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Silva Fennica 1926-1997
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Acta Forestalia Fennica
1953-1968
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Articles containing the keyword 'fungal diseases'.

Category: Article

article id 7383, category Article
Esko Kangas. (1946). Kuusikoiden kuivumisesta metsätuho- ja metsänhoidollisena kysymyksenä. Acta Forestalia Fennica vol. 52 no. 5 article id 7383. https://doi.org/10.14214/aff.7383
English title: Drying of Norway spruce stands as forest damage and forest management issues in Finland.

Observatons of drying of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) stands increased in 1930s in Southern Finland. The aim of the study was to analyse the advance and causes of drying. The work was begun in 1930s before the Second World War, and the damages caused to the forests by the war was used as supplemental observations in the study. A special method, drying analysis, was developed to study the process. It was used both in cases of insect and fungal diseases in the four research areas in Raivola and Ruotsinkylä. In addition, 7 observation areas were studied.

Several causes for drying of the trees were observed in the Norway spruce stands. These included European spruce bark beetle (Dendroctonus micans), root rot (Heterobasidion annosum), pine weevils (Pissodes sp.), bark beetles and honey fungus (Armillaria mellea).

The role of primary and secondary causes for drying, resistance of the trees and the drying process are discussed. Finally, the influence of forest management in drying process is analysed. Forests in natural state can be considered to be in an ideal balance. On the other hand, forest management can be used to maintain the vitality and resistance of the forests. Drying of Norway spruce stands can be taken into consideration when the stands are managed.

The PDF includes a summary in German.

  • Kangas, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5611, category Article
Arja Lilja, Timo Kurkela, Sakari Lilja, Risto Rikala.. (1997). Nursery practices and management of fungal diseases in forest nurseries in Finland. A review. Silva Fennica vol. 31 no. 1 article id 5611. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a8512

The purpose of this article was to collate the literature on fungal diseases that occur on seedlings in forest nurseries. It describes the symptoms of the diseases, the infection pattern of each fungus and the possibilities of controlling the diseases. As background a short introduction is given on forests and nursery practices in Finland.

  • Lilja, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kurkela, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Lilja, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Rikala., ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5216, category Article
Anna-Maija Hallaksela. (1984). Causal agents of butt-rot in Norway spruce in southern Finland. Silva Fennica vol. 18 no. 3 article id 5216. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15395

A total of 146 Norway spruce-dominated clear-cutting areas and 140 of the sample plots included in the 7th National Forest Inventory in Finland were examined during 1974–78. The micro-organisms causing decay in Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.) sample trees were identified. The most common causal agent of butt-rot was Heterbasidion annosum (Fr.) Bref. Other fungi causing decay in the spruce trees were Armillaria mellea (Vahl.) Quél, Stereum sanguinolentum (Alb. & Schw. ex Fr.), Resinicum bicolor (Alb. & Schw. ex Fr.) Parm. and Climacocystis borealis (Fr.) Kotl. & Pouz. Species of Ascocoryne were very often present in the decay. The decay caused by H. annosum was considerably more extensive than cases of decay where the fungus was not present.

The PDF includes a summary in Finnish.

  • Hallaksela, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 4858, category Article
Tauno Kallio. (1972). Erään 10-vuotiaan hybridihaapametsikön lahovikaisuus. Silva Fennica vol. 6 no. 1 article id 4858. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a14661
English title: Decay in a ten-year old stand of hybrid aspen.
Original keywords: hybridihaapa; sienitaudit; laho; bakteerit

A ten-year old stand of hybrid aspen (Populus tremula x Populus tremuloides), growing in Southern Finland on about 1.5 ha of Oxalis-Myrtillus type (OMT) soil and affected by crown blight, was examined in 1971. The study revealed that almost all trees, both those removed by thinning and the remaining growing stock, were decayed. A number of bacteria, Fungi imperfecti species and ascomycetous fungi were isolated from the discoloured heartwood of the affected trees. No fungus of the Bacidiomycetes was found in the discoloured wood material.

The PDF includes a summary in English.

  • Kallio, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 4738, category Article
Sakari Lilja. (1967). Tuomen merkityksestä kuusen tuomiruostesienen, Pucciniastrum padi (Kunze & Schm.) Diet., esiintymiselle kuusessa. Silva Fennica vol. 1 no. 1 article id 4738. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a14448
English title: Significance of the bird-cherry (Prunus padus L.) for the occurrence of the rust, Puccinastrum padi (Kunze & Schm.) in spruce.

The present study deals with the occurrence of the rust, Pucciniastrum padi (Kunze & Schm.) Diet., in the shoots and cones of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.) in the forest area of the training and experimental farm of Helsinki University at Viikki (60’10’ N; 25’ E). The most important task was to clarify the correlation between the occurrences of the disease in spruce and the abundance of the alternative host of the disease, bird-sherry (Prunus padus L.).

Infected shoots were encountered in a 17-year-old planted seedling stand of spruce. In this stand 8.4% of the seedlings were infected. The density of bird-cherry trees was in the stand higher than in the surrounding areas. The number of infected shoots was the greatest in those places where the density of bird-cherries was highest and already at a distance of some ten metres form the bird-cherry stands the degree of infection decreased considerably. The portion of infected cones in the whole material of this study was 19.5%.

The dependence of the frequency of disease on the abundance of bird-cherries at different distances from the spruce stand was studied by means of regression analysis. For this reason, the percentage infected cones were determined by sample plots and the abundance of bird-cherry trees from six zones (0–50, 50–100, 100–150, 150–200, 200–300, and 300–500 m) around each sample plot. The results showed that the dependence between the degree of infection of cones and the abundance of bird-cherry in the surroundings only reached the closest zone. There were also infected cones at greater distance, for instance, 200–300 m from the bird-cherries about 10% of the cones could be infected. Both the infected cones and shoots were longer than the healthy ones.

The PDF includes a summary in English.

  • Lilja, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 7583, category Article
Tauno Kallio. (1976). Peniophora gigantea (Fr.) Massee and wounded spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst. Part 2Peniophora gigantea ja kuusen vauriot. Osa 2. Acta Forestalia Fennica no. 149 article id 7583. https://doi.org/10.14214/aff.7583

The paper is a continuation of an earlier report by the author on the same subject (Acta Forestalia Fennica 133, 1973). Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.) wounds were inoculated with Peniophora gigantea (Phlebiopsis gigantea) and the discolorations starting from the wounds were investigated three years after the wounding. Fomes annosus (Heterobasidion annosum) had infected 17 % of the total number of wounded trees. If no microbes were growing at the furthest point of the discoloration that had started from the wound, the discoloration advanced upward from wounds made at breast height at a rate of 61 cm/year in the dominant and 36 cm/year in the suppressed trees. In the dominant trees, a year after the wound was inflicted the discoloration had advanced at a rate of 50 cm/year and after three years the rate was 61 cm/year. This difference is not significant. Where microbes were present at the furthest point of discoloration, the discoloration had advanced 27 cm/year in one year and 42 cm/year in three years. Also, this difference is not significant.

A microbe was isolated from the furthest point of discoloration in only 13 out of 42 possible cases. The most common microbe was Stereum sanguinolentum. Bacteria showed the fastest rate of advance.

The PDF includes a summary in Finnish.

  • Kallio, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 7541, category Article
Tauno Kallio. (1970). Aerial distribution of the root-rot fungus Fomes annosus (Fr.) Cooke in Finland. Acta Forestalia Fennica no. 107 article id 7541. https://doi.org/10.14214/aff.7541

An investigation into the aerial distribution of Fomes annosus (now Heterbasidion annosum) in Finland was carried out. Prevalence of the fungus in the air was estimated from cultural counts of mycelia produced by diaspores which had fallen onto spruce discs and agar plates. The influence of climate on deposition of diaspores was determined from weather recordings.

For the main study, F. annosus diaspores collected from spruce stands in Helsinki, Anjala and Jokioinen were recorded at weekly or fortnightly intervals throughout 1968. Diaspores fell during the 24-hour periods almost continuously at all three observation sites from April to November, but the deposition was most frequent from late May to the end of October. The amounts of deposition varied greatly with the observation sites, seasons of the year, and time of the day. The fall was heaviest at Anjala and slightest at Jokioinen.

Throughout the season of deposition, more diaspores were trapped on all observation sites at night than during the day. A significant positive correlation was found between the fall of F. annosus diaspores and the air temperature. Diaspores of F. annosus were found in the forest on needles and leaves, and underneath the humus layer in mineral soil. The fall of diaspores decreased as the distance from sporophores increased.

The aerial distribution of two antagonists to F. annosus, viz. Peniophora gigantea and Trichoderma viride, was also studied. It was found that the diaspores of the former fell mainly during the same seasons as those of F. annosus.

  • Kallio, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 4458, category Article
Esko Kangas. (1931). Siikakankaan mäntytaimistojen tuhoista. Silva Fennica no. 17 article id 4458. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a8999
English title: Siikakankaan mäntytaimistojen tuhoista.

Regeneration of large open areas in dry mineral soil forest sites that usually grow Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) have several problems. For instance, soil frost, snow, ground vegetation and dryness can prevent germination and growth of seedlings. The damages caused by insects and fungi in seedlings of a large burned area in Siikakangas in Southern Finland was studied. A forest fire burned the area nearly completely in 1909, and 310 hectares have been sowed or planted with mostly Scots pine during the following years. Minor areas have been regenerated with Pinus montana Noll, Pinus excelsa Lamb., Pinus murrayana Balf. and Larix sibirica Ledeb.

No completely healthy pine seedling stands could be found in the area. About 41% of the seedlings in the sample plots were damaged. The most common causes for damage were Evetria resinella (now Retinia resinella L.), Luperus pinicola (now Calomicrus pinicola (Duft.)), Pissodes notatus (now Pissodes castaneus Degeer), Evetria turionana Hb. and Hylobious abietis L. The most usual fungal disease was Lophodermium sp. Evetria resinella caused damages in all the area. Evetria turionana, Pissodes notatus and Hylobius abietina were found in the older seedling stands. Other damages were more localized. The slacks in the terrain seemed to have most damages, the original cause being probably soil frost. Some damages, as Lophodermium, were related to the density of the seedlings, especially in the sown areas. Cleaning of seedling stands could decrease these damages. Planting seems to have succeeded better than patch sowing.

The PDF includes a summary in German.

  • Kangas, ORCID ID:E-mail:

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