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Articles containing the keyword 'harvester'.

Category: Research article

article id 10178, category Research article
Franz Holzleitner, Magdalena Langmaier, Eduard Hochbichler, Bernhardt Obermayer, Karl Stampfer, Christian Kanzian. (2019). Effect of prior tree marking, thinning method and topping diameter on harvester performance in a first thinning operation – a field experiment. Silva Fennica vol. 53 no. 3 article id 10178. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.10178
Highlights: No effect on harvester performance due to prior tree marking detected; Operator selection versus prior tree marking was assessed; Operator could apply two different thinning methods; Prior tree marking seems to have a positive effect on residual stand damage.

The effect of harvester operator tree selection or prior tree marking in thinning operations on satisfactory results and performance has been widely discussed. In harvester operator tree selection, the machine operator decides on the fly which trees are selected to remain or cut. The objective of the study was to analyze the effect of prior tree marking, thinning method and topping diameter on harvester performance in low-diameter thinning operations. The entire thinning operation was captured using video technology. Overall, 2.36 ha divided into 48 plots with 5202 trees were thinned with an average diameter at breast height (dbh) over bark for all plots of between 12.5 and 14.7 cm. In total, 3122 trees were harvested, resulting in 60% removal of stem number over all plots. The harvester achieved a mean productivity of 7.38 m3 PMH0–1 with 1.48 m3 PMH0–1 SEM, with stem volume having the major influence on harvesting productivity. Prior tree marking, topping and thinning method did not significantly affect productivity. Without prior tree marking by the foresters, harvesting removal was shifted toward lower diameters. Within the unmarked plots, 7.0% of the residual trees were damaged compared with 3.2% in marked plots.

  • Holzleitner, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, Institute of Forest Engineering, Peter-Jordan-Straße 82/3, A-1190 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8489-3050 E-mail: franz.holzleitner@boku.ac.at (email)
  • Langmaier, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, Institute of Silviculture, Peter-Jordan-Straße 82/3, A-1190 Vienna, Austria; Austrian Research Centre for Forests, Department of Forest Growth and Silviculture, Seckendorff Gudent Weg 8, A-1130 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail: magdalena.langmaier@bfw.gv.at
  • Hochbichler, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, Institute of Silviculture, Peter-Jordan-Straße 82/3, A-1190 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail: eduard.hochbichler@boku.ac.at
  • Obermayer, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, Institute of Forest Engineering, Peter-Jordan-Straße 82/3, A-1190 Vienna, Austria; Agricultural Technical School of Pyhra, Kyrnbergstraße 4, A-3143 Pyhra, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail: bernhardt.obermayer@lfs-pyhra.ac.at
  • Stampfer, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, Institute of Forest Engineering, Peter-Jordan-Straße 82/3, A-1190 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-9350-2859 E-mail: karl.stampfer@boku.ac.at
  • Kanzian, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, Institute of Forest Engineering, Peter-Jordan-Straße 82/3, A-1190 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-1198-9788 E-mail: christian.kanzian@boku.ac.at
article id 10075, category Research article
Matti Maltamo, Marius Hauglin, Erik Naesset, Terje Gobakken. (2019). Estimating stand level stem diameter distribution utilizing harvester data and airborne laser scanning. Silva Fennica vol. 53 no. 3 article id 10075. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.10075
Highlights: Tree level-positioned harvester data were successfully used as plot-level training data for k-nearest neighbor stem diameter distribution modelling applying airborne laser scanning information as predictor variables; Stand-level validation showed that merchantable volume of total tree stock could be estimated with RMSE value of about 9%; The fit of the stem diameter distribution assessed by a variant of Reynold’s error index showed values smaller than 0.2; The most accurate results were obtained for the training plot sizes of 200 m2 and 400 m2.

Accurately positioned single-tree data obtained from a cut-to-length harvester were used as training harvester plot data for k-nearest neighbor (k-nn) stem diameter distribution modelling applying airborne laser scanning (ALS) information as predictor variables. Part of the same harvester data were also used for stand-level validation where the validation units were stands including all the harvester plots on a systematic grid located within each individual stand. In the validation all harvester plots within a stand and also the neighboring stands located closer than 200 m were excluded from the training data when predicting for plots of a particular stand. We further compared different training harvester plot sizes, namely 200 m2, 400 m2, 900 m2 and 1600 m2. Due to this setup the number of considered stands and the areas within the stands varied between the different harvester plot sizes. Our data were from final fellings in Akershus County in Norway and consisted of altogether 47 stands dominated by Norway spruce. We also had ALS data from the area. We concentrated on estimating characteristics of Norway spruce but due to the k-nn approach, species-wise estimates and stand totals as a sum over species were considered as well. The results showed that in the most accurate cases stand-level merchantable total volume could be estimated with RMSE values smaller than 9% of the mean. This value can be considered as highly accurate. Also the fit of the stem diameter distribution assessed by a variant of Reynold’s error index showed values smaller than 0.2 which are superior to those found in the previous studies. The differences between harvester plot sizes were generally small, showing most accurate results for the training harvester plot sizes 200 m2 and 400 m2.

  • Maltamo, University of Eastern Finland, School of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu ORCID ID:E-mail: matti.maltamo@uef.fi (email)
  • Hauglin, Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research, Division of Forest and Forest Resources, P.O. Box 115, 1431 Ås, Norway ORCID ID:E-mail: marius.hauglin@nibio.no
  • Naesset, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Faculty of Environmental Sciences and Natural Resource Management, P.O. Box 5003, 1432 Ås, Norway ORCID ID:E-mail: erik.naesset@nmbu.no
  • Gobakken, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Faculty of Environmental Sciences and Natural Resource Management, P.O. Box 5003, 1432 Ås, Norway ORCID ID:E-mail: terje.gobakken@nmbu.no
article id 9947, category Research article
Eric R. Labelle, Linus Huß. (2018). Creation of value through a harvester on-board bucking optimization system operated in a spruce stand. Silva Fennica vol. 52 no. 3 article id 9947. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.9947
Highlights: Use of harvester on-board computer bucking optimization remains highly under-utilized in German forestry; Revenue per tree and harvesting productivity were both statistically higher with automatic bucking as compared to quality bucking during a thinning operation in a spruce dominated stand.

Tree bucking, defined as the process in which a stem is segmented into shorter logs of varying lengths, has a significant effect on the value adding potential of a forest enterprise. Because of its importance in terms of correct product and length combinations, improper bucking can lead to financial losses. In this study, two treatments (OFF: quality bucking performed by the operator while using hot keys and ON: automatic bucking using the optimized suggestions from the harvester on-board computer; OBC) were tested in a Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst.) dominated stand located in Germany. Both treatments had the aim to maximize the value of a stem. The research took place in an 80-year old spruce and beech stand under a regenerative cutting. Fully-mechanized harvesting was performed with an 8-wheel Ponsse Bear single-grip harvester equipped with a H8 harvesting head. Results indicated that the product recovery of the two treatments differed by 4% in undamaged trees (no broken tree-tops or stems) to the benefit of manual bucking. However, the revenue of trees subjected to optimized bucking were up to 4% higher (in average 3%) than those of the manual bucking once expressed on a per cubic meter basis. Moreover, the harvesting productivity of the ON treatment was at the maximum 17% higher compared to the OFF treatment. Based on the results from this case study, the use of an optimization software in Norway spruce dominated stands with the aim to maximize the value of single stems showed promising results.

  • Labelle, Assistant Professorship of Forest Operations, Department of Ecology and Ecosystem Management, Technical University of Munich, Hans-Carl-von-Carlowitz-Platz 2, D-85354 Freising, Germany ORCID ID:E-mail: eric.labelle@tum.de (email)
  • Huß, Assistant Professorship of Forest Operations, Department of Ecology and Ecosystem Management, Technical University of Munich, Hans-Carl-von-Carlowitz-Platz 2, D-85354 Freising, Germany ORCID ID:E-mail: linus.huss@gmx.de
article id 1428, category Research article
Gernot Erber, Franz Holzleitner, Maximilian Kastner, Karl Stampfer. (2016). Effect of multi-tree handling and tree-size on harvester performance in small-diameter hardwood thinnings. Silva Fennica vol. 50 no. 1 article id 1428. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1428
Highlights: Harvesting with the accumulating energy wood head EF28 was studied under small tree dimension (8 dm3) in hardwood thinnings; Reasonable productivity was achieved; Maximum achieved cutting diameter in hornbeam stand was 23 cm and 15% lower than in softwood stands; Head has potential under such conditions.

Early thinnings are laborious and costly. Thus forest companies are searching for cost and time efficient ways to carry out this task. The study’s purpose was to determine the productivity of the EF28 accumulating energy wood harvesting head in harvesting small-diameter hornbeam (Carpinus betulus L.) undergrowth trees and evaluate the effect of its multi-tree handling (MTH) capacity on time consumption. The harvester was a wheeled, three-axle Komatsu 911. A time study of 7.1 hours on 19 plots, with a total area of 0.76 ha was conducted. On average, the harvested tree volume was 8 dm³ and the stand density was 2666 trees/ha. The productivity was modelled with MTH conduction, mean diameter at breast height and the number of trees handled per cycle as independent variables. On average, MTH took 27% longer per cycle, increased extracted volume per cycle by 33% and consequently increased productivity with 5.0%. In 71.9% of the cycles more than one tree was handled and if so, dimensions were smaller than in single-tree handling (5.8 cm vs. 12.0 cm). Maximum felling diameter of 23 cm was about 15% smaller than in softwood (according to the manufacturer’s specifications) and the driver didn’t exploit the EF28’s theoretical potential in terms of trees handled per cycle. It can be concluded that the head could significantly improve productivity in small-diameter wood procurement.

  • Erber, Addresses University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, Institute of Forest Engineering, Peter-Jordan Straße 82/3, A-1190 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail: gernot.erber@boku.ac.at (email)
  • Holzleitner, Addresses University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, Institute of Forest Engineering, Peter-Jordan Straße 82/3, A-1190 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail: franz.holzleitner@boku.ac.at
  • Kastner, Addresses University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, Institute of Forest Engineering, Peter-Jordan Straße 82/3, A-1190 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail: maximilian.kastner@boku.ac.at
  • Stampfer, Addresses University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, Institute of Forest Engineering, Peter-Jordan Straße 82/3, A-1190 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail: karl.stampfer@boku.ac.at
article id 1159, category Research article
Grzegorz Szewczyk, Janusz Michał Sowa, Włodzimierz Grzebieniowski, Mariusz Kormanek, Dariusz Kulak, Arkadiusz Stańczykiewicz. (2014). Sequencing of harvester work during standard cuttings and in areas with windbreaks. Silva Fennica vol. 48 no. 4 article id 1159. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1159
Highlights: In standard cutting stands and thinning areas with windbreaks there occurred three-activity operational cycles. In mature stands with windbreaks the occurrence of stable sequences supplemented with five-activity cycles was noted. Consequently, the operational time in post-disaster thinning stands should be increased by 55% whereas in mature stands it should be 30% longer in comparison with standard stands.
The aim of the study was to characterize repetitive cycles of harvester operation. The study was conducted in thinning, mature and post-disaster pine stands. The sequences of the activities characteristic of harvester operation were described as time series. In order to detect the cyclic variable structure of the analysed time series, the methodology of the single spectrum Fourier analysis was applied. In standard stands, post-disaster late-thinning stands and mature stands, the existence of stable operational cycles with the length of three activities was discovered while in post-disaster mature stands additional five-activity operational phases were noted. Described in this way, the lengths of the operational cycles of harvesters working in post-disaster areas were higher by about 55% and 30% respectively, as compared to standard thinning and mature stands.
  • Szewczyk, University of Agriculture in Krakow, Faculty of Forestry, Institute of Forest Utilization and Forest Technology, Department of Forest and Wood Utilization, Al. 29-Listopada 46, 31-425 Krakow, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: rlszewcz@cyf-kr.edu.pl (email)
  • Sowa, University of Agriculture in Krakow, Faculty of Forestry, Institute of Forest Utilization and Forest Technology, Department of Forest and Wood Utilization, Al. 29-Listopada 46, 31-425 Krakow, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: rlsowa@cyf-kr.edu.pl
  • Grzebieniowski, University of Agriculture in Krakow, Faculty of Forestry, Institute of Forest Utilization and Forest Technology, Department of Forest and Wood Utilization, Al. 29-Listopada 46, 31-425 Krakow, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: wrzoswj@interia.pl
  • Kormanek, University of Agriculture in Krakow, Faculty of Forestry, Institute of Forest Utilization and Forest Technology, Department of Forest Work Mechanisation, Al. 29-Listopada 46, 31-425 Krakow, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: rlkorma@cyf-kr.edu.pl
  • Kulak, University of Agriculture in Krakow, Faculty of Forestry, Institute of Forest Utilization and Forest Technology, Department of Forest and Wood Utilization, Al. 29-Listopada 46, 31-425 Krakow, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: rlkulak@cyf-kr.edu.pl
  • Stańczykiewicz, University of Agriculture in Krakow, Faculty of Forestry, Institute of Forest Utilization and Forest Technology, Department of Forest and Wood Utilization, Al. 29-Listopada 46, 31-425 Krakow, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: rlstancz@cyf-kr.edu.pl
article id 165, category Research article
Yrjö Nuutinen, Kari Väätäinen, Antti Asikainen, Robert Prinz, Jaakko Heinonen. (2010). Operational efficiency and damage to sawlogs by feed rollers of the harvester head. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 1 article id 165. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.165
In mechanical cutting, deep damage caused by feed rollers can reduce the yield of good quality timber for the sawmill and plywood industries. Additionally the feeding and energy efficiency of feed rollers are important for the profitability of harvester cutting. The objectives of this study were to compare the damages to sawlogs, as well as the time and fuel consumption of stem feeding with six different steel feed rollers during the processing of stems using a single grip harvester. This study tested two rollers with big spikes, two rollers with small spikes, one roller with studs in v-angle and one roller with adaptable steel plates in the ring of the roller. A highly detailed, and accurate processing and fuel consumption projection was recorded using the harvester’s automated data collector on a log and stem level. The roller adaptable plate averaged, for unbarked sawlogs, the lowest damages of 3.7 mm. While the damages of the roller with big spikes were the deepest with an average of 7.8 mm. For medium stems, volume of 0.35 m3, the range of differences between the maximum and minimum effective feeding time per roller was 6–19%, which would increase the effective time consumption of cutting by 1–3%. Corresponding differences in fuel consumption during total stem processing were in the range of 7–15%. According to this study it can be concluded that the traditional rollers with spikes were most effective in processing and fuel consumption, but at the same time they caused the deepest damages to the sawlogs. The roller type with adaptable steel plates was the most effective for small stems, additionally it also caused the least damage to the sawlogs.
  • Nuutinen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu Research Unit, P.O. Box 68, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: yrjo.nuutinen@metla.fi (email)
  • Väätäinen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu Research Unit, P.O. Box 68, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Asikainen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu Research Unit, P.O. Box 68, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Prinz, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu Research Unit, P.O. Box 68, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Heinonen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu Research Unit, P.O. Box 68, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 346, category Research article
Tuomo Nurminen, Heikki Korpunen, Jori Uusitalo. (2006). Time consumption analysis of the mechanized cut-to-length harvesting system. Silva Fennica vol. 40 no. 2 article id 346. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.346
The time consumption and productivity of harvesting are dependent on stand conditions, the operators’ skills, working techniques and the characteristics of the forestry machinery. Even if the basic methods and machine types of the cut-to-length harvesting system have not changed significantly in 10 to 15 years, improvements in the operators’ competence, technical solutions in forest machinery and changes in the working environment have undoubtedly taken place. In this study, the objective was to discover the special characteristics in the time consumption of mechanized cutting and forest haulage in Finnish conditions. The empirical time study was conducted with professional operators and medium-sized single-grip harvesters and forwarders in final fellings and thinnings in easy terrain in central Finland. The models for effective time consumption in the work phases and total productivity were formed. Stem size, tree species and bucking affected the cutting, whereas timber density on the strip road, the average driving distance, load capacity, wood assortment and the bunching result of the harvester operator had an effect on the forest haulage performance. The results may be used in simulations, cost calculations and education.
  • Nurminen, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forestry, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: tuomo.nurminen@joensuu.fi (email)
  • Korpunen, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forestry, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Uusitalo, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Parkano Research Unit, Kaironiementie 54, FI-39700 Parkano, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 398, category Research article
Heikki Ovaskainen. (2005). Comparison of harvester work in forest and simulator environments. Silva Fennica vol. 39 no. 1 article id 398. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.398
Harvester simulators offer a safe and cost-saving method for studying the basics of harvester controls and working technique. Therefore, harvester simulators are increasingly being used in the education of harvester operators. In this study, the objective was to compare harvester work in real and simulator environments, and to determine how a professional harvester operator’s working technique may have changed in the simulator environment. Specific features of the simulator that encumbered operators’ normal work are also presented; and the correspondence of the simulator to reality is evaluated. The work of six professional harvester operators was studied in thinning and in clear cutting stands in both environments: first in the real forest and thereafter on the simulator. The results indicate that the operators’ working technique on the simulator was mainly the same as in the real forest. This means that the same restrictions are valid on the simulator as in the forest. The basic principles of harvesting must be known so that high productivity and good quality can be obtained. However, certain simulator-specific features encumbered the work of harvester operators. Limited visibility to the side increased the need to reverse and the 3D-visualization caused failed catches. Improvements in software would remove some of the defects, e.g. failed felling and cheating in the felling phase. These results also indicate that simulators can be used for research purposes.
  • Ovaskainen, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forestry, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: heikki.ovaskainen@joensuu.fi (email)
article id 398, category Research article
Heikki Ovaskainen. (2005). Comparison of harvester work in forest and simulator environments. Silva Fennica vol. 39 no. 1 article id 398. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.398
Harvester simulators offer a safe and cost-saving method for studying the basics of harvester controls and working technique. Therefore, harvester simulators are increasingly being used in the education of harvester operators. In this study, the objective was to compare harvester work in real and simulator environments, and to determine how a professional harvester operator’s working technique may have changed in the simulator environment. Specific features of the simulator that encumbered operators’ normal work are also presented; and the correspondence of the simulator to reality is evaluated. The work of six professional harvester operators was studied in thinning and in clear cutting stands in both environments: first in the real forest and thereafter on the simulator. The results indicate that the operators’ working technique on the simulator was mainly the same as in the real forest. This means that the same restrictions are valid on the simulator as in the forest. The basic principles of harvesting must be known so that high productivity and good quality can be obtained. However, certain simulator-specific features encumbered the work of harvester operators. Limited visibility to the side increased the need to reverse and the 3D-visualization caused failed catches. Improvements in software would remove some of the defects, e.g. failed felling and cheating in the felling phase. These results also indicate that simulators can be used for research purposes.
  • Ovaskainen, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forestry, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: heikki.ovaskainen@joensuu.fi (email)
article id 428, category Research article
Jonny Andersson, Lars Eliasson. (2004). Effects of three harvesting work methods on Harwarder productivity in final felling. Silva Fennica vol. 38 no. 2 article id 428. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.428
During the last ten years interest in the harwarder has increased, however, studies have concentrated on effects of technical improvements on machine productivity. It has been noted that there is a large potential to increase the productivity through development of suitable work methods. To find efficient work patterns for a harwarder with a turnable loading area, three different harvesting methods were studied in final felling. Three work methods were used. Method 1: the harwarder drove backwards into the stand making a strip road, strip road trees were felled and left on the ground, on the way out of the stand the harwarder cut and processed the trees on both sides of the machine directly into the loading area. Method 2: the harwarder drove forward along the edge of the cut, cutting and processing trees directly into the loading area. Method 3: the harwarder drove forward into the stand and cut and processed strip road trees and trees standing on both sides of the machine directly into the loading area. The most efficient work method was method 2 where the productivity was 13.0 m3 u.b. per E0h (cubic metre under bark per effective hour). The productivities for method 1 and 3 were 12.1 and 11.9 m3 u.b. per E0h, respectively. In addition to work method harwarder productivity was shown to be dependent on load volume, average tree size and hauling distance. The only work elements significantly affected by work methods were processing and movement during processing. The operator had only a few weeks to get used to the machine and even less time to practise on the work methods. Thus, it is probable that the productivity for the studied methods will increase with increasing work experience. Furthermore, as only three work methods were studied, there are still untested work methods. The potential to further improve harwarder work methods is considerable.
  • Andersson, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Silviculture, S-901 83 Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Eliasson, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Silviculture, S-901 83 Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: lars.eliasson@ssko.slu.se (email)

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