Current issue: 53(1)

Under compilation: 53(2)

Impact factor 1.683
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Silva Fennica 1926-1997
1990-1997
1980-1989
1970-1979
1960-1969
Acta Forestalia Fennica
1953-1968
1933-1952
1913-1932

Articles containing the keyword 'growth hormones'.

Category: Article

article id 7166, category Article
J. E. Hårdh. (1966). Trials with carbon dioxide, light and growth substances on forest tree plants. Acta Forestalia Fennica vol. 81 no. 1 article id 7166. https://doi.org/10.14214/aff.7166

Growth-promoting effects of enhanced caron dioxide levels upon forest tree seedlings grown in plastic houses was studied in 1964 and 1965 in the Forest Breeding Foundation in Haapastensyrjä near Loppi in Southern Finland. In both years more vigorous height and weight growth, and development of root system was achieved when the CO2 concentration was increased to 0.2% than in the normal conditions (CO2 0.03%). The CO2 concentration was increased by burning propane in the plastic houses. Burning continued for four hours per day either at 8–10 and 14–16 a clock or 6–10 a clock. Growth was not affected by the time of the treatment, and it was equally high in 0.1% and 0.2% concentrations.

Treatment of the seedlings with 100–200 ppm gibberellic acid (GA) increased the height growth of healthy, well-rooted seedlings. Treatment with a concentrated (600 ppm) dosage, as well as treatment with a combination of GA and 1-naphtyl acetic acid (NAA) caused serious defects in grafts of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.). GA treatments did not induce flower formation in pine. Red light during the night seemed to enhance growth of grafts of silver birch (Betula pendula Roth) and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.).

The PDF includes a summary in Finnish.

  • Hårdh, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5129, category Article
Olavi Luukkanen. (1981). Effects of gibberellins GA4 and GA7 on flowering in Scots pine grafts. Silva Fennica vol. 15 no. 4 article id 5129. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15186

Ethanolic sprays of GA4 or GA7 on 9-year old Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) grafts, repeated four times during the shoot elongation period, resulted in a statistically significant increase in female flowering one year after the treatment. Of the two compounds, GA4 seemed to be somewhat more efficient, yielding 47 female strobili/100 shoots vs. 36 and 6 strobili/100 shoots in GA7 and control treatments respectively. The mixture of GA4 and GA7 compounds was also applied and seemed to have an effect intermediary to those of the pure compounds. However, due to the limited amounts of material, none of the differences between the gibberellins could be statistically confirmed. Male flowering frequencies were also too low to allow any firm conclusions, but the numerical results suggested that the purified gibberellins may promote male and female flowering in different ways.

The PDF includes a summary in Finnish.

  • Luukkanen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5070, category Article
Olavi Luukkanen, Stig Johansson. (1980). Flower induction by exogenous plant hormones in Scots pine and Norway spruce grafts. Silva Fennica vol. 14 no. 1 article id 5070. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15011

The aim of the present study was to establish whether hormone treatments would promote flowering in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.) grafts under Finnish conditions. Also, an attempt was made to test the efficiency of hormones as well as the variation in response among different clones. Six Scots pine and six Norway spruce clones were selected in each seed orchard based on their flowering intensity, and treated with growth hormones (GA, NAA) of different dosages by spraying. Flowering was observed one year after the treatments.

None of the treated or untreated spruce grafts flowered. However, poor flowering in the natural stands indicated that the environmental conditions during the previous years did not favour flowering. On the other hand, a distinct increase in flowering in Scots pine was observed as a result of spraying with hormone solutions. Treatments with gibberellin had a distinct promoting effect both on male and female flowering in the Scots pine grafts, although the responses varied between the different hormones or clones. The relative effect was generally stronger in male flowering.

The PDF includes a summary in Finnish.

  • Luukkanen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Johansson, ORCID ID:E-mail:

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