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Silva Fennica 1926-1997
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Articles containing the keyword 'genetic diversity'.

Category: Research article

article id 1678, category Research article
Juan F. Jimenez, Pedro Sánchez-Gómez, Jose Luis Cánovas, Isabell Hensen, Miloud Aouissat. (2017). Influence of natural habitat fragmentation on the genetic structure of Canarian populations of Juniperus turbinata. Silva Fennica vol. 51 no. 2 article id 1678. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1678
Highlights: Canarian populations of Juniperus turbinata exhibited levels of genetic diversity similar to those of mainland populations; Despite the historical geologic events occurred in Canary Islands, and the documented decrease of populations since the arrival of settlers, no genetic differentiation between islands has been observed; As it has been observed for other Macaronesian endemics, J. turbinata long dispersal ability seems to be the main force driving the genetic structure of populations.

Oceanic archipelagos provide an important platform from which to evaluate the effects of isolation and fragmentation on the genetic structure of species. As a result of oceanic isolation, such species usually show lower levels of genetic diversity and higher genetic differentiation than their mainland congeners. However, this is not necessarily the case for long distance dispersal species, whose genetic structure is not strictly defined by population isolation. We assessed the level and distribution of genetic diversity among Canarian populations of Juniperus turbinata in order to evaluate the influence of population isolation on its genetic structure. Using Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism markers, we analyzed molecular diversity among 175 individuals from five populations occurring across the Canary Island and three Moroccan populations. Principal Coordinate Analysis, neighbor joining clustering, AMOVA and Bayesian-based analysis were applied to examine population structure. Despite the documented habitat loss and decline in Canarian populations, Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism markers revealed levels of intra-population genetic diversity that were similar to those from mainland populations, and low levels of genetic differentiation. Bayesian analysis of population structure showed three main clusters, one comprising El Hierro population and a few individuals from several islands, a second cluster that grouped the remaining Canarian populations together, and a third cluster grouping Moroccan populations. Our results suggest that the main force driving the genetic structure of Canarian populations of J. turbinata is its capacity for long distance dispersal.

  • Jimenez, Departamento de Biología Vegetal (Botánica), Universidad de Murcia, Campus de Espinardo s/n, E-30100 Murcia, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail: fjimenez@um.es (email)
  • Sánchez-Gómez, Departamento de Biología Vegetal (Botánica), Universidad de Murcia, Campus de Espinardo s/n, E-30100 Murcia, Spain ORCID ID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-6754-1512 E-mail: psgomez@um.es
  • Cánovas, Departamento de Biología Vegetal (Botánica), Universidad de Murcia, Campus de Espinardo s/n, E-30100 Murcia, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail: joseluis.canovas@um.es
  • Hensen,  Institut für Biologie, Martin-Luther Universitat, 06099 Halle, Germany ORCID ID:E-mail: isabell.hensen@botanik.uni-halle.de
  • Aouissat, Centre Universitaire Salhi Ahmed Naama, BP 66, Naâma, Algérie ORCID ID:E-mail: aouissatm@yahoo.fr
article id 1510, category Research article
Tähti Pohjanmies, Sakina Elshibli, Pertti Pulkkinen, Mari Rusanen, Pekka Vakkari, Helena Korpelainen, Tomas Roslin. (2016). Fragmentation-related patterns of genetic differentiation in pedunculate oak (Quercus robur) at two hierarchical scales. Silva Fennica vol. 50 no. 2 article id 1510. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1510
Highlights: While long-lived, widespread tree species should be resistant to genetic impoverishment, we detected high differentiation among populations and pronounced genetic structure within populations of Quercus robur in Finland; These patterns seem indicative of population processes active at range margins, and of disequilibrium following historic habitat change; Preservation of remaining genetic variation is thus important in the conservation of Q. robur.

Populations at species’ range margins are expected to show lower genetic diversity than populations at the core of the range. Yet, long-lived, widespread tree species are expected to be resistant to genetic impoverishment, thus showing comparatively high genetic diversity within populations and low differentiation among populations. Here, we study the distribution of genetic variation in the pedunculate oak (Quercus robur L.) at its range margin in Finland at two hierarchical scales using 15 microsatellite loci. At a regional scale, we compared variation within versus among three oak populations. At a landscape scale, we examined genetic structuring within one of these populations, growing on an island of ca 5 km2. As expected, we found the majority of genetic variation in Q. robur to occur within populations. Nonetheless, differentiation among populations was markedly high (FST = 0.12) compared with values reported for populations of Q. robur closer to the core of its range. At the landscape level, some spatial and temporal sub-structuring was observed, likely explained by the history of land-use on the island. Overall, Q. robur fulfils the expectation of the central-marginal hypothesis of high differentiation among marginal populations, but the notable population differentiation has most likely been influenced also by the long, ongoing fragmentation of populations. Finnish oak populations may still be adjusting to the drastic habitat changes of the past centuries. Preservation of genetic variation within the remaining stands is thus an important factor in the conservation of Q. robur at its range margin.

  • Pohjanmies, University of Helsinki, Department of Agricultural Sciences, Spatial Foodweb Ecology Group, P.O. Box 27, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland; University of Jyväskylä, Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 University of Jyväskylä, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: tahti.t.pohjanmies@jyu.fi (email)
  • Elshibli, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Green technology, P.O. Box 18, FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland; University of Helsinki, Department of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 27, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: sakina.elshibli@helsinki.fi
  • Pulkkinen, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Green technology, Haapastensyrjäntie 34, FI-12600 Läyliäinen, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: pertti.pulkkinen@luke.fi
  • Rusanen, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Green technology, P.O. Box 18, FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: mari.rusanen@luke.fi
  • Vakkari, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Green technology, P.O. Box 18, FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: pekka.vakkari@luke.fi
  • Korpelainen, University of Helsinki, Department of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 27, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: helena.korpelainen@helsinki.fi
  • Roslin, University of Helsinki, Department of Agricultural Sciences, Spatial Foodweb Ecology Group, P.O. Box 27, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland; Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Ecology, P.O. Box 7044, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: tomas.roslin@helsinki.fi
article id 1236, category Research article
Monika Litkowiec, Beata P. Plitta-Michalak, Andrzej Lewandowski, Grzegorz Iszkuło. (2015). Homogenous genetic structure in populations of Taxus baccata with varied proportions of male and female individuals. Silva Fennica vol. 49 no. 4 article id 1236. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1236
Highlights: Polish populations of Taxus baccata showed a high level of genetic diversity within populations and moderate genetic differentiation between them after nSSR marker testing; No significant differences in the genetic variation between T. baccata male and female individuals were observed, and microsatellite loci neutrality was verified; Determining the sex ratio in T. baccata populations is not essential to develop a clear understanding of genetic differentiation and diversity within and between populations of this species.

English yew (Taxus baccata L.) is a strictly outcrossing and dioecious species whose populations are small and isolated. It is known that sex ratios may vary in natural populations due to local environmental conditions or stochastic events. However, unbalanced sex ratios may have negative impacts on genetic diversity through enhanced genetic drift and inbreeding. The present study represents one of the first attempts to compare the genetic variation at microsatellite loci within and between populations with different gender proportions. Our results indicated that there were no significant correlations between sex ratio and the extent of genetic variation in different populations. All populations exhibited high levels of genetic diversity. Additionally, the genetic structure was characterized separately in male and female individuals. Statistical analyses of the set estimators describing the genetic structure of male and female individuals of T. baccata revealed no significant differences between the two groups. Molecular analysis verified that microsatellite nuclear loci neutrality developed for T. baccata, as there were no significant differences in the genetic variation between males and females and no evidence for any outlier loci using coalescent and hierarchical Bayesian simulations. The results demonstrate that ignoring biased sex ratios in T. baccata populations had no effect on the assessment of genetic differentiation and genetic diversity within and between populations of this species. These results are discussed with regards to the practical application of molecular markers in conservation programs.

  • Litkowiec, Institute of Dendrology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Parkowa 5, 62-035 Kórnik, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: mlit@man.poznan.pl (email)
  • Plitta-Michalak, Institute of Dendrology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Parkowa 5, 62-035 Kórnik, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: beata-plitta@wp.pl
  • Lewandowski, Institute of Dendrology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Parkowa 5, 62-035 Kórnik, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: alew@man.poznan.pl
  • Iszkuło, Institute of Dendrology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Parkowa 5, 62-035 Kórnik, Poland & University of Zielona Góra, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Prof. Z. Szafrana 1, 65-516 Zielona Góra, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: iszkulo@man.poznan.pl
article id 1073, category Research article
Pedro Sánchez-Gómez, Juan F. Jiménez, Juan B. Vera, Francisco J. Sánchez-Saorín, Juan F. Martínez, Joseph Buhagiar. (2013). Genetic structure of Tetraclinis articulata, an endangered conifer of the western Mediterranean basin. Silva Fennica vol. 47 no. 5 article id 1073. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1073
Highlights: The employment of ISSR molecular markers has shown moderate genetic diversity and high genetic differentiation in Tetraclinis articulata; Genetic structure of populations seems to be influenced by the anthropogenic use of this species since historical times, or alternatively, by the complex palaeogeographic history of the Mediterranean basin; Results could be used to propose management policies for conservation of populations.
Tetraclinis articulata (Vahl) Masters is a tree distributed throughout the western Mediterranean basin. It is included in the IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) red list, and protected by law in several of the countries where it grows. In this study we examined the genetic diversity and genetic structure of 14 populations of T. articulata in its whole geographic range using ISSR (inter simple sequence repeat) markers. T. articulata showed moderate genetic diversity at intrapopulation level and high genetic differentiation. The distribution of genetic diversity among populations did not exhibit a linear pattern related to geographic distances, since all analyses (principal coordinate analysis, Unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean dendrogram and Bayesian structure analysis) revealed that spanish population grouped with Malta and Tunisia populations. Although it is possible that T. articulata earlier was natural in Southeast Spain, results suggest that the current population has been reintroduced into the Iberian Peninsula in historical times, due to its utility in mining and building. In addition, results could be used to propose management guidelines for the conservation of T. articulata.
  • Sánchez-Gómez, Departamento de Biología Vegetal (Botánica), Universidad de Murcia, Campus de Espinardo s/n, E-30100 Murcia, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail: psgomez@um.es
  • Jiménez, Departamento de Biología Vegetal (Botánica), Universidad de Murcia, Campus de Espinardo s/n, E-30100 Murcia, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail: fjimenez@um.es (email)
  • Vera, Departamento de Biología Vegetal (Botánica), Universidad de Murcia, Campus de Espinardo s/n, E-30100 Murcia, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail: jbveraperez@gmail.com
  • Sánchez-Saorín, Dirección General de Medio Ambiente, Consejería de Presidencia de la Región de Murcia, C/ Catedrático Eugenio Úbeda nº3, E-30071 Murcia, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail: fjavier.sanchez3@carm.es
  • Martínez, Dirección General de Medio Ambiente, Consejería de Presidencia de la Región de Murcia, C/ Catedrático Eugenio Úbeda nº3, E-30071 Murcia, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail: juanf.martinez@carm.es
  • Buhagiar, Argotti Herbarium and Gardens (UOM), Triq Vincenzo Bugeja Floriana VLT 16, Malta ORCID ID:E-mail: joseph.buhagiar@um.edu.mt
article id 905, category Research article
Katarzyna A. Jadwiszczak, Danuta Drzymulska, Agata Banaszek, Piotr Jadwiszczak. (2012). Population history, genetic variation and conservation status of the endangered birch species Betula nana L. in Poland. Silva Fennica vol. 46 no. 4 article id 905. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.905
The effective conservation of species requires data on the levels and distribution of genetic diversity within and among populations. In this study, we estimated the genetic variation in three isolated populations of Betula nana in Poland. An analysis of 11 nuclear microsatellites revealed moderate mean heterozygosities (HO=0.556, HE=0.562), low mean number of alleles per locus (A=4.57) and no inbreeding in the total sample. An M-ratio test indicated that each population had experienced a severe bottleneck in the past. Tests for heterozygosity excess revealed that a significant decrease in the numbers of individuals in two populations had occurred quite recently. The large number of private alleles and very restricted number of migrants between populations (Nm=0.35) strongly suggest that genetic drift and geographic isolation are the primary factors responsible for the reduction of genetic variation in the Polish populations of B. nana. We detected two cpDNA haplotypes in the study populations, which can be explained in terms of either the genetic drift acting on the relict localities or a postglacial recolonisation from distinct refugia. Palynological data indicated that one refugium could be located in the Carpathians and their northern foreland. The primary threat to B. nana in Poland is the overgrowth of its habitats by competing species, which has likely resulted in a lack of generative reproduction in the mountain populations.
  • Jadwiszczak, Institute of Biology, University of Białystok, wierkowa 20B, 15-950 Białystok, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: kszalaj@uwb.edu.pl (email)
  • Drzymulska, Institute of Biology, University of Białystok, wierkowa 20B, 15-950 Białystok, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Banaszek, Institute of Biology, University of Białystok, wierkowa 20B, 15-950 Białystok, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Jadwiszczak, Institute of Biology, University of Białystok, wierkowa 20B, 15-950 Białystok, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 229, category Research article
Carmen Martín, Teresa Parra, Margarita Clemente-Muñoz, Esteban Hernández-Bermejo. (2008). Genetic diversity and structure of the endangered Betula pendula subsp. fontqueri populations in the south of Spain. Silva Fennica vol. 42 no. 4 article id 229. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.229
Betula pendula subsp. fontqueri, present in the south of Spain, has been considered in danger of extinction and, for this reason, some regional governments in Spain have included their populations in conservation programmes. In order to establish the genetic structure of the Betula pendula subsp. fontqueri populations, a random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis was carried out. Two B. pubescens populations were included in the study as taxonomic controls. B. pendula subsp. fontqueri populations were clearly differentiated through UPGMA, and showed significant pairwise genetic distance (ΦST) values between all pairs of populations obtained by AMOVA. Genetic diversity found between populations was not correlated to geographical distances. The significant differences among populations must be due to progressive isolation of Betula populations along their paleogeographical history, and more recently to the drastic fragmentation and reduction of some of these populations. The results obtained in this work show clear genetic differences which could be considered in the management of conservation strategies for Betula pendula subsp. fontqueri in its Iberian meridional distribution.
  • Martín, Departamento de Biología Vegetal, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros Agrónomos de Madrid, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040-Madrid, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail: mariacarmen.martin@upm.es (email)
  • Parra, Departamento de Ciencias y Recursos Agrícolas y Forestales, Universidad de Córdoba, Avda. Linneo s/n, 14004-Córdoba, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Clemente-Muñoz, Departamento de Ciencias y Recursos Agrícolas y Forestales, Universidad de Córdoba, Avda. Linneo s/n, 14004-Córdoba, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Hernández-Bermejo, Departamento de Ciencias y Recursos Agrícolas y Forestales, Universidad de Córdoba, Avda. Linneo s/n, 14004-Córdoba, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 314, category Research article
Yuhua Wang, Helena Korpelainen, Chunyang Li. (2006). Microsatellite polymorphism in the edaphic spruce, Picea asperata, originating from the mountains of China. Silva Fennica vol. 40 no. 4 article id 314. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.314
Microsatellite variation of Picea asperata Mast. originating from the mountains of China was investigated by analyzing variation at seven SSR loci in 250 individuals representing ten populations. A fair degree of genetic diversity and considerable population subdivision occurred with the mean gene diversity (H) of 0.707, and genetic distances among populations varying between 0.121 and 0.224 (FST) and between 0.100 and 0.537 (RST). However, inter-population genetic distances showed no correlation with geographic distances between the population sites. This ruled out a simple isolation by distance model and suggested that migration does not have a great impact. In fact, the amount of gene flow, detected using private alleles, was very low, equaling only 0.753. Allele permutation tests revealed that stepwise-like mutations, coupled with genetic drift, could contribute to population differentiation. Moreover, significant genetic differences between populations were detected at most loci. The results indicate that natural selection, presumably through environmental stress, may be one of the main factors causing micro-geographical differentiation in the genetic structure of P. asperata. Based on SSR genotypes, 70% of the 250 individuals were correctly classified into their sites of origin. This suggests that microsatellites (SSRs) are effective in distinguishing genotypes of P. asperata originating from diverse eco-geographical sites in China.
  • Wang, Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 416, Chengdu 610041, China; Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039, China ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Korpelainen, Department of Applied Biology, P.O. Box 27, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Li, Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 416, Chengdu 610041, China ORCID ID:E-mail: licy@cib.ac.cn (email)
article id 476, category Research article
Ignazio Monteleone, Diana Ferrazzini, Piero Belletti. (2006). Effectiveness of neutral RAPD markers to detect genetic divergence between the subspecies uncinata and mugo of Pinus mugo Turra. Silva Fennica vol. 40 no. 3 article id 476. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.476
Fifteen populations of Pinus mugo subsp. mugo (shrub) and Pinus mugo subsp. uncinata (erect), located in the Alps, were investigated through genetic variation scored at 64 polymorphic RAPD loci. In addition, morphological traits of the female cones were analysed. According to AMOVA most of the genetic variation was found within populations (83.39%), and only 1.25% of it between subspecies. Populations differed in terms of their internal genetic variation, with Nei’s gene diversity ranging from 0.227 to 0.397. Morphological data showed differences between subspecies, although none of the populations showed full accordance with expectations. Significant correlation was found between matrices for geographical and morphological distances, while genetic distances were not correlated with any other aspect. The efficacy of morphological and RAPD markers in discriminating between subspecies, and the contribution of the results in relation to the preservation of biodiversity, are discussed.
  • Monteleone, DI.VA.P.R.A., Plant Genetics and Breeding, University of Turin, via Leonardo da Vinci 44, I-10095 Grugliasco, Italy ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Ferrazzini, DI.VA.P.R.A., Plant Genetics and Breeding, University of Turin, via Leonardo da Vinci 44, I-10095 Grugliasco, Italy ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Belletti, DI.VA.P.R.A., Plant Genetics and Breeding, University of Turin, via Leonardo da Vinci 44, I-10095 Grugliasco, Italy ORCID ID:E-mail: piero.belletti@unito.it (email)
article id 689, category Research article
Erik W. Andersson, Kostas A. Spanos, Timothy J. Mullin, Dag Lindgren. (1998). Phenotypic selection compared to restricted combined index selection for many generations. Silva Fennica vol. 32 no. 2 article id 689. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.689
A breeding population has been subjected to repeated selection and crossing by simulation. Unrestricted phenotypic selection and restricted combined index selection were compared at the same effective number for five generations. Results show that phenotypic selection often achieves the gain and diversity possible to achieve by combined index selection but the relative efficiency is different for different family sizes and heritabilities. When phenotypic selection was compared with restricted combined index method at low heritabilities, both methods performed almost equally in terms of gain at the same effective number in small family sizes, although in large families, phenotypic selection was less efficient. At high heritabilities phenotypic selection was as efficient as combined index selection. Phenotypic selection was more efficient in conserving additive variance than combined index selection over five generations compared at the same gain and effective number. The introduction of a dominance component to the total variance had little effect. An increased breeding population size by a factor of ten resulted in an increased additive gain by app. 15%. The conclusion is that even though combined index selection is superior in identifying and extracting the potential for breeding achievements, it is generally not performing better than mass selection when compared at the same effective population size in small families.
  • Andersson, Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, S-901 83, Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: erik.andersson@genfys.slu.se (email)
  • Spanos, N.AG.RE.F.-Forest Research Institute, 57006 Vassilika, Thessaloniki, Greece ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Mullin, Genesis Forest Science Canada Inc., C.P. 64 Succursale Haute-Ville, Québec, QC G1R 4M8 Canada ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Lindgren, Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, S-901 83, Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:

Category: Research note

article id 1415, category Research note
Zorica Šarac, Tanja Dodoš, Nemanja Rajčević, Srdjan Bojović, Petar Marin, Jelena Aleksić. (2015). Genetic patterns in Pinus nigra from the central Balkans inferred from plastid and mitochondrial data. Silva Fennica vol. 49 no. 5 article id 1415. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1415
Highlights: Seven populations of Pinus nigra from the central Balkans, representing four infraspecific taxa, were analyzed with chloroplast microsatellites and a mitochondrial locus; Molecular data failed to support infraspecific circumscriptions; Levels of genetic diversities/differentiation at both genomes were in the range of those reported in western Mediterranean populations of P. nigra; Iberian/African and Balkans’ populations share one mtDNA polymorphism and differ in three mutations.

Pinus nigra J.F. Arnold, European black pine, is a typical component of Mediterranean and sub-Mediterranean coniferous forests with highly fragmentary distribution. Western Mediterranean populations of this species have been studied genetically to date, while eastern populations from the central Balkans, which are larger and more abundant, are still genetically understudied. We analyzed seven populations of P. nigra representing all infraspecific taxa recognized within the central Balkans (subspecies nigra with varieties nigra and gocensis Đorđević; and subspecies pallasiana (Lamb.) Holmboe with varieties pallasiana and banatica (Endl.) Georgescu et Ionescu), with three chloroplast microsatellites (cpDNA SSRs) and one mitochondrial (mtDNA) locus. Although our molecular data failed to support circumscription of studied infraspecific taxa, we found that genetic patterns at both genomes are in accordance with those found previously in westward populations of this species, that is – exceptionally high levels of genetic diversity (HT = 0.949) and low genetic differentiation (GST = 0.024) at the cpDNA level, and moderate levels of genetic diversity (HT = 0.357) and genetic differentiation (GST = 0.358) at the mtDNA level. Based on genealogical relations of mtDNA types currently present in Balkans’ and Iberian/African populations, we inferred that the ancestral gene pool of P. nigra already harbored polymorphism at position 328 prior to the divergence to two lineages currently present in westward and eastward parts of the species range distribution. Subsequent occurrence of three mutations, which distinguish these two lineages, suggests their long-term isolation.

  • Šarac, University of Niš, Faculty of Sciences and Mathematics, Department of Biology and Ecology, Višegradska 33, 18000 Niš, Serbia ORCID ID:E-mail: saraczorica@gmail.com (email)
  • Dodoš, University of Belgrade, Faculty of Biology, Institute of Botany and Botanical Garden “Jevremovac”, Studentski trg 16, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia ORCID ID:E-mail: tanjadodos@bio.bg.ac.rs
  • Rajčević, University of Belgrade, Faculty of Biology, Institute of Botany and Botanical Garden “Jevremovac”, Studentski trg 16, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia ORCID ID:E-mail: nemanja@bio.bg.ac.rs
  • Bojović, University of Belgrade, Institute for Biological Research “Siniša Stanković”, Boulevard Despota Stefana 142, 11060 Belgrade, Serbia ORCID ID:E-mail: bojovic@ibiss.bg.ac.rs
  • Marin, University of Belgrade, Faculty of Biology, Institute of Botany and Botanical Garden “Jevremovac”, Studentski trg 16, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia ORCID ID:E-mail: pdmarin@bio.bg.ac.rs
  • Aleksić, University of Belgrade, Institute of Molecular Genetics and Genetic Engineering, Vojvode Stepe 444a, P.O. Box 23, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia ORCID ID:E-mail: aleksic_jelena@yahoo.com.au

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