breeding Station, Läyliäinen, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Ikonen, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forest Sciences, Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Jaatinen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Haapastensyrjä Breeding Station, Läyliäinen, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 257, category Research article
Nadir Ayrilmis. (2008). Effect of compression wood on dimensional stability of medium density fiberboard. Silva Fennica vol. 42 no. 2 article id 257. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.257
This study evaluated the effect of compression wood on dimensional stability of medium density fiberboards (MDF) manufactured from fiber furnishes of pine (Pinus nigra Arnold var. pallasiana) containing compression wood. Two panel types were manufactured from two different compression wood (CW) portion / normal wood (NW) portions in the furnish, 75/25 and 10/90, respectively. Linear and thickness variations of the panels exposed to various relative humidites at 20 °C, linear expansion/contraction and thickness swelling/shrinkage, were measured according to the procedures defined by DIN EN 318 (2005) standard test method. Panels made from fiber furnish containing 75% the CW had higher linear expansion and linear contraction values with an average value of 0.286% and 0.247% than those of panels made from fiber furnish containing 10% the CW with an average value of 0.184% and 0.152%, respectively. As for thickness swelling and thickness shrinkage properties, panels made from fiber furnish containing 75% the CW had the thickness swelling and thickness shrinkage values with an average of 5.042% and 4.402% while panels made from fiber furnish containing 10% the CW had the values with 3.621% and 2.861%, respectively. Consequently, based on the findings obtained from this study, expansion and swelling properties of the MDF panels were negatively affected by compression wood increase.
  • Ayrilmis, University of Istanbul, Faculty of Forestry, Department of Wood Mechanics and Technology, Bahcekoy, TR-34473 Istanbul, Turkey ORCID ID:E-mail: nadiray@istanbul.edu.tr (email)
article id 273, category Research article
Stefan Mattson, Urban Bergsten, Tommy Mörling. (2007). Pinus contorta growth in boreal Sweden as affected by combined lupin treatment and soil scarification. Silva Fennica vol. 41 no. 4 article id 273. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.273
Effects of combining lupin (Lupinus nootkatensis L.) establishment and soil scarification on stem volume and stem biomass yield of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. var. latifolia Engelm.) were studied on a poor boreal site in Sweden 18 years after plantation. A field randomized block experiment was established with three different scarification techniques (disc trenching, moulding and ploughing) followed by establishment of lupins by either seeds or roots. There were three blocks without and two blocks with lupins. Overall, on average for the three soil scarification techniques, the lupin treatment significantly increased the volume per hectare by 102%.The lupin treatment significantly increased the stem volume per hectare by 236% for mounding and 139% for disc trenching, whereas the 55% increase for ploughing was not significant. The increase in the total stem biomass yield per tree was more pronounced for larger trees; 46% for average trees and 106% for dominant trees. However, there were no significant differences between scarification techniques for the lupin treatment in total stem biomass yield. Over the 18-year period, the increased growth rate following the lupin treatment resulted in a significantly decreased average stem basic wood density (on average 6%) for the sample trees. Because lupin is a nitrogen-fixing plant species, the large increase in tree growth following the lupin treatment was probably an effect of increased amount of nitrogen in the soil. The results indicate that use of lupin is a possible alternative to increase site productivity of lodgepole pine on poor boreal sites.
  • Mattson, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Dept of Forest Ecology and Management, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Bergsten, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Dept of Forest Ecology and Management, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Mörling, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Dept of Forest Ecology and Management, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: tommy.morling@ssko.slu.se (email)
article id 285, category Research article
Heli Peltola, Antti Kilpeläinen, Kari Sauvala, Tommi Räisänen, Veli-Pekka Ikonen. (2007). Effects of early thinning regime and tree status on the radial growth and wood density of Scots pine. Silva Fennica vol. 41 no. 3 article id 285. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.285
In this work, we studied the effects of early thinning on the radial growth and wood density over a 12-year post-thinning period in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) trees grown on a site with a rather poor nutrient supply. Ring width, early and late wood width and early wood percentage, mean intra-ring wood density and early- and late wood density were analyzed in 98 sample trees using X-ray microdensitometry. For the analyses, ten different thinning plots with post-thinning stand density varying from 575 to 3400 stems ha–1 were grouped into four classes representing heavy thinning, moderate thinning, light thinning and no thinning. We found that the radial growth in the thinned treatments increased significantly compared to that of the unthinned treatment. Despite this, the mean intra-ring wood density did not decrease significantly as a result of heavy thinning, although it was 2% less, on average (with a range of 1–4% in large and small trees), compared to that of the unthinned treatment. In the lightly thinned treatment, the mean intra-ring wood density even increased by 5%, on average (with a range 4–7% in small and large trees), but in the moderately thinned treatment, the level of change was not as clear. The thinning response of trees representing different status in a stand differed significantly and was also affected by the post-thinning stand density. Altogether, observed simultaneous increases in early and late wood widths and late wood density, but a decrease in early wood density indicate that as a result of heavy thinning, especially, un-uniformity of wood density will increase. On the other hand, although heavy thinning increased tree growth by 9–20%, on average, compared to moderate thinning, which corresponds quite well with business-as-usual management, mean wood density decreased only 0–4% depending on tree status in a stand (from large to small trees). Thus, the decrease observed in wood density was less than expected as a result of heavy thinning at an early stage of stand development, which has recently been recommended as one possible management option in Scots pine in Finland.
  • Peltola, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: heli.peltola@joensuu.fi (email)
  • Kilpeläinen, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Sauvala, Finnish Forest Research Institute, P.O. Box 18, FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Räisänen, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Ikonen, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 308, category Research article
Ville Hallikainen, Mikko Hyppönen, Juha Hyvönen, Juhani Niemelä. (2007). Establishment and height development of harvested and naturally regenerated Scots pine near the timberline in North-East Finnish Lapland. Silva Fennica vol. 41 no. 1 article id 308. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.308
Researchers and professionals in practical forestry have faced problems concerning the regeneration success of Scots pine in natural regeneration near the timberline in North-East Lapland. The aim of the study was to analyze the seedling establishment and seedling height development of Scots pine in seed-tree stands in the area. The average number of living pine seedlings in the study stands was about 1000 ha–1, but there was considerable variation between the stands. The seedling density was modelled using a multinomial logistic regression with a random factor. Forest site type and the time since seed-tree cutting were the most significant explanatory variables in the model. The probability of reaching the acceptable seedling density was higher on dry site types than on the more fertile ones. The probability increased with the time elapsed since the regeneration activities. Effective temperature sum and the number of intermediate pines also positively affected the probability, but the presence of residual trees negatively. On northern and eastern slopes the probability was lower than on southern and western ones. Seedling height was modelled using a linear mixed model. The age of a dominant seedling was the most positively effective explanatory variable in the height development model. Other positively affecting significant predictors were time since seed-tree cutting, number of intermediate birches, and distance between a seedling and the nearest seed tree. Degree of paludification had a negative effect. The study suggests that the regeneration of Scots pine in North-East Lapland is a relatively slow process.
  • Hallikainen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Rovaniemi Research Unit, P.O. Box 16, FI-96301 Rovaniemi, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: ville.hallikainen@metla.fi (email)
  • Hyppönen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Rovaniemi Research Unit, P.O. Box 16, FI-96301 Rovaniemi, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: mikko.hypponen@metla.fi
  • Hyvönen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Rovaniemi Research Unit, P.O. Box 16, FI-96301 Rovaniemi, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: juha.hyvonen@metla.fi
  • Niemelä, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Rovaniemi Research Unit, P.O. Box 16, FI-96301 Rovaniemi, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 322, category Research article
Jaakko Repola. (2006). Models for vertical wood density of Scots pine, Norway spruce and birch stems, and their application to determine average wood density. Silva Fennica vol. 40 no. 4 article id 322. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.322
The purpose of this study was to investigate the vertical dependence of the basic density of Scots pine, Norway spruce, and birch stems, and how such dependence could be applied for determining the average stem wood density. The study material consisted of 38 Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), 39 Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst.) and 15 birch (Betula pendula and Betula pubescens) stands located on mineral soil sites in southern Finland. The stem material mainly represented thinning removal from stands at different stages of development. The linear mixed model technique, with both fixed and random effects, was used to estimate the model. According to the fixed part of the model, wood density was dependent on the vertical location along the stem in all three tree species. Wood density in pine decreased from the butt to the top, and the gradient in wood density was steep at the butt but decreased in the upper part of the stem. The vertical dependence was similar in birch, but the density gradient was much smaller. For spruce the vertical dependence of the basic density was moderate. The model can be calibrated for a tree stem when one or more sample disks are measured at freely selected heights. Using treewise calibrated predictions of the vertical density dependence and measured stem diameters, almost unbiased estimates, and lower prediction errors than with traditional methods, were obtained for the average stem wood density. The advantages of the method were greater for pine with a strong vertical dependence in basic density, than for spruce and birch.
  • Repola, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Rovaniemi Research Unit, Eteläranta 55, FI-96300 Rovaniemi, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: jaakko.repola@metla.fi (email)
article id 341, category Research article
Sanni Raiskila, Pekka Saranpää, Kurt Fagerstedt, Tapio Laakso, Mia Löija, Riitta Mahlberg, Leena Paajanen, Anne-Christine Ritschkoff. (2006). Growth rate and wood properties of Norway spruce cutting clones on different sites. Silva Fennica vol. 40 no. 2 article id 341. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.341
The effect of growth rate on weight density and strength properties of three Norway spruce cutting clones growing on three different sites in different geographic locations was studied. The purpose was to follow variation in wood physical and mechanical properties and in quality between fast-growing clones grown in environments differing in nutritional and soil properties and climate within the boreal zone. The cloned trees had been selected on grounds of good growth, health and quality. The cuttings were collected from three-year-old seedlings and rooted. The rooted cuttings were planted in the 1970’s and they were on average 26 years old at a time of felling. The variation of weight density was studied within the annual ring and within the stem between the juvenile and mature wood from the pith to the bark with an X-ray densitometric method. The average annual ring width (and latewood proportion, %) varied between the clones from 2.92±1.36 mm (15.34%) to 3.30±1.25 mm (11.80%) and between the sites from 2.76±1.07 mm (14.71%) to 3.70±1.22 mm (13.29%). The mean weight density was 0.461±0.077 g cm–3 and latewood density 0.750±0.125 g cm–3 in this material. The mean modulus of elasticity was 9.88±1.43 GPa, modulus of rupture 67.51±11.50 MPa and weight density of the test samples (ρ12) 414±44 kg m–3 in mature wood. The parameters studied showed clearly that the environment had a large effect while the three clones differed from each other similarly in the different sites, e.g. the fastest growing clone was fastest on all sites.
  • Raiskila, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa Research Unit, P.O. Box 18, FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Saranpää, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa Research Unit, P.O. Box 18, FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: pekka.saranpaa@metla.fi (email)
  • Fagerstedt, Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, Plant Biology, P.O. Box 65, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Laakso, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa Research Unit, P.O. Box 18, FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Löija, VTT Building and Transport, P.O. Box 1806, FI-02044 VTT, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Mahlberg, VTT Building and Transport, P.O. Box 1806, FI-02044 VTT, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Paajanen, VTT Building and Transport, P.O. Box 1806, FI-02044 VTT, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Ritschkoff, VTT Building and Transport, P.O. Box 1806, FI-02044 VTT, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 358, category Research article
Turgay Akbulut, Nadir Ayrilmis. (2006). Effect of compression wood on surface roughness and surface absorption of medium density fiberboard. Silva Fennica vol. 40 no. 1 article id 358. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.358
Compression wood is undoubtedly one of the most important raw material variables in wood based panel manufacturing. This study evaluated effect of compression wood on surface roughness and surface absorption (flow distance) of medium density fiberboards (MDF) manufactured from furnishes of pine (Pinus nigra Arnold var. pallasiana) containing compression wood. Panels were manufactured from two different portions of the furnish, one of the portions having a compression wood/normal wood ratio of 75/25, and the other having a ratio of 10/90. Surface absorption and surface roughness were determined according to (EN 382-1) and (ISO 4287), respectively. It was found that panels made from furnish with a 75/25 ratio had a significantly lower surface absorption value (255.78 mm) than panels made from furnish with a 10/90 ratio (317.95 mm). Surface roughness measurements based on three roughness parameters, average roughness (Ra), mean peak-to-valley height (Rz), and maximum peak-to-valley height (Ry) were considered to evaluate the surface characteristics of the panels and supported the above findings as the panels made from furnish with a 75/25 ratio had slightly rougher surface with average values of 4.15 µm (Ra). From the tests performed, we conclude that increasing of the compression wood portion increased the surface roughness and decreased the surface absorption value.
  • Akbulut, Istanbul University, Faculty of Forestry, Bahcekoy, TR-34473 Istanbul, Turkey ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Ayrilmis, Istanbul University, Faculty of Forestry, Bahcekoy, TR-34473 Istanbul, Turkey ORCID ID:E-mail: nadiray@istanbul.edu.tr (email)
article id 366, category Research article
Lars Eliasson. (2005). Effects of forwarder tyre pressure on rut formation and soil compaction. Silva Fennica vol. 39 no. 4 article id 366. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.366
In Swedish forestry, final felling is usually done by a harvester and a forwarder. These machines are heavy and the risk for rutting and soil compaction can be considerable under unfavourable soil conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of forwarder tyre inflation pressure on rutting and soil compaction after final felling. Three levels of forwarder tyre pressure were studied, 300, 450 and 600 kPa, after 2 and 5 machine passages. The first passage was driven with a 19.7 Mg harvester, and the second to fifth passages with a fully loaded forwarder totalling 37.8 Mg. Rut depths were not significant affected by tyre pressures but increased significantly with the number of machine passages. Soil density was significantly increased by 0.075 Mg m–3 by the harvester passage. Soil density increased significantly with increasing number of forwarder passages, and tyre pressure did not significantly influence this increase but the interaction between number of forwarder passages and tyre pressure was almost significant. Data suggest that density increases occur earlier in the 600 kPa treatment than in the other treatments. Only parts of an area harvested are trafficked in a normal harvesting operation. Outside the research area approximately 12.5 per cent of the area harvested was covered with ruts. On primary strip roads, which are heavily trafficked, soil compaction cannot be avoided by reducing the tyre pressure. On secondary strip roads, not passed more than once by the forwarder, a low forwarder tyre pressure may reduce soil compaction.
  • Eliasson, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Silviculture, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: lars.eliasson@norraskogsagarna.se (email)
article id 360, category Research article
Timo Kurkela, Tarmo Aalto, Martti Varama, Risto Jalkanen. (2005). Defoliation by the common pine sawfly (Diprion pini) and subsequent growth reduction in Scots pine: a retrospective approach. Silva Fennica vol. 39 no. 4 article id 360. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.360
The foliage status in the main stem of Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris) was studied retrospectively using the needle trace method (NTM) on a stand, seriously defoliated by the pine sawfly (Diprion pini) in the 1980s. Needle density increased abruptly in the seasons following the defoliation. The strongest reduction in annual needle production occurred one year later. As a consequence of lower needle production, the annual number of attached needles decreased three to five years after the defoliation. Needle retention and the average age of attached needles tended to increase after defoliation. In analyses of covariance with the NTM variables, needle density (logarithmic transformed values) and average age of attached needles, had the highest, significant, negative relationship with radial and height increments both in the period prior to the defoliation and in the time when the trees were suffering from defoliation. The relationships between height increment and the number of needles and needle loss were positive and significant. Also radial increment had a positive relationship with the number of needles but not with needle loss. Interestingly, an abrupt increase in the needle density gave a good indication of the effects of a sudden defoliation in pines.
  • Kurkela, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa Research Unit, P.O. Box 18, FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: timo.kurkela@metla.fi (email)
  • Aalto, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Rovaniemi Research Unit, P.O. Box 16, FI-96301 Rovaniemi, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Varama, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa Research Unit, P.O. Box 18, FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Jalkanen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Rovaniemi Research Unit, P.O. Box 16, FI-96301 Rovaniemi, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 385, category Research article
Diego Pérez, Markku Kanninen. (2005). Effect of thinning on stem form and wood characteristics of teak (Tectona grandis) in a humid tropical site in Costa Rica. Silva Fennica vol. 39 no. 2 article id 385. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.385
The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of thinning intensity on wood properties, such as heartwood proportion, wood basic density, and stem form of teak (Tectona grandis L.f.). The thinning trial was established on a teak plantation in a humid tropical site in northern Costa Rica. The moderate and heavy thinnings yielded the highest percentage of heartwood volume (25 to 30% of total stem volume). The differences between stem form factors under different treatments were not statistically significant after separating thinning effects from timing effects. Both the highest (> 0.65 g cm–3) and the lowest (< 0.50 g cm–3) wood density values were observed under light thinnings, making it difficult to establish a relationship. Large variations in wood properties found under different thinning regimes suggest that at early stages teak stands can be managed under different thinning programs without negatively affecting the quality of wood under humid tropical conditions.
  • Pérez, Ambiente Tierra S.A., Apartado 733-2250, Tres Ríos, Cartago, Costa Rica ORCID ID:E-mail: diegoperez@costarricense.cr (email)
  • Kanninen, Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), Bogor, Indonesia ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 404, category Research article
William L. Mason, Colin Edwards, Sophie E. Hale. (2004). Survival and early seedling growth of conifers with different shade tolerance in a Sitka spruce spacing trial and relationship to understorey light climate. Silva Fennica vol. 38 no. 4 article id 404. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.404
Alternative silvicultural systems to clearfelling are being adopted in Great Britain as a means of increasing the species and structural diversity of conifer plantation forests. One area where knowledge is lacking is the critical level of below-canopy light for survival and growth of young seedlings. This was investigated by planting seedlings of European larch Larix decidua (Mill.), Scots pine Pinus sylvestris L., Sitka spruce Picea sitchensis (Bong.(Carr.)), Douglas fir Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.(Franco.)), and western hemlock Tsuga heterophylla (Raf. (Sarg.)) in a Sitka spruce plantation thinned to 3 different spacings. The incident light intensity beneath the canopy ranged from about 2 to over 60 per cent of full light. Planting in an adjoining open area provided an indication of growth under full light. Growth and survival of these seedlings were followed for 4 growing seasons. The highest seedling survival was found under the widest spacing and declined with closer spacing and lower light intensity. Only Douglas fir and western hemlock seedlings survived at the closest spacing, and in low percentages. The tallest seedlings of each species were found in the open grown conditions but survival was variable due to increased weed competition. Species-specific growth responses showed little difference under high light conditions but performance at low light was generally consistent with shade tolerance rankings in the literature except that Sitka spruce shade tolerance was slightly lower than expected. Minimum light requirements for these species increased from 10 to 30 per cent of full light with decreasing shade tolerance. Other studies of incident light in Sitka spruce plantations indicated that target basal areas in the range 25–30 m2 ha–1 are required if these light conditions are to be met, which suggests an irregular shelterwood system with frequent interventions should be favoured.
  • Mason, Forest Research, Northern Research Station, Roslin, Midlothian, Scotland, UK, EH25 9SY ORCID ID:E-mail: bill.mason@forestry.gsi.gov.uk (email)
  • Edwards, Forest Research, Northern Research Station, Roslin, Midlothian, Scotland, UK, EH25 9SY ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Hale, Forest Research, Northern Research Station, Roslin, Midlothian, Scotland, UK, EH25 9SY ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 433, category Research article
Raija Laiho, Timo Penttilä, Jukka Laine. (2004). Variation in soil nutrient concentrations and bulk density within peatland forest sites. Silva Fennica vol. 38 no. 1 article id 433. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.433
The within-site variability of soil characteristics on sites with different soil types remains poorly quantified, although this information is crucial for the success of research on soil properties, and especially for monitoring soil properties over time. We used coefficients of variation and multilevel variance component models to examine the within-site variation of soil (0–30 cm) mineral nutrient concentrations (P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, mg g–1; Mn, Zn, mg g–1) and bulk density (kg m–3) on boreal deep-peat sites. We then evaluated the reliability of the site-level estimates (sample means) obtained using different sampling intensities (numbers of samples per site). Our 11 sites represented a single original site type within the oligotrophic nutrient level. Two of the sites were undrained while the rest had been drained for forestry at different points in time. Overall, P concentrations showed the smallest and Mn concentrations the largest within-site variation. The sampling depth contributed more than 50% of the total variance in all other characteristics except the concentrations of P and Fe, and bulk density. The variance proportions of peatland basin, site (within basin), and sampling location (within site) varied by sampling depth for most soil characteristics. The estimates obtained when using a certain number of samples per site were always more reliable for the 0–30 cm layer’s composite samples than for any single 10-cm layer at any depth sampled. On average, it was found that between 4 (P) and some 200 (Mn) samples per site would be needed for the estimates to have a theoretical 10% maximum deviation.
  • Laiho, Univ. of Helsinki, Dept. of Forest Ecology, Peatland Ecology Group, P.O. Box 27, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: raija.laiho@helsinki.fi (email)
  • Penttilä, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa Research Centre, P.O. Box 18, FIN-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Laine, Univ. of Helsinki, Dept. of Forest Ecology, Peatland Ecology Group, P.O. Box 27, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 511, category Research article
Luis Diego Pérez Cordero, Markku Kanninen. (2003). Heartwood, sapwood and bark content, and wood dry density of young and mature teak (Tectona grandis) trees grown in Costa Rica. Silva Fennica vol. 37 no. 1 article id 511. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.511
The aim of this study was to evaluate the heartwood, sapwood and bark content, and wood dry density in young and mature teak (Tectona grandis) trees. For this, 17 plantations were selected from 11 sites representing different climatic conditions and plantation densities (156 to 1600 trees ha–1, and line planting). From these plantations, a total of 87 trees with ages between 5 and 47 years were felled for stem analysis. The highest heartwood proportion of stem volume (over bark) was 61% and the lowest 0.4%. The sapwood proportion ranged between 24 and 72%, while bark represented from 14 to 37% of the total volume. Heartwood proportion was significantly different (P < 0.05) among climatic zones: ‘wet’ sites producing less heartwood than ‘dry’ sites. Stem diameter (under bark) and heartwood diameter at different stem heights differed among sample trees, even when plotted in relative values to avoid dependency with stem size. Dry density was statistically different between 8-year-old trees or younger and 47-year-old trees, and between line planting trees and 13-year-old trees or younger, but did not differ statistically between line planting trees and mature trees. No significant differences were found between climatic zones or between different stand densities. Dry density values for T. grandis plantations in Costa Rica are similar to those reported elsewhere.
  • Pérez Cordero, Centro Agronómico Tropical de Investigación y Enseñanza (CATIE), Turrialba, Costa Rica ORCID ID:E-mail: diegoperez@costarricense.cr (email)
  • Kanninen, Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), Bogor, Indonesia ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 622, category Research article
Håkan Lindström. (2000). Intra-tree models of basic density in Norway spruce as an input to simulation software. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 4 article id 622. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.622
Basic density is said to influence aspects of conversion, properties, and end-use of forest products. Consequently, it is argued that accurate models of basic density variation, within and between trees, could be used to improve the utilisation of wood as an industrial raw material. The objective of the present study was to develop basic density models based on Norway spruce trees, that could be used within a model system for conversion simulation studies. Nineteen stands of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) were selected throughout Sweden. Based on dbh, two small, two moderate, and two large timber trees were taken from each stand. Dbh varied between 180–470 mm, tree height between 17–34 m, and total age between 51–152 years. Each selected tree was cross-cut into logs; discs were prepared from the butt end of each log and from the top end of the top log. Computed tomography scanning and image analysis were used to determine basic density and growth ring development on sampled discs. Basic density development in 20-mm segments from pith outwards was modelled in models based on ring width, tree and growth condition data. The resulting models had an adjusted R2 of 0.37–0.51 and a RMSE of 37–41 kg/m3.
  • Lindström, University of Canterbury, School of Forestry, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand ORCID ID:E-mail: lindstromhakan@netscape.net (email)
article id 622, category Research article
Håkan Lindström. (2000). Intra-tree models of basic density in Norway spruce as an input to simulation software. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 4 article id 622. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.622
Basic density is said to influence aspects of conversion, properties, and end-use of forest products. Consequently, it is argued that accurate models of basic density variation, within and between trees, could be used to improve the utilisation of wood as an industrial raw material. The objective of the present study was to develop basic density models based on Norway spruce trees, that could be used within a model system for conversion simulation studies. Nineteen stands of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) were selected throughout Sweden. Based on dbh, two small, two moderate, and two large timber trees were taken from each stand. Dbh varied between 180–470 mm, tree height between 17–34 m, and total age between 51–152 years. Each selected tree was cross-cut into logs; discs were prepared from the butt end of each log and from the top end of the top log. Computed tomography scanning and image analysis were used to determine basic density and growth ring development on sampled discs. Basic density development in 20-mm segments from pith outwards was modelled in models based on ring width, tree and growth condition data. The resulting models had an adjusted R2 of 0.37–0.51 and a RMSE of 37–41 kg/m3.
  • Lindström, University of Canterbury, School of Forestry, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand ORCID ID:E-mail: lindstromhakan@netscape.net (email)
article id 649, category Research article
Tord Johansson. (1999). Biomass production of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) growing on abandoned farmland. Silva Fennica vol. 33 no. 4 article id 649. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.649
Biomass production of forests has been studied for at least a century. Tree biomass is used in Sweden both as industrial raw material and an energy source. Few studies dealing with biomass yield from Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) growing on farmland are published. Practical recommendations are sparsely. The aim of this study was to construct dry weight equations for Norway spruce growing on farmland. Dry weight equations for fractions of Norway spruce trees were made. Biomass production was estimated in 32 stands of Norway spruce growing on abandoned farmland. The stands were located in Sweden at latitudes ranging from 58° to 64° N, and their total age varied from 17 to 54 years. A modified ‘mean tree technique’ was used to estimate biomass production; i.e. the tallest tree was chosen for sampling. The actual mean total dry weight above stump level for the 32 stands was 116 ton ha–1, with a range of 6.0 to 237.4 ton d.w. ha–1. When previous thinning removals were included, the mean biomass value was 127 ton ha–1 (6.0–262.8). In addition to estimating conventional dry weights of trees and tree components, basic density, specific leaf area, total surface area and leaf area index, among other measures, were estimated. Norway spruce biomass yields on plots subjected to different thinning were compared. The total harvested biomass was 75–120 ton d.w. ha–1 in heavy thinnings from below. Stands were thinned four to five times, with the first thinning at 23–27 years and the last at 51–64 years. The harvested biomass obtained in the first thinning was 18–38 ton d.w. ha–1. Total biomass production was 178–305 ton d.w. ha–1. Stands thinned from above supplied 71–130 ton d.w. ha–1 in total and 17–42 ton d.w. ha–1 in the first thinning. The total biomass supply was 221–304 ton d.w. ha–1. Unthinned stands produced a total of 155–245 ton d.w. ha–1.
  • Johansson, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Forest Management and Products, P.O. Box 7060, S-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: tord.johansson@sh.slu.se (email)
article id 663, category Research article
Lennart Moberg. (1999). Variation in knot size of Pinus sylvestris in two initial spacing trials. Silva Fennica vol. 33 no. 2 article id 663. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.663
The objective of this study was to investigate the variation in internal knot size of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stems sampled from mature permanent plots, and for which the silvicultural history was known. It was based on a sample of mature trees removed from two different spacing trials representing a moderate and high site index. Knot size was measured with non-destructive methods using a CT-scanner and digital image analysis. Initial spacing varied between 0.75 and 3 m on the high site-index trial and between 1.5 and 2.5 m on the moderate site-index trial. Wider initial spacing on the high site index resulted in larger knots near the base of the stem. However, due to successive thinnings which gradually equalised stand density among plots, the difference between most plots was less further up in the stems. The effect of silvicultural regime was much more limited on the lower site index. Within-stand differentiation resulted in a variation of tree diameter (DBH); larger trees had significantly larger knots. Furthermore, knots were larger towards south than towards north in both trials. These results illustrated that, by using non-destructive measurements on trees sampled from permanent research plots, it was possible to simultaneously study the variation of internal knot size at stand (such as site and silviculture effects), within-stand (such as relative tree size) and within-tree levels (such as height and azimuth). However, lack of replication prevented valid statistical inference as to stand-level effects.
  • Moberg, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Forest Management and Products, P.O. Box 7060, S-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: lennart.moberg@sh.slu.se (email)

Category: Research note

article id 7798, category Research note
Jānis Liepiņš, Jānis Ivanovs, Andis Lazdiņš, Jurģis Jansons, Kaspars Liepiņš. (2017). Mapping of basic density within European aspen stems in Latvia. Silva Fennica vol. 51 no. 5 article id 7798. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.7798
Highlights: Stem bark is significantly denser than wood and does not follow the same variation patterns along the stem; The main trend in radial variation of wood density was the increase from pith to bark; There is a weak relationship between mean basic density and commonly measured stand and tree parameters.

The objective of this study was to investigate basic density and its within-stem variation by studying 84 European aspen stems from 28 forest stands in Latvia. The studied forest stands covered all age classes from young stands to matured forests in representative growth conditions of European aspen. The densities of 2722 wood and 1022 bark specimens were measured from the sampled trees. Only the knot-free wood specimens without obvious wood defects were chosen for analyses. A map of basic density summarizing its radial and axial variations was constructed to show species-specific, within-stem variability and the relationships between density and tree and stand variables were examined. Stem wood and bark of the European aspen show different patterns of basic density variation along the tree stem. Wood density increases from pith to bark up to certain dimensions and shows a slight decrease afterwards. The weighted basic density of bark (446 ± 39.6 kg m–3) was higher than stem wood density (393 ± 30.4 kg m–3). Our results suggest that wood and bark density measurements obtained at breast height can be used for reliable estimation of the densities of whole-tree stem components, while tree parameters such as diameter at breast height (DBH), tree height and social status or stand parameters, including number of trees, basal area and age, are weak predictors in this context.

  • Liepiņš, Latvian State Forest Research Institute “Silava”, 111 Rigas Str., LV 2169, Salaspils, Latvia ORCID ID:E-mail: janis.liepins@silava.lv (email)
  • Ivanovs, Latvian State Forest Research Institute “Silava”, 111 Rigas Str., LV 2169, Salaspils, Latvia ORCID ID:E-mail: janis.ivanovs@silava.lv
  • Lazdiņš, Latvian State Forest Research Institute “Silava”, 111 Rigas Str., LV 2169, Salaspils, Latvia ORCID ID:E-mail: andis.lazdins@silava.lv
  • Jansons, Latvian State Forest Research Institute “Silava”, 111 Rigas Str., LV 2169, Salaspils, Latvia ORCID ID:E-mail: jurgis.jansons@silava.lv
  • Liepiņš, Latvian State Forest Research Institute “Silava”, 111 Rigas Str., LV 2169, Salaspils, Latvia ORCID ID:E-mail: kaspars.liepins@silava.lv
article id 7798, category Research note
Jānis Liepiņš, Jānis Ivanovs, Andis Lazdiņš, Jurģis Jansons, Kaspars Liepiņš. (2017). Mapping of basic density within European aspen stems in Latvia. Silva Fennica vol. 51 no. 5 article id 7798. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.7798
Highlights: Stem bark is significantly denser than wood and does not follow the same variation patterns along the stem; The main trend in radial variation of wood density was the increase from pith to bark; There is a weak relationship between mean basic density and commonly measured stand and tree parameters.

The objective of this study was to investigate basic density and its within-stem variation by studying 84 European aspen stems from 28 forest stands in Latvia. The studied forest stands covered all age classes from young stands to matured forests in representative growth conditions of European aspen. The densities of 2722 wood and 1022 bark specimens were measured from the sampled trees. Only the knot-free wood specimens without obvious wood defects were chosen for analyses. A map of basic density summarizing its radial and axial variations was constructed to show species-specific, within-stem variability and the relationships between density and tree and stand variables were examined. Stem wood and bark of the European aspen show different patterns of basic density variation along the tree stem. Wood density increases from pith to bark up to certain dimensions and shows a slight decrease afterwards. The weighted basic density of bark (446 ± 39.6 kg m–3) was higher than stem wood density (393 ± 30.4 kg m–3). Our results suggest that wood and bark density measurements obtained at breast height can be used for reliable estimation of the densities of whole-tree stem components, while tree parameters such as diameter at breast height (DBH), tree height and social status or stand parameters, including number of trees, basal area and age, are weak predictors in this context.

  • Liepiņš, Latvian State Forest Research Institute “Silava”, 111 Rigas Str., LV 2169, Salaspils, Latvia ORCID ID:E-mail: janis.liepins@silava.lv (email)
  • Ivanovs, Latvian State Forest Research Institute “Silava”, 111 Rigas Str., LV 2169, Salaspils, Latvia ORCID ID:E-mail: janis.ivanovs@silava.lv
  • Lazdiņš, Latvian State Forest Research Institute “Silava”, 111 Rigas Str., LV 2169, Salaspils, Latvia ORCID ID:E-mail: andis.lazdins@silava.lv
  • Jansons, Latvian State Forest Research Institute “Silava”, 111 Rigas Str., LV 2169, Salaspils, Latvia ORCID ID:E-mail: jurgis.jansons@silava.lv
  • Liepiņš, Latvian State Forest Research Institute “Silava”, 111 Rigas Str., LV 2169, Salaspils, Latvia ORCID ID:E-mail: kaspars.liepins@silava.lv
article id 7798, category Research note
Jānis Liepiņš, Jānis Ivanovs, Andis Lazdiņš, Jurģis Jansons, Kaspars Liepiņš. (2017). Mapping of basic density within European aspen stems in Latvia. Silva Fennica vol. 51 no. 5 article id 7798. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.7798
Highlights: Stem bark is significantly denser than wood and does not follow the same variation patterns along the stem; The main trend in radial variation of wood density was the increase from pith to bark; There is a weak relationship between mean basic density and commonly measured stand and tree parameters.

The objective of this study was to investigate basic density and its within-stem variation by studying 84 European aspen stems from 28 forest stands in Latvia. The studied forest stands covered all age classes from young stands to matured forests in representative growth conditions of European aspen. The densities of 2722 wood and 1022 bark specimens were measured from the sampled trees. Only the knot-free wood specimens without obvious wood defects were chosen for analyses. A map of basic density summarizing its radial and axial variations was constructed to show species-specific, within-stem variability and the relationships between density and tree and stand variables were examined. Stem wood and bark of the European aspen show different patterns of basic density variation along the tree stem. Wood density increases from pith to bark up to certain dimensions and shows a slight decrease afterwards. The weighted basic density of bark (446 ± 39.6 kg m–3) was higher than stem wood density (393 ± 30.4 kg m–3). Our results suggest that wood and bark density measurements obtained at breast height can be used for reliable estimation of the densities of whole-tree stem components, while tree parameters such as diameter at breast height (DBH), tree height and social status or stand parameters, including number of trees, basal area and age, are weak predictors in this context.

  • Liepiņš, Latvian State Forest Research Institute “Silava”, 111 Rigas Str., LV 2169, Salaspils, Latvia ORCID ID:E-mail: janis.liepins@silava.lv (email)
  • Ivanovs, Latvian State Forest Research Institute “Silava”, 111 Rigas Str., LV 2169, Salaspils, Latvia ORCID ID:E-mail: janis.ivanovs@silava.lv
  • Lazdiņš, Latvian State Forest Research Institute “Silava”, 111 Rigas Str., LV 2169, Salaspils, Latvia ORCID ID:E-mail: andis.lazdins@silava.lv
  • Jansons, Latvian State Forest Research Institute “Silava”, 111 Rigas Str., LV 2169, Salaspils, Latvia ORCID ID:E-mail: jurgis.jansons@silava.lv
  • Liepiņš, Latvian State Forest Research Institute “Silava”, 111 Rigas Str., LV 2169, Salaspils, Latvia ORCID ID:E-mail: kaspars.liepins@silava.lv
article id 1346, category Research note
Āris Jansons, Roberts Matisons, Oskars Krišāns, Baiba Džeriņa, Mārtiņš Zeps. (2016). Effect of initial fertilization on 34-year increment and wood properties of Norway spruce in Latvia. Silva Fennica vol. 50 no. 1 article id 1346. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1346
Highlights: The initial fertilization increased the productivity of Picea abies increasing stem volume by 17% at the age of 34 years; The tree-ring width was affected for up to15 years; The fertilization did not affect mean tree-ring density, although the latewood density was increased.

Initial fertilisation, when the fertilizer is supplied during the plantation, is applied to improve the competitive ability of the seedlings and hence to increase their growth and productivity; however, fertilization could also alter wood properties and timber quality. In this study, the dimensions and tree-ring parameters – width, proportion of latewood, maximum and mean density, mean earlywood and latewood density – of initially fertilized (by 14, 6 and 11 g of N, P and K per seedling, respectively) Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst.) growing in an experimental plantation in Kalsnava, Latvia (temperate climate region) were assessed. The fertilization significantly increased the dimensions of trees in long-term (ca. 17% increase of stemwood volume). The analysis of tree-ring width suggested that the duration of the effect was ca. 15 years. The maximum and latewood density were higher for the fertilized trees only in a few years. The mean and earlywood density of tree-rings were mainly similar for both treatments. Altogether, considering the one-time application of a limited amount of fertilizer, such treatment had notable and lasting effect on Norway spruce.

  • Jansons, LSRFI “Silava”, Rigas str. 111, Salaspils, Latvia, LV2169 ORCID ID:E-mail: aris.jansons@silava.lv
  • Matisons, LSRFI “Silava”, Rigas str. 111, Salaspils, Latvia, LV2169 ORCID ID:E-mail: robism@inbox.lv (email)
  • Krišāns, LSRFI “Silava”, Rigas str. 111, Salaspils, Latvia, LV2169 ORCID ID:E-mail: oskars.krisans@silava.lv
  • Džeriņa, LSRFI “Silava”, Rigas str. 111, Salaspils, Latvia, LV2169 ORCID ID:E-mail: baiba.dzerina@silava.lv
  • Zeps, LSRFI “Silava”, Rigas str. 111, Salaspils, Latvia, LV2169 ORCID ID:E-mail: martins.zeps@silava.lv
article id 678, category Research note
Ian A. Nalder, Ross W. Wein. (1998). A new forest floor corer for rapid sampling, minimal disturbance and adequate precision. Silva Fennica vol. 32 no. 4 article id 678. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.678
We describe an effective and inexpensive device for sampling forest floors. It is based on a rechargeable, battery-powered drill that drives a sharpened steel coring tube. The corer is simple to fabricate, is lightweight (3.5 kg) and can be used easily by one person to obtain intact, natural volume cores of the forest floor. It has been used extensively to obtain samples in 114 boreal forest stands of western Canada. We found that coefficients of variation were typically 30% for forest floor organic matter and bulk density, and tended to be higher in Pinus banksiana stands than in Picea glauca and Populus tremuloides. Ten samples per stand gave adequate precision for a study of forest floor dynamics and autocorrelation did not appear to be a problem with five-metre sampling intervals. In addition to sampling forest floors, the corer has proven suitable for sampling moss and lichen layers and mineral soil down to about 20 cm. A similar powered system can also be used for increment boring of trees.
  • Nalder, University of Alberta, Department of Renewable Resources, 442 Earth Sciences Building, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2E3 ORCID ID:E-mail: inalder@gpu.srv.ualberta.ca (email)
  • Wein, University of Alberta, Department of Renewable Resources, 442 Earth Sciences Building, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2E3 ORCID ID:E-mail:

Category: Discussion article

article id 119, category Discussion article
Markku Larjavaara, Helene C. Muller-Landau. (2011). Cross-section mass: an improved basis for woody debris necromass inventory. Silva Fennica vol. 45 no. 2 article id 119. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.119
  • Larjavaara, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Unit 9100 Box 0948, DPO AA 34002-9998, USA, and University of Helsinki, Department of Forest Sciences, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: larjavaaram@si.edu (email)
  • Muller-Landau, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Unit 9100 Box 0948, DPO AA 34002-9998, USA ORCID ID:E-mail:

Category: Article

article id 7164, category Article
Veijo Heiskanen. (1965). Puiden paksuuden ja nuoruuden kehityksen sekä oksaisuuden ja sahapuulaadun välisistä suhteista männiköissä. Acta Forestalia Fennica vol. 80 no. 2 article id 7164. https://doi.org/10.14214/aff.7164
English title: Relation between the development of the early age and thickness of trees and their branchiness in Scots pine stands in Finland.

The objective of the study was to establish the influence of the founding density of a stand and the intensity of intermediate cutting on the quality of pine saw logs stems, primarily on their branchiness. Measurements were carried out in 68 Myrtillus-type and 32 Vaccinium-type Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stands. The quality of 1,982 sample trees was assessed.

According to the results, the branchless part of the stem is longest in the older age classes of trees. In all age classes the percentage of the branchless part is highest in medium sized stems. The relative height of the crown limit is greatest in small diameter classes and continues as the thickness of the tree increases. The crown is longer in the thicker tree. The grade of the butt log is on average highest in medium sized stems. Knottiness of a log made it unsuitable for a saw log only among the thickest stems. The relative share of the u/s grade decreased as the thickness of the trees increased.

From the point of view of early development of the trees it was concluded that in all age classes the branchless part is the shorter the faster the tree has grown in diameter when it was young. Also, branches of the butt log are the bigger the faster the tree has developed when it was young. The grade of the butt log improves as the thickness of the annual rings diminishes.

To produce good quality sawn timber, the pine stands should be established dense, and the first thinnings should be delayed as much as possible. The best time for the thinning would be when the diameter of the dominant trees at stump height is 12–15 cm and when all the branches have died on the length of the butt log. After the first thinning, comparatively intense intermediate thinning may be applied.

The PDF includes a summary in English.

  • Heiskanen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 7164, category Article
Veijo Heiskanen. (1965). Puiden paksuuden ja nuoruuden kehityksen sekä oksaisuuden ja sahapuulaadun välisistä suhteista männiköissä. Acta Forestalia Fennica vol. 80 no. 2 article id 7164. https://doi.org/10.14214/aff.7164
English title: Relation between the development of the early age and thickness of trees and their branchiness in Scots pine stands in Finland.

The objective of the study was to establish the influence of the founding density of a stand and the intensity of intermediate cutting on the quality of pine saw logs stems, primarily on their branchiness. Measurements were carried out in 68 Myrtillus-type and 32 Vaccinium-type Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stands. The quality of 1,982 sample trees was assessed.

According to the results, the branchless part of the stem is longest in the older age classes of trees. In all age classes the percentage of the branchless part is highest in medium sized stems. The relative height of the crown limit is greatest in small diameter classes and continues as the thickness of the tree increases. The crown is longer in the thicker tree. The grade of the butt log is on average highest in medium sized stems. Knottiness of a log made it unsuitable for a saw log only among the thickest stems. The relative share of the u/s grade decreased as the thickness of the trees increased.

From the point of view of early development of the trees it was concluded that in all age classes the branchless part is the shorter the faster the tree has grown in diameter when it was young. Also, branches of the butt log are the bigger the faster the tree has developed when it was young. The grade of the butt log improves as the thickness of the annual rings diminishes.

To produce good quality sawn timber, the pine stands should be established dense, and the first thinnings should be delayed as much as possible. The best time for the thinning would be when the diameter of the dominant trees at stump height is 12–15 cm and when all the branches have died on the length of the butt log. After the first thinning, comparatively intense intermediate thinning may be applied.

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  • Heiskanen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 7116, category Article
Kustaa Kallio. (1960). Metsikön taksatorinen tiheys keskipituuteen ja tiheyteen perustuvassa kuutiomäärän arvioinnissa. Acta Forestalia Fennica vol. 71 no. 7 article id 7116. https://doi.org/10.14214/aff.7116
English title: The mensurational density of a stand in estimating the volume on the basis of the mean height and the density class.

In Finland ocular estimation of the growing stock has been made by means of volume tables based on the mean height and density class, or on the dominant height and density class of the stand. The author has observed that if the volume of a stand is estimated by employment of both tables, the results vary markedly from one another. Furthermore, volume of fully stocked stands in the dominant height tables show an approximate correspondence with the volumes of managed normal stands in Southern Finland.

The purpose of this study is therefore to develop volume tables for coniferous trees, based on the density class and the mean height; these tables should give the same volume for a stand as the dominant height tables.

Volume per hectare of 187 Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stands and 120 Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) stands on different forest types were estimated using the relascope method in Southern Finland. With the volume and the measured mean and dominant heights as a basis, the density classes were extracted from both mean height tables and the dominant height tables. The investigation indicates that the author estimated the dense stands too thinly, and the thin ones too densely, and that the erroneous estimation of the density can be corrected by comparison of the ocular estimations and the corresponding measurements. The density can be measured by means of crown closure, stem number per hectare or the basal area per hectare.

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  • Kallio, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 7458, category Article
Sulo Väänänen. (1955). Ammattimaisten metsätyömiesten asunto-olot. Acta Forestalia Fennica vol. 63 no. 5 article id 7458. https://doi.org/10.14214/aff.7458
English title: Housing conditions of professional forest workers in Finland.

The data on housing conditions presented in this study derives from the general population census of Finland of 1950. The sub-sample of professional forest workers was taken from the sample collected for the larger investigation of rural labour force. The housing density of professional forest workers was considerably higher than the average for the population in general. The total population of the country, according to the 1950 Census, showed a ratio of 154 persons to 100 rooms, while the average weighted with the number of rooms for forest workers was 237:100, and the unweighted 340:100. If three per room is taken as the limit of crowded housing, nearly half of the professional forest workers lived in crowded conditions. Over two-thirds of them owned their dwellings, and only 2% of them lived in dwellings owned by the employer. Three quarters of all the men belonged to the holder-family of small farms. About three quarters of them lived in dwellings of one or two rooms. Also, the size of the family and household affected the housing density. The housing density exceeds the average in the youngest age classes. This is probably because the sons of families with poor economic standing must start work young in forestry, and those families have a high housing density. A quarter of the families had electricity in their dwellings. Few had running water or sewage in their houses.

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  • Väänänen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 7259, category Article
I. Lassila. (1929). Metsätyypin vaikutuksesta puun painoon. Acta Forestalia Fennica vol. 36 no. 1 article id 7259. https://doi.org/10.14214/aff.7259
English title: The influence of forest site type on the weight of wood.

Earlier research has presented contradictory results of the influence of forest site type on the weight of wood. In this study, dominant trees of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) was chosen as sample trees on four forest site types: Calluna, Vaccinium, Myrtillus and Oxalis site types. The trees were felled in autumn, when the water content of the wood is low. Weight of the test samples was measured weigh before and after drying. Undried wood, both sapwood and heartwood, is heavier in Myrtillus type than in Vaccinium type. The weight of the air-dried heartwood did not differ between the two forest site types. Air-dried- sapwood was heaviest in Myrtillus site type. Air-dried heartwood was heaviest in Vaccinium site type, and lightest in Oxalis type. Owen-dried sapwood was heaviest in Calluna site type, where the tree growth is slow, but weight differences were small in owen-dried heartwood. It can be claimed that forest type affects wood quality.

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  • Lassila, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5608, category Article
Harri Mäkinen. (1997). Possibilities of competition indices to describe competitive differences between Scots pine families. Silva Fennica vol. 31 no. 1 article id 5608. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a8509

Possibilities of distance-independent and -dependent competition indices to describe the competition stress of an individual tree was studied in Southern Finland. Five half-sib open-pollinated families and one check lot of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) was used as study material in order to analyse competitive interactions of crown form and stand density variation. Almost all competition indices correlated strongly with radial increment. Thus distance-independent indices were adequate to describe competition in young row plantations, where distance effects between trees were implicitly eliminated. Correlations between indices and height increment were not significant. Along with the increase in competition, the width and length of the crown and the diameter increment of the stem of some narrow-crowned families decreased slowly compared to wide-crowned families.

  • Mäkinen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5560, category Article
Carl Johan Westman. (1995). A simple device for sampling of volumetric forest soil cores. Silva Fennica vol. 29 no. 3 article id 5560. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a9211

A simple, manually-operated and easily portable device for sampling volumetric soil cores to a depth of 100 cm with a minimum soil disturbance is described. The device consists of a sample tube, a sampler and an extension tube. A dead blow nylon mallet is used to force the sampler into the soil and a small winch attached to an aluminium tube pulls the sampler from the soil. The total weight of the equipment (sampler, mallet and winch) is 18.5 kg and may be carried in the trunk of a small car. Sampling is easily done by one person in good physical condition but four-handed operation is recommended as more efficient. The sampling device has been in heavy use during the summers of 1993–95 when several hundred soil cores have been extracted on various sites all over Finland.

  • Westman, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5528, category Article
Pekka Tamminen, Michael Starr. (1994). Bulk density of forested mineral soils. Silva Fennica vol. 28 no. 1 article id 5528. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a9162

Relationships between bulk density and organic matter (OM) content, textural properties and depth are described for forested mineral soils from Central and Northern Finland. Core samples were taken of 0–5, 30–35 and 60–65 cm layers at 75 plots. Three measures of bulk density were calculated: the bulk density of the < 20 mm fraction (BD20), the bulk density of the < 2 mm fraction (BD2), and laboratory bulk density (BDl). BDl was determined from the mass of a fixed volume of < 2 mm soil taken in the laboratory. All three measures of bulk densities were strongly correlated with organic matter content (r ≥ -0.63). Depth and gravel (2–20 mm) content (in the case of BD2) were also important variables. BDl was sensitive to clay contents > 7% but did significantly improve the prediction of both BD2 and BD20 in coarse soils (clay contents ≤ 7%). Predictive models were derived for coarse soils.

  • Tamminen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Starr, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5503, category Article
Juha Heiskanen. (1993). Variation in water retention characteristics of peat growth media used in tree nurseries. Silva Fennica vol. 27 no. 2 article id 5503. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15664

The water retention characteristics and their variation in tree nurseries and related physical properties were determined for commercially produced growth media made of light slightly humified Sphagnum peat. A total of 100 samples of peat media were collected from filled seedling trays in the greenhouses of four Finnish nurseries in 1990. In addition, the physical properties were determined for two growth media made of compressed peat sheets and chips. The variation in water retention characteristics in nurseries was described using linear models with fixed and random effects. The sources of variation in the mixed linear models were producer, grade, batch (greenhouse) and sample (tray).

The water retention of the peat media at different matric potentials was comparable to that given in the literature. The media shrank an average of 0–16% during desorption. The peat grades were finer than the Nordic quality standards for peat growth media. Particles < 1 mm increased and particles 1–5 mm decreased the water retention characteristics measured. The greatest total variation in water retention was at -1 kPa. The water retention of the peat media differed least at -5 and -10 kPa. The water retention characteristics of media from different producers usually differed significantly. The grades, on the other hand, did not differ from each other in their water retention characteristics nor were there significant interactions between producer and grade. The batch effect was marked but was lower than the effect within batches, where the sample (tray) effect was greater than the effect due to random measurement error. At -10 kPa, the measurement error was, however, clearly greater than the sample effect. The random measurement error was comparable to the batch effect. Aeration of the growth media is dependent on the water content retained between saturation and -1 kPa. The water availability to seedlings at the nursery phase is affected mainly by water retention between -1 and -10 kPa.
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  • Heiskanen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5490, category Article
Timo Pukkala, Jari Karsikko, Taneli Kolström. (1992). A spatial model for the diameter of thickest branch of Scots pine. Silva Fennica vol. 26 no. 4 article id 5490. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15651

The model predicts the base diameter of the thickest living branch of a tree growing in a planted or naturally regenerated even-aged stand. A mixed model type was used in which the residual variation was divided into within-stand and between-stand components. The study material consisted of 779 trees measured in 12 plots located in 20 to 35 years old Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stands (breast height age 10 to 20 years). Branch diameter was closely connected to the breast height diameter of the stem. In a stand of a certain age, competition by close neighbours slightly decreased branch diameter in a given diameter class. According to the model, the greatest difference is between trees subjected to very little competition and those subjected to normal competition. The model was used in simulated stands with varying age, density, and tree arrangement. The simulations showed that trees with rapid diameter growth at young age had thicker branches at a given breast height diameter than trees with slower diameter growth. However, a very slow growth rate did not produce trees with branches thinner than those possessing a medium growth rate.
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  • Pukkala, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Karsikko, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kolström, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5302, category Article
Seppo Kellomäki, Heikki Hänninen, Taneli Kolström, Ahti Kotisaari, Timo Pukkala. (1987). A tentative model for describing the effects of some regenerative process on the properties of natural seedling stands. Silva Fennica vol. 21 no. 1 article id 5302. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15459

The effect of the size of seed crop, dispersal of seeds and the early development of seedlings on the density and spatial distribution of young Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stands are evaluated on the basis of theoretical models. The models include (i) number and spatial distribution of parent trees on the regeneration area, (ii) size of annual seed crop, (iii) seed dispersal from a particular parent tree, (iv) germination of the seeds (germination percentage), (v) death of ageing seedlings after the establishment process, and (vi) height growth of the seedlings.

As expected, stand density and spatial distribution varied within a large range in relation to the density of the parent trees and the distance from them. The simulations also showed that natural seedling stands can be expected to be heterogenous due to the geometry of seed dispersal, emphasizing the frequency of young and small trees. The properties of the seedling stands were, however, greatly dependent on the density of the parent trees and the length of the regeneration period.

The PDF includes an abstract in Finnish.

  • Kellomäki, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Hänninen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kolström, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kotisaari, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Pukkala, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5277, category Article
Kirsi Maasalo. (1986). Pihlajan puuaineen ominaisuuksia. Silva Fennica vol. 20 no. 3 article id 5277. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15456
English title: Properties of the wood of the rowan tree (Sorbus aucuparia).

The basic density of the wood of the rowan tree (Sorbus aucuparia L.) is almost the same along the stem but that of the bark is increasing along the stem. The moisture content of the wood and of the bark is increasing along the stem. Its strength in the bending and in the compression is high. The volume shrinkage is high.

The PDF includes an abstract in Finnish

  • Maasalo, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5275, category Article
Pirkko Velling, Gérard Nepveu. (1986). Männyn puuaineen laadun ja tuotoksen vaihtelu suomalaisessa provenienssikoesarjassa. Silva Fennica vol. 20 no. 3 article id 5275. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15454
English title: Variation of wood quality and yield in a Finnish series of provenance trials on Scots pine.

The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of the origin of seeds and the location of cultivation of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) on certain properties particularly important to the pulp industry. The research material consisted of six parallel trials of the same 12 provenances. Increment cores were taken of a total of 1,267 sample trees, 19 years old. The location of the trial site generally affected the properties to a larger extent than the origin of the seed. The effect of the variation of wood density and fibre yield on the cultivation values of the provenances was only a few percentages on average, however, at most the effect was nearly 10%. Eastern Finnish provenances adapted well to western Finnish conditions.

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  • Velling, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Nepveu, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5268, category Article
Kaarina Niska. (1986). Kivennäismaan ravinnemäärien ilmaisutapa. Silva Fennica vol. 20 no. 2 article id 5268. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15447
English title: Expressing the nutrient concentrations of mineral soils.

Gravimetrically expressed nutrient concentrations of soil analysis were converted to volumetric values using dry bulk densities measured in the natural state and in the laboratory after air-drying and sieving the samples. The aim was to examine, using volumetric samples representing different soil classes, exactly how the converted nutrient values calculated by this laboratory method describe volumetric nutrient contents in undisturbed soil. In the fine soil classes undisturbed bulk density was higher than laboratory bulk density and converted nutrient concentrations were too small. In coarser soil classes the reverse was true, and the values were too high.

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  • Niska, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5238, category Article
Matti Kärkkäinen. (1985). Suomalaisen kuusen puuaineen vertailua Keski-Euroopassa kasvaneiden kuusi- ja jalokuusilajien puuaineeseen. Silva Fennica vol. 19 no. 2 article id 5238. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15417
English title: Norway spruce wood grown in Finland compared with spruce and fir wood grown in Central Europe.

The aim of this literature review was to compare Finnish Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.) sawn goods to Central European spruce sawn goods which contain fir in some amount. However, it was found that no statistically valid comparisons have been made. Therefore, conclusions have been based mainly on the relationship between various properties and growth rate. According to this analysis, most properties of Finnish spruce are better, although small in practice.

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  • Kärkkäinen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5231, category Article
Matti Kärkkäinen, Michel Marcus. (1985). Shrinkage properties of Norway spruce wood. Silva Fennica vol. 19 no. 1 article id 5231. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15410

Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.) boards sawn from outer layers of logs were sampled from a sawmill in Northern Finland and another in Southern Finland. Test pieces 20 mm x 20 mm x 20 mm were selected according to maximum variation in growth ring width. Volumetric and longitudinal shrinkage from a soaked to a dry condition were measured. It was found that wood density correlated positively with the volumetric shrinkage but negatively with the longitudinal shrinkage. Dry density was a better predictor than basic density. With constant density and an increase in growth ring width, there was increased shrinkage, especially in samples from Northern Finland. Besides this, when density was kept constant, the shrinkage was higher in the spruce wood from Southern Finland than from Northern Finland.

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  • Kärkkäinen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Marcus, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5231, category Article
Matti Kärkkäinen, Michel Marcus. (1985). Shrinkage properties of Norway spruce wood. Silva Fennica vol. 19 no. 1 article id 5231. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15410

Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.) boards sawn from outer layers of logs were sampled from a sawmill in Northern Finland and another in Southern Finland. Test pieces 20 mm x 20 mm x 20 mm were selected according to maximum variation in growth ring width. Volumetric and longitudinal shrinkage from a soaked to a dry condition were measured. It was found that wood density correlated positively with the volumetric shrinkage but negatively with the longitudinal shrinkage. Dry density was a better predictor than basic density. With constant density and an increase in growth ring width, there was increased shrinkage, especially in samples from Northern Finland. Besides this, when density was kept constant, the shrinkage was higher in the spruce wood from Southern Finland than from Northern Finland.

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  • Kärkkäinen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Marcus, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5208, category Article
Matti Kärkkäinen. (1984). Effect of tree social status on basic density of Norway spruce. Silva Fennica vol. 18 no. 2 article id 5208. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15387

The effect of growth rate on wood basic density in even-age Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.) plantations was studied on the basis of samples collected from 53 stands; 30 trees were sampled in each stand. The prediction of basic density with the help of growth rate and some other tree characteristics could be improved if the social status of the tree was taken into account. Within a stand, the smaller trees had a lower density, while taller trees had a higher density than they should have had on the basis of growth rate alone.

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  • Kärkkäinen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5207, category Article
Seppo Kellomäki. (1984). Havaintoja puuston kasvatustiheyden vaikutuksesta mäntyjen oksikkuuteen. Silva Fennica vol. 18 no. 2 article id 5207. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15386
English title: Observations on the influence of stand density on branchiness of young Scots pines.

The study based on young Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) of varying density showed that number of living branches per whorl and total number of living branches per tree were negatively correlated with stand density. On the contrary, the number of dead branches increased with increasing stand density. The diameter of living and dead branches decreased with increasing stand density. Consequently, the branchiness, i.e. the share of the branch cross-sectional area from the surface area of the stem, decreased in dense stands compared with the thin stands. At the densest stands the branchiness, however, levelled of indicating a greater decrease of the radial growth at stems than at branches. The 2/3 power law described relatively well the relationship between stand density and mean squared branch diameter of living branches.

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  • Kellomäki, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5200, category Article
Seppo Kellomäki, Timo Nevalainen. (1983). Näkökohtia puuston tiheyden ja puiden koon välisestä suhteesta. Silva Fennica vol. 17 no. 4 article id 5200. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15183
English title: Relationship between stand density on tree size.

Two Japanese models regarding the within-stand competition have been reviewed on the basis of relevant literature. Competition-density and 3/2 th power models seem to be applicable also into tree stands. The latter model has been applied into the material obtained from literature. Computations showed consistancy with the results obtained elsewhere in the world. It is concluded that also in Finnish conditions the 3/2 th power law may have great potentials in describing the effects of stand density on tree size.

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  • Kellomäki, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Nevalainen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5199, category Article
Pekka Saranpää. (1983). Puuaineen tiheyden ja vuosiluston leveyden vaikutus kuusen iskutaivutuslujuuteen Etelä- ja Pohjois-Suomessa. Silva Fennica vol. 17 no. 4 article id 5199. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15182
English title: The influence of basic density and growth ring width on the impact strength of Norway spruce wood from Southern and Northern Finland.

Basic density and absorbed energy in impact bending were measured for 500 Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.) samples from Northern and Southern Finland. Statistical analysis showed that the relationship between impact strength and basic density was significant and regression analysis showed that it was linear.

Furthermore, with constant density, the impact strength was higher in Northern than in Southern Finland. This was due to growth ring width: i.e. when density was kept constant the impact strength increased with decreasing growth ring width. In addition, when the growth ring width was kept constant, the basic density of wood was higher in Southern Finland than in Northern Finland.

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  • Saranpää, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5185, category Article
Seppo Kellomäki. (1983). Männyn oksien murtolujuus. Silva Fennica vol. 17 no. 2 article id 5185. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15101
English title: Strength of Scots pine branches.

Empirical measurements showed that the strength of a dead branch of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) was related to the second power of the branch diameter and the third power of the basic density of branch wood. The same factors affected also the strength of living branches. Especially, the contribution of wood density was important. The significance of the results is discussed considering the natural process of self-pruning and its effect on the branchiness of the stem.

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  • Kellomäki, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5182, category Article
Matti Kärkkäinen, Herman Hakala. (1983). Kuusitukin koon vaikutus sivulautojen taivutus- ja puristuslujuuteen. Silva Fennica vol. 17 no. 2 article id 5182. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15098
English title: Effect of log size on the bending and compression strength of side boards in Norway spruce.

In order to evaluate the strength properties of boards made from small and large Norway spruce (Picea abies) butt logs, 15 small (top end diameter 13 cm) and 15 large (top end diameter 25 cm) logs were sampled from a sawmill in Finland. From each log two test pieces were made in order to measure the bending and compression strength, dry density and average ring width.

The boards from small logs were stronger and their density higher. When the differences between groups were analysed it was found that the strength was determined by the density and ring width. When the density was kept constant, the increase in ring width had a decreasing effect on the strength properties. Because there was a negative correlation between ring width and density, ring width alone had a great effect on the strength properties.

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  • Kärkkäinen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Hakala, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5181, category Article
Matti Kärkkäinen, Olle Dumell. (1983). Kuusipuun taivutuslujuuden riippuvuus tiheydestä ja vuosiluston leveydestä Etelä- ja Pohjois-Suomessa. Silva Fennica vol. 17 no. 2 article id 5181. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15097
English title: Effect of basic density and growth ring width on the bending strength of Norway spruce wood from southern and northern Finland.

A population consisting of 450 Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.) samples was gathered from northern and southern Finnish wood. The static bending strength was affected greatly by the density of the wood. However, keeping the density constant, the bending strength was higher in northern than in southern Finnish wood. The reason was the effect of the growth ring width.

The basic density was affected by the growth rate. Keeping the growth ring width constant, the basic density was over 5 kg/m3 lower in northern than in southern Finnish wood. This result supports the earlier findings on the effect of latitude.

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  • Kärkkäinen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Dumell, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5161, category Article
Juhani Päivänen. (1982). Physical properties of peat samples in relation to shrinkage upon drying. Silva Fennica vol. 16 no. 3 article id 5161. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15076

The study discusses the amount of shrinkage of volumetric undisturbed peat samples when drying to an oven-dry (105°C) condition. The amount of shrinkage is related to various physical properties of peat. In addition, some observations were performed on the shrinkage phenomenon during the drying process. The study results may be used when predicting the shrinkage of peat samples with various peat properties. Knowledge of this kind is particularly important in connection with peat harvesting.

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  • Päivänen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5161, category Article
Juhani Päivänen. (1982). Physical properties of peat samples in relation to shrinkage upon drying. Silva Fennica vol. 16 no. 3 article id 5161. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15076

The study discusses the amount of shrinkage of volumetric undisturbed peat samples when drying to an oven-dry (105°C) condition. The amount of shrinkage is related to various physical properties of peat. In addition, some observations were performed on the shrinkage phenomenon during the drying process. The study results may be used when predicting the shrinkage of peat samples with various peat properties. Knowledge of this kind is particularly important in connection with peat harvesting.

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  • Päivänen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5155, category Article
K. M. Bhat, Matti Kärkkäinen. (1982). Wood anatomy and physical properties of the wood and bark in Betula nana growing in Finland. Silva Fennica vol. 16 no. 1 article id 5155. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15070

Eighty Betula nana samples were collected from three swamp sites. In the butt portion of the dwarf shrub the average number of growth rings was 12 and the average diameter of the sprouts 6 mm. The basic density of wood was 457 kg/m3 and that of bark 544 kg/m3. The proportion of bark was 32–38% of weight or volume. The vessel elements and fibres were short and their diameter small. The proportion of vessels was 15%, that of fibres 70% and that of rays 15%.

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  • Bhat, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kärkkäinen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5128, category Article
Paavo J. Ollinmaa. (1981). Eräistä ojitetuilla soilla kasvaneen puun fysikaalisista ominaisuuksista. Silva Fennica vol. 15 no. 3 article id 5128. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15069
English title: Physical properties of wood growing on drained swamps.

The objective of the investigation was to determine the differences between timber grown on a peatland before and after draining, in respect of compressive strength parallel to the grain, static bending strength and density. In addition, the characteristics of boundary zone between the wood formed before, and after the draining with wider growth rings was studied. 41 Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and 22 Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.) trees were studied.

The compressive strength of pine usually decreased from the butt end upwards, but no trend was observed in spruce wood. In coniferous trees, wide-ringed wood formed subsequent to draining was slightly lighter than the close-ringed wood produced prior the draining. The density of pine as well as spruce increases as the width of the growth rings decrease up to a certain limit. The strength of the different kinds of wood seems to decrease from the butt end upwards.

In both species, the compressive strength parallel to the grain and the bending strength are lowest in such wood that contains exclusively wide-ringed wood formed subsequent to draining. Also, compressive and bending strength increase with decreasing width of the growth rings. The longitudinal shrinkage of compression wood in spruce was several times that of normal wood, and the bending strength was lower than that of normal wood particularly in spruce. The compressive strength parallel to the grain in dry condition was, however, higher than in normal wood both in pine and spruce.

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  • Ollinmaa, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5115, category Article
K. M. Bhat, Matti Kärkkäinen. (1981). Variation in structure and selected properties of Finnish birch wood. II. Silva Fennica vol. 15 no. 2 article id 5115. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15056

The anatomical variation of a lateral root was compared with that of the stem of the same tree at breast height by concentrating on the intrelationships of certain anatomical features in Betula pendula and B. pubescens. The results showed that root wood has several essential features of stem wood, such as gelatinous fibres, growth eccentricity, scalariform perforation plates in the vessels and pith flecks. However, some of the anatomical differences are significant. The differences between the species were more pronounced in the root than in the stem anatomy.

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  • Bhat, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kärkkäinen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5113, category Article
K. M. Bhat, Matti Kärkkäinen. (1981). Wood anatomy and physical properties of wood and bark in Betula tortuosa Ledeb. Silva Fennica vol. 15 no. 2 article id 5113. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15054

Ten trees of mountain birch (Betula tortuosa Ledeb, now Betula pubescens subsp. czerepanovii) with an average age of 39 years were sampled in northern Lapland in Finland. The average green density of wood was 589 kg/m3 and that of bark 941 kg/m3. The basic densities were 520 kg/m3 and 559 kg/m3, respectively. The basic density increased only little from the pith to the surface. In contrast, the number of bars in the perforation plates of the vessels increased considerably in the same direction. The average number of bars was 17.3.

The PDF includes a summary in Finnish.

  • Bhat, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kärkkäinen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5111, category Article
Seppo Kellomäki. (1981). Effect of the within-stand light conditions on the share of stem, branch and needle growth in a twenty-year-old Scots pine stand. Silva Fennica vol. 15 no. 2 article id 5111. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15052

The share of stem, branch and needle growth was dependent on the within-stand light regime in a young Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stand. The share of needle growth increased at the expense of stem and branch growth in poor light conditions. In good light condition the share of branch wood increased substantially. The share of stem wood growth was greatest in moderate shading, emphasizing the role of an adequate stand density for growing high-quality timber. The basic density of the stem wood was considerably greater in suppressed trees than in dominating trees. The differences were related to the illumination of the crown system.

The PDF includes a summary in Finnish.

  • Kellomäki, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5097, category Article
K. M. Bhat, Ari Ferm, Matti Kärkkäinen. (1981). On the properties of one-year shoots of Betula pubescens Ehrh. and Salix spp. Silva Fennica vol. 15 no. 1 article id 5097. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15038

Downy birch (Betula pubescens Ehrh.) trees growing on a drained peatland were cut during dormancy. The properties of the one-year old shoots produced by the stumps were measured in the autumn after one growing season. The one-year old willow shoots (a mixture of Salix phylicifolia L., S. pentandra L. and S. caprea L.) were collected from an abandoned field.

The basic density of unbarked shoots was 443 kg/m3 for birch and 346 kg/m3 for willow. The basic density of the bark was much higher than that of the wood. The effect of shoot length on the properties was small with the exception of cellular proportions. The fibre percentage increased and vessel percentage decreased with increasing shoot length.

The PDF includes a summary in Finnish.

  • Bhat, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Ferm, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kärkkäinen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5092, category Article
Seppo Kellomäki, Markku Kanninen. (1980). Eco-physiological studies on young Scots pine stands. IV. Silva Fennica vol. 14 no. 4 article id 5092. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15033

Crown and stem growth of young Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris L.) were studied in relation to photosynthate supply and light condition in a stand. The magnitude of needle and bud formation, and radial and height growth were to a great extent dependent on the photosynthate supply. However, in shaded conditions the growth of each characteristics was greater than expected on the basis of photosynthate supply. In the stem system this was especially apparent for height growth. Consequently, height growth was favoured at the expense of radial growth in shaded conditions. It also appeared that the basic density of wood was negatively related to both tree position and photosynthate supply.

The PDF includes a summary in Finnish.

  • Kellomäki, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kanninen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5091, category Article
K. M. Bhat. (1980). Variation in structure and selected properties of Finnish birch wood. I. Silva Fennica vol. 14 no. 4 article id 5091. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15032

Variation of wood characteristics was studied in two mature trees of Betula pendula Roth and two of B. pubescens Ehrh. by stressing the interrelationships of some of the structural features, basic density and shrinkage. Correlation analysis revealed that basic density was related to some of the variables studied, viz: number of rings (age) and distance from pith, height from the ground, ring width, fibre length and double wall thickness. Multiple regression equation showed that age from pith and height from the ground explained 80% of variation of basic density in B. pendula. Two structural variables, viz: fibre wall thickness and ring width accounted for only 28% of variation of basic density in B. pubescens. No significant relations could be found between shrinkage and any of the wood parameters measured in B. pendula while some of the relationships were significant in B. pubescens. However, only 55% of variation of volumetric shrinkage was explained by two related factors, viz: basic density and moisture content while only 35% of variation of tangential shrinkage was explained by ring width and fibre width. Increase in fibre length was highly associated with the increase in fibre width, double wall thickness and vessel length in either species.

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  • Bhat, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5079, category Article
Seppo Kellomäki, Pertti Hari, Pirkko Ilonen, Markku Kanninen. (1980). Eco-physiological studies on young Scots pine stands. II. Silva Fennica vol. 14 no. 3 article id 5079. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15020

The technique of double normalizing, i.e. normalizing the relative needle biomass and the length of the living crown system, is applied to the modelling of the distribution of needle biomass in the canopy of young Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stands. The study based on the parameters of β-function shows that at the individual-tree level, the variance in needle distribution was not closely associated with any tree characteristics. A shift in the point of maximum needle biomass upwards unsuppressed trees was, however, evident. This was associated with an increase in the height of the trees. At the stand level, the stand mean height and stand density had an equal and a rather high potential for explaining the variance in the needle distribution. The normalized crowns are utilized in models for determining light extinction in the crown. A special technique for determining the amount of photosynthates available for growth in a particular tree is presented.

The PDF includes a summary in Finnish.

  • Kellomäki, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Hari, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Ilonen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kanninen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5063, category Article
Pirkko Velling. (1980). Variation in the density of wood of different Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst.) origins in provenance tests. Silva Fennica vol. 14 no. 1 article id 5063. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15004

The study concerned with variations in the density of the wood of different provenances in provenance test series of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) RH. Karst.), established in 1931. Increment cores were collected from 10 sample trees from each sample block. The density of the pine wood was noticeably higher than that of spruce. The basic density was in average 450 kg/m3 for Scots pine, and the variation between different origins was 3–9%, while the average basic density of spruce was under 400 kg/m3 and the variation 3–10%. Statistically significant differences were found between the mean basic densities of different provenances in all sub-experiments for spruce, but only in one pine sub-experiment. However, these differences were not due to the altitude or latitude of the place of the origin. Volume growth seems to be the dominant component in the formation of dry matter yield.

The PDF includes a summary in Finnish.

  • Velling, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5048, category Article
Seppo Kellomäki. (1979). The effect of solar radiation and air temperature on basic density of Scots pine wood. Silva Fennica vol. 13 no. 4 article id 5048. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a14905

The effect of solar radiation and air temperature on the basic density of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) wood has been investigated on the basis of material obtained from the literature. Solar radiation seemed to affect basic density during earlywood formation. Temperature had the greatest effect on basic density  in late summer. The varying effects of radiation and temperature seemed to be associated with the dynamics of the crown system of trees. Especially the capacity of the crown system to produce the amount of photosynthesis needed in tracheid growth is assumed to be of importance in controlling the variation in the basic density of Scots pine wood. Growth of thracheids from the point of view of photosynthate supply is discussed.

The PDF includes a summary in Finnish.

  • Kellomäki, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5015, category Article
Seppo Kellomäki. (1979). On geoclimatic variation in basic density of Scots pine wood. Silva Fennica vol. 13 no. 1 article id 5015. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a14869

The effect of temperature and water supply in the basic density of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) wood was studied on the basis of material obtained from the literature. On a monthly basis, the basic density increased with increasing mean temperature for June, July and August. The rainfall in these months had no detectable effect on the basic density except through the difference between rainfall and evaporation in July. On a yearly basis, the basic density increased with increasing mean temperature, temperature sum and length of growth period. The effect of water supply on the basic density was evident, and a linear relationship between basic density and annual rainfall was detected. The variation in basic density was, however, explained only partly by the chosen factors. Possible reasons for the poor explanatory power have been discussed.

The PDF includes a summary in Finnish.

  • Kellomäki, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5005, category Article
Matti Kärkkäinen. (1978). Kuorinnan vaikutus pinon tiiviyteen. Silva Fennica vol. 12 no. 3 article id 5005. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a14859
English title: The effect of barking on the pile density.

According to the available literature, the times when pulpwood limbing was made by axe and barking by hand tools, barking either had no effect on the pile density (if limbing quality was good) or increased pile density (if limbing was bad). When rotary barking machines are used, the branch stumps remain intact during barking. Therefore, if there are branch stumps in the pulpwood, barking decreases the pile density. Nowadays, when power saw limbing is a common practice in Finland, barking presumably greatly decreases the pile density, due to the fact that in power saw limbing branch stumps are numerous and high. Therefore, the method to estimate the solid volume of a pile of unbarked pulpwood are not applicable to barked pulpwood without modification.

The PDF includes a summary in English.

  • Kärkkäinen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 4989, category Article
Matti Kärkkäinen. (1978). Havaintoja iän vaikutuksesta lehtikuusen puuaineen tiheyteen. Silva Fennica vol. 12 no. 1 article id 4989. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a14843
English title: Observations on the effect of age on the basic density of larch wood.

About 100 years old larch (Larix sibirica Lebed. And L. decidua Mill.) trees were felled and the basic density samples taken from the stump level were determined. The number of trees was 21 and number of samples 378. The maximum basic density was reached at the age of 40–60 years, as counted from the pith. The basic density decreased as the width of the growth rings increased or the amount of heartwood decreased. The average basic density of the whole disc was 543 kg/m3 in L. sibirica and 497 kg/m3 in L. decidua. The basic densities of bark were 328 kg/m3 and 286 kg/m3, respectively. 

The PDF includes a summary in English. 

  • Kärkkäinen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 4987, category Article
Matti Kärkkäinen. (1978). Havaintoja kokopuuhakkeen tiheyden laskemisesta. Silva Fennica vol. 12 no. 1 article id 4987. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a14841
English title: Observations on the calculations of the basic density of total tree chips.
Original keywords: kokopuuhake; hake; menetelmät
English keywords: chips; basic density; methods

In this study two methods of determining the basic density of total tree chips are compared. The method of Mäkelä (1977) is based on the volumes of Scots pine, Norway spruce, birch, and alder in a logging area, and the age of the trees. In the other method the basic density of total tree chips is measured by the common displacement method. The correlation was 0,730 in the material of 22 logging areas. Besides this it was found that the basic density of chips increases as the size of the chip particles increases with the exception of the smallest particles.

The PDF includes a summary in English.

  • Kärkkäinen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 4970, category Article
Markku Mäkelä. (1977). Metsähakkeen tiheyden laskeminen. Silva Fennica vol. 11 no. 2 article id 4970. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a14821
English title: Calculating the basic density of whole tree- and logging residue chips.

A method is presented in this study for calculating the basic density of whole tree- and logging residue chips and the results of trial measurements on some commonly used chip sorts. The basic density of Scots pine whole tree chips was found to be 1–18 kg/m3 smaller than that of pine pulpwood of the same age. The basic density of Norway spruce whole tree chips was 4–22 kg/m3 greater than that of similar aged pulpwood. The basic density of birch whole tree chips was 4–16 kg/m3 and grey alder whole tree chips 7–24 kg/m3 greater than pulpwood of the same age. The basic density of conifer logging residue chips was considerably greater than that of pine and spruce whole tree ships.

The PDF includes a summary in English.

  • Mäkelä, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 4964, category Article
Seppo Kellomäki, Pertti Hari, Eero Väisänen. (1977). Annual production of some forest mosses as a function of light available for photosynthesis. Silva Fennica vol. 11 no. 1 article id 4964. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a14815

The aim of the present paper was to study the annual production of Pleurozium schreberi (Brid.) Mitt., Hylocomnium splendens (Hedw.) B.S.G and Dicranum polysetum Sw. as a function of light available for photosynthesis. The productivity of the above moss species is studied using the harvested quadrats method in Norway spruce (Picea abies) stands of the Myrtillus site type representing different stand density classes (basal area from 0 to 34 m2/ha) in Southern Finland.

The annual production of each species in different stands was correlated with the amount of light available for photosynthesis i.e. with the photosynthetic production. Functions for the dependence of productivity on light conditions were produced for each species. The individual functions and their ecological significance is discussed. The adaptation of each species to low light intensity is evident since no meaningful addition to production takes place when the photosynthetic light ratio reaches values greater than 0.3–0.4. In other words, the level of photosynthesis which is 30–40% of that possible in the open, provides sufficient supply of carbohydrates or the basic functions of the moss species studied. Pleurozium schreberi and Dicranum polysetum seem to have greater light requirements than Hylocomnium splendens.

The PDF includes a summary in Finnish.

  • Kellomäki, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Hari, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Väisänen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 4958, category Article
Matti Kärkkäinen. (1977). Araukaarian ja männyn puuaineen ominaisuuksien vertailua. Silva Fennica vol. 11 no. 1 article id 4958. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a14809
English title: Comparison of wood properties of Parana pine and Scots pine.

According to the available literature, the appearance of Parana pine (Araucaria angustifolia (Bertol.) Kuntze) wood resembles that of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.). The anatomy is quite different, however. There are no resin canals and fusiform rays with resin canals in Parana pine. They are abundant in Scots pine, however. The basic density of Parana pine is higher. In both species the density increases from the pith outwards, the maximum being reached at the age of 100 years. Compression wood is more common in Parana pine than in Scots pine, and this makes the longitudinal shrinkage of Parana pine greater than that of Scots pine. Otherwise the shrinkage properties do not differ. The mechanical strength is of the same magnitude with the exception of hardness, where Parana pine is superior.

The PDF includes a summary in English.

  • Kärkkäinen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 4948, category Article
Matti Kärkkäinen. (1976). Puun ja kuoren tiheys ja kosteus sekä kuoren osuus koivun, kuusen ja männyn oksissa. Silva Fennica vol. 10 no. 3 article id 4948. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a14794
English title: Density and moisture content of wood and bark, and bark percentage in the branches of birch, Norway spruce and Scots pine.

In the study the proportion of branch samples of various diameter were studied. The branches were taken from small trees to be harvested by total tree chipping method. The material consisted of 1,056 branch samples of birch (Betula verrucosa, now B. pendula Roth, and Betula pubescens Erhr.), Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) at intervals of 20 cm along each branch.

With exception of the basic density of bark, there was a relation between all the other properties which were studied and the diameter. Even when the effect of diameter was eliminated, in many cases the effect of the distance of the samples from the stem became apparent.

The PDF includes a summary in English.

  • Kärkkäinen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 4947, category Article
Matti Kärkkäinen. (1976). Kokopuuhakkeen tiheyden mittaaminen. Silva Fennica vol. 10 no. 3 article id 4947. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a14793
English title: Measurement of basic density of total tree chips.
Original keywords: hake; mittausmenetelmät; tiheys

The paper describes a method for the measurement of basic density of total tree chips. In the method the chips are placed in a container, which is immersed in a cylinder full of water, and the container is weighted at two levels. In the upper part of the cylinder the pressure against the air bubbles is smaller than in the lower level. In this method, the effect of air bubbles in the result can be eliminated. Besides this, due to homogenization of the material to be measured only small number of samples are needed for the estimation of the average basic density.

The PDF includes a summary in English.

  • Kärkkäinen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 4784, category Article
Matti Leikola, Pentti Pylkkö. (1969). Verhopuuston tiheyden vaikutus metsikön minimilämpötiloihin hallaöinä. Silva Fennica vol. 3 no. 1 article id 4784. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a14570
English title: Influence of stand density on the minimum temperatures during frost nights.

The objective of this investigation was to study the influence of stand density of white birch (Betula pubescens Ehrl.) on the minimum temperatures in the stand during the growing season, and the actual minimum temperatures of the leading shoot of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.) seedlings growing in the open. The 40-year-old uniform white birch stand was situated in 142 m above the sea level in Southern Finland. The stand was treated with thinnings of three different densities in 1961.

Air temperature was recorded in four sample plots at heights of 0.1 m, 0.5 m, 1.0 m, 2 m and 4 m. In the stand of moderate density, temperatures were measured at heights of 6.0 m, and in the stand of full density at 6.0 m, 8.0 m and 10.0 m.

The temperature differences between stands of various densities proved to be rather small. Especially the thinnest stand differed very little from the open area. The soil surface has in all cases been warm compared with the higher air layers indicating meadow-fog-type by Geier (1965). On cloudy or windy weather all the temperature profiles in the various stands resembled each other. The difference between the air temperature and temperature of the spruce shoot was greatest at midnight and decreased steadily thereafter.

The problem in using shelter stands for spruce regeneration areas is that optimum shelter stand density is difficult to define. Already a thin shelter stand causes drawbacks to the young seedlings, but in order to be effective enough against early frosts, the shelter stand should be comparatively dense.

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  • Leikola, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Pylkkö, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 4783, category Article
Juhani Päivänen. (1969). The bulk density of peat and its determination. Silva Fennica vol. 3 no. 1 article id 4783. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a14569

This study determined the correlation between the bulk density, humification degree and laboratory volume weight of the surface peat of virgin and drained peatlands. The material consists of 316 peat samples 250 cc in volume.

The correlation between bulk density and the laboratory volume weight was found to be close. Eliminating the ash and moisture content of air-dry samples did not improve the correlation. There were distinct level differences among peat types; difference between bulk density and laboratory volume weight was the greatest for Sphagnum and the smallest for woody peats. The Carex peats were intermediate. The water content at sampling may partly determine these differences. When the data were treated as a whole, the difference between bulk density and laboratory volume weight seemed to increase, as the water content increased.

The correlation was also close between bulk density and the degree of humification. For all data, multivariable correlation analysis revealed that bulk density was determined for the largest part by the degree of humification, least by the water content at sampling, laboratory volume weight being intermediate. Thus, already the determination of the degree of humification provides a clear picture of the bulk density for each peat type. It can be also determined by fair accuracy on the basis of the laboratory volume weight. The bulk density is required for e.g. water regime studies, to convert the water content of peat measured in weight units into volume percentages.

The PDF includes a summary in Finnish.

  • Päivänen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 7678, category Article
Lauri. Valsta. (1992). An optimization model for Norway spruce management based on individual-tree growth models. Acta Forestalia Fennica no. 232 article id 7678. https://doi.org/10.14214/aff.7678

A nonlinear programming algorithm was combined with two individual-tree growth simulators consisting of distance-independent diameter and height growth models and mortality models. Management questions that can be addressed by the optimization model include the timing, intensity and type of thinning, rotation age, and initial density. The results were calculated for Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.) stands on Oxalis-Myrtillus site in Southern Finland, where the stand density after clearing of a seedling stand is about 2,000 trees/ha.

The optimum thinning programs were characterized by late first thinnings (at dominant height of 15–17 m) and relatively high growing stock levels. It was optimal to thin from above, unless mean annual increment was maximized instead of an economic objective. In most cases, the optimum number of thinnings was two or three. Compared to a no-thinning alternative, thinnings increased revenues by 15 –45% depending on the objective of stand management. Optimum rotation was strongly dependent on the interest rate.

Hooke and Jeeves’ direct search method was used for determining optimum solutions. The performance of the optimization algorithm was examined in terms of the number of functional evaluations and the equivalence of the objective function values of repeated optimizations.

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  • Valsta, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 7677, category Article
Risto Heikkilä, Timo Mikkonen. (1992). Effects of density of young Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) stand on moose (Alces alces) browsing. Acta Forestalia Fennica no. 231 article id 7677. https://doi.org/10.14214/aff.7677

The study was carried out at Padasjoki, Southern Finland, where moose (Alces alces L.) density on the winter range had been over 1.5 individuals/km2. Moose browsing intensity, expressed in terms of number of twigs eaten and biomass used, increased with stand density (biomass). Total biomass consumption (dry weight) per sample plot and per sapling. The number of bites increased, but the percentage biomass removed did not differ when stand density increased. A relatively large bite size was observed on the plots of low stand density. The quantity of food, which on average was of relatively low quality, was obviously important due to the benefit gained through reducing the search time.

The nutritive value of the browse, expressed in terms of chemical compounds indicating low food digestibility, was lower in the dense than in the sparse Scots pine stand. However, the amount of crude protein and arginine were relatively high in the dense stand. We concluded that shading affected the nutritional status of saplings on high density plots.

Although the biomass removed by moose per sapling was high for low density plots, the remaining biomass was larger than that on the high-density plots owing to the relatively large twig biomass of saplings. The number of saplings per hectare without main stem breakage increased significantly as stand density increased.

The PDF includes a summary in Finnish.

  • Heikkilä, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Mikkonen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 7631, category Article
Carl Johan Westman. (1983). Taimitarhamaiden fysikaalisia ja kemiallisia ominaisuuksia sekä niiden suhde orgaanisen aineksen määrään. Acta Forestalia Fennica no. 184 article id 7631. https://doi.org/10.14214/aff.7631
English title: Physical and physio-chemical properties of forest tree nursery soils and their relation to the amount of organic matter.

The aims of the present study were to determine physical and physio-chemical properties of some Finnish forest tree nursery soils, and to examine relationships between these properties and the amount of organic matter in the soil.

The following soil tillage layer properties of 33 fields belonging to 8 forest tree nurseries were determined: soil particle size distribution, organic matter content, bulk density and density of solids, total pore space, soil water volume at potentials pF 2.0 and 4.2, available water content and air space at potential pF 2.0, active acidity, electrical conductivity index and cation exchange capacities at pH 4.5 and 8.0. The soil texture class of the tillage layer parent material was sand, only in a few cases did higher percentage of silt and clay indicate a morainic nature of parent material. The amount of organic material in the soils varied within wide limits, reflecting differences in amelioration policy between the single nurseries.

Relationships between the physical properties of the soil parent material and those related to fertility were in most cases strongly influenced by the amount of soil organic matter. Soil density values decreased as the organic matter content increased from 2 to 25%, giving rise to the increase in the total pore space. However, the amount of water held at potential pF 2.0 and the available water content did not increase with increasing organic matter content. This was due to the absence of the particle fraction in the sand. Nursery soil amelioration, involving in most cases a mixture of Sphagnum peat with sand, thus gives rise to an increase in the content of drainable water.

Cation exchange capacities were positively correlated with the organic matter content. However, the absolute number of exchange sites expressed as equivalents in the tillage layer did not increase in accordance with the increase in organic matter content due to the influence of the organic matter content upon the ratio of solids in the voids.

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  • Westman, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 7624, category Article
Pertti Hari, Seppo Kellomäki, Annikki Mäkelä, Pirkko Ilonen, Markku Kanninen, Eeva Korpilahti, Markku Nygren. (1982). Metsikön varhaiskehityksen dynamiikka. Acta Forestalia Fennica no. 177 article id 7624. https://doi.org/10.14214/aff.7624
English title: Dynamics of early development of tree stand.

The report concludes a series of studies on the early development of young Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stands. The basis assumption made in the study series was that the within-stand light regime is the main driving force for total tree growth and its allocation of photosynthates for crown, stem and root growth. An individual tree growing in a stand under a varying light regime which is controlled by the stand structure, is the basic unit used in the study. The photosynthesis of an individual tree is determined by the light regime. The stand is formed from individual trees.

The model is applied in simulation of the growth and development of tree stands. Several computer runs representing various densities, height distributions and tree species mixtures were carried out. Potential application areas, properties of the model and future needs of investigations are discussed.

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  • Hari, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kellomäki, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Mäkelä, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Ilonen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kanninen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Korpilahti, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Nygren, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 7613, category Article
Pekka Kilkki, Unto Väisänen. (1969). Determination of the optimum cutting policy for the forest stand by means of dynamic programming. Acta Forestalia Fennica no. 102 article id 7613. https://doi.org/10.14214/aff.7613

The purpose of this study was determining the optimum cutting program for forest stands by the application of dynamic programming. Calculations have been made for even-aged Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stands in Southern Finland, aged 50-100 years. Three logging cost levels, thinning from below and from above, and rates of interest of 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5% was applied. Both optimum routes and the economic results of different cutting programs was analysed.

According to the results, the higher the rate of interest is, the lower the density remains, and shorter the rotation is. The starting level of the growing stock may influence the treatment of the stand for tens of years. If logging costs change, so that harvesting small wood becomes relatively more expensive in the future, the density of growing stock will increase. However, heavy thinnings today are recommendable, to avoid expensive thinnings in the future.

The density of the growing stock should be higher if thinning from above is applied, instead of thinning from below. The growth of the stands thinned from below needs to be greater than the growth of stands thinned from above, to justify thinnings from below. Too high density often results in larger losses than do too low a density or the wrong rotation. Thinnings seem to be profitable even at much higher logging costs than those of today. The maturity of the stand is determined both by the age and the density of the growing stock. The stand may be mature because of great age, high density combined with a relatively high age, or because the growing stock is too low in density.

The PDF includes a summary in Finnish.

  • Kilkki, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Väisänen, ORCID ID:E-mail:

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