Current issue: 53(2)

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Silva Fennica 1926-1997
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Acta Forestalia Fennica
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Articles containing the keyword 'exotics'.

Category: Research note

article id 1321, category Research note
Sofia Bäcklund, Mari T. Jönsson, Joachim Strengbom, Göran Thor. (2015). Composition of functional groups of ground vegetation differ between planted stands of non-native Pinus contorta and native Pinus sylvestris and Picea abies in northern Sweden. Silva Fennica vol. 49 no. 2 article id 1321. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1321
Highlights: Differences in ground vegetation patterns can be linked to tree species, forest stand age and differences in canopy cover; Vascular plant cover was higher in stands of P. contorta than in stands of both native tree species; The overall differences and similarities between P. contorta and the two native conifers were not consistent over the different age classes.
Intensified forestry increases the interest in replacing native tree species with fast growing non-native species. However, consequences for native biodiversity and ecosystem functioning are poorly understood. We compared cover and composition of major functional groups of ground vegetation between planted stands of non-native Pinus contorta Dougl. var. latifolia Engelm. and native conifers Pinus sylvestris L. and Picea abies (L.) H. Karst. in northern boreal Sweden. We quantified the ground cover of lichens, bryophytes, vascular plants and ground without vegetation (bare ground) in 96 stands covering three different age classes (15, 30 and 85 years old). Our study revealed differences in ground vegetation patterns between non-native and native managed forests, and that these differences are linked to stand age and differences in canopy cover. Total vascular plant cover increased with increasing stand age for all tree species, with P. contorta stands having higher cover than both native conifers. The ground cover of lichens was, although generally low, highest in stands of Pinus sylvestris. P. abies stands had a lower cover of vascular plants, but bare ground was more common compared with P. contorta. Our results suggest that the use of P. contorta as an alternative tree species in Fennoscandian forestry will influence native ground vegetation patterns. This influence is likely to change with time and future research should consider both temporal and landscape-scale effects from shifting tree-species dominance to Pinus contorta and other non-native tree species.
  • Bäcklund, Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7044, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: sofia.backlund@slu.se (email)
  • Jönsson,  The Swedish Species Information Centre, P.O. Box 7007, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: mari.jonsson@slu.se
  • Strengbom, Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7044, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: joachim.strengbom@slu.se
  • Thor, Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7044, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: goran.thor@slu.se

Category: Article

article id 7667, category Article
Veli Pohjonen. (1991). Selection of species and clones for biomass willow forestry in Finland. Acta Forestalia Fennica no. 221 article id 7667. https://doi.org/10.14214/aff.7667

Willow (Salix sp.) species and clones have been selected in Finland, originally for basket willow husbandry, since 1910's. Screening for biomass willows started in 1973 by the Foundation for Forest Tree Breeding. Biomass willow research for energy started in 1978. The objective of the study was, based on theoretical background, on historical record of Finnish willow research between 1910–80 and on analysis of the Finnish biomass willow research of the 1980s, a further selection of exotic and indigenous willows for energy and chemicals.

Swedish selection of 63 exotics, mainly of Salix viminalis L. and S. burjatica Nazarov, was screened in Kompparnäs willow research site in the southern coast of Finland in 1983–89. S. viminalis showed both high yield potential and good crop certainty. The yield variation in S. burjatica were big due to rust (Melampsora sp.) infection followed by lowered winter hardiness. Three recommendable S. viminalis clones for Southern Finland were found.

Finnish indigenous species were screened based on collection (375 clones) in 1974–74 of the Foundation for Forest Tree Breeding, and the Finnish 4H-organization (566 clones) in 1978–79 in test sites in Suomusjärvi, Nurmijärvi, Kannus and Haapavesi. Salix myrsinifolia Salisb. was most productive of the indigenous willows. Five recommendable clones were selected. The second most productive indigenous was S. phylicifolia, with three recommendable clones. Based on willow hybridization studies in the Finnish Forest Research Institute, a considerable additional selection effect, boosted by heterosis, was found from the progenies. Further intraspecific crossings of geographically distant clones of S. myrsinifolia are recommended.

Based on the results, S. viminalis is recommended for practical biomass forestry application in the southernmost agroclimatic zone of Finland. S. myrsinifolia is recommended for further research and development in the other zones.

The PDF includes a summary in Finnish.

  • Pohjonen, ORCID ID:E-mail:

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