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Articles containing the keyword 'impedance'.

Category: Research article

article id 1341, category Research article
Přemysl Humplík, Petr Čermák, Tomáš Žid. (2016). Electrical impedance tomography for decay diagnostics of Norway spruce (Picea abies): possibilities and opportunities. Silva Fennica vol. 50 no. 1 article id 1341. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1341
Highlights: Statistical parameters of EIT datasets with values of electrical resistance of heartwood are possible to employ in refining heartwood rot diagnostics; Sapwood proportion is decreasing as the proportion of decay on the radial cut expands; Using EIT datasets and sapwood proportion, trees with rot can be split into two groups as per proportion of decay: [< 35%] and [> 35%].

The paper aimed at testing the potential of refining tree rot diagnostics carried out by means of electrical impedance tomography (EIT). Examined was the use of EIT datasets with electrical resistance values and sapwood proportion determined on the basis of tomograms. Making use of datasets with resistance values in EIT rot diagnostics is not a default method, although datasets stay unaffected by a fixed colour scale and subsequent subjective evaluation unlike tomograms. Tomography measurement was carried out for 27 individuals of Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst.) in two stands north-east of Brno, Czech Republic. Once felled down, radial cut-outs were sampled at the measurement site and used for localising rot and determining the extent of the area of decay. The results were subsequently compared with tomograms. EIT datasets containing values of electrical resistance found by measuring were statistically processed and compared with the extent of rot area identified within the cuts. Sapwood proportion values were also detected using the tomograms. The baseline assumption that sapwood proportion decreases as the rot area in the radial cut expands was confirmed. In trees with rot percentage to 35% approximately, sapwood proportion was exceeding 30% except one tree. In trees with rot percentage exceeding 35%, sapwood proportion was below 30%. On the basis of interpreted datasets, the trees can be split into three characteristic groups that correspond to the occurrence, extent and nature of the rot.

  • Humplík, Mendel University in Brno, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Technology, Zemědělská 1665/3, 613 00 Brno, Czech Republic ORCID ID:E-mail: premysl.humplik@mendelu.cz (email)
  • Čermák, Mendel University in Brno, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Technology, Zemědělská 1665/3, 613 00 Brno, Czech Republic ORCID ID:E-mail: petr.cermak@mendelu.cz
  • Žid, Mendel University in Brno, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Technology, Zemědělská 1665/3, 613 00 Brno, Czech Republic ORCID ID:E-mail: tomas.zid@mendelu.cz
article id 328, category Research article
Pedro J. Aphalo, Markku Lahti, Tarja Lehto, Tapani Repo, Aino Rummukainen, Hannu Mannerkoski, Leena Finér. (2006). Responses of silver birch saplings to low soil temperature. Silva Fennica vol. 40 no. 3 article id 328. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.328
Two-year-old silver birch (Betula pendula) saplings were grown for a third growing season in controlled-environment rooms (dasotrons) at three soil temperatures (5, 10, and 20 °C). All trees grew the first flush of leaves, but the growth of the second flush was almost completely inhibited at the two lower temperatures. The dry weight of the second-flush leaves was 50 times larger at 20 °C than at 5 and 10 °C, with about 100 times more nitrogen. Root growth was less affected than shoot growth. Chlorophyll content, net assimilation rate and stomatal conductance were lower at low soil temperatures. The value of the cytoplasm resistance estimated from the electric impedance spectra was lower at 5 °C than at 10 or 20 °C. Leaf water potential was highest at the lowest soil temperature, and intercellular carbon dioxide concentration was only slightly lower in saplings growing in cooler soil. We conclude that the effect of long-term exposure to cold soil on net assimilation and growth was not caused by stomatal closure alone. It is likely to be additionally mediated by the limited nitrogen acquisition at the low soil temperatures, and perhaps additionally by some other factor. As the growth depression of aboveground parts in response to low soil temperature was more significant in silver birch than what has earlier been found in conifers, the relative changes in air and soil temperature may eventually determine whether birch will become more dominant in boreal forests with climate change.
  • Aphalo, University of Helsinki, Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Lahti, The Finnish Forest Research Institute ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Lehto, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forestry, Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: tarja.lehto@joensuu.fi (email)
  • Repo, The Finnish Forest Research Institute ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Rummukainen, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forestry, Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Mannerkoski, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forestry, Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Finér, The Finnish Forest Research Institute ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 380, category Research article
Tapani Repo, Janne Laukkanen, Raimo Silvennoinen. (2005). Measurement of the tree root growth using electrical impedance spectroscopy. Silva Fennica vol. 39 no. 2 article id 380. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.380
The non-destructive evaluation of plant root growth is a challenge in root research. In the present study we aimed to develop electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) for that purpose. Willows (Salix myrsinifolia Salisb.) were grown from cuttings in a hydroponic culture in a growth chamber. Root growth was monitored at regular intervals by a displacement method and compared with the EIS parameters of the plants. To measure its impedance spectrum (IS) (frequency range from 40 Hz to 340 kHz) each plant was set in a measuring cell filled with a solution of the hydroponic culture. The IS was measured using a two-electrode measuring system. A silver needle electrode was connected to the stem immediately above the immersion level and a platinum wire was placed in the solution. The measurements were repeated twice weekly for a root growth period of one month. The IS of the entity consisting of a piece of stem, roots and culture solution were modelled by means of an electric circuit consisting of two ZARC-Cole elements, one constant-phase element, and a resistor. On the plant basis, an increase in root volume by growth correlated with a reduction in the sum of resistances in the ZARC-Cole elements (mean Pearson’s correlation coefficient r = –0.70).
  • Repo, The Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu Research Centre, P.O. Box 68, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: tapani.repo@metla.fi (email)
  • Laukkanen, University of Joensuu, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Silvennoinen, University of Joensuu, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:

Category: Article

article id 5437, category Article
Tapani Repo. (1991). Rehardening potential of Scots pine seedlings during dehardening. Silva Fennica vol. 25 no. 1 article id 5437. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15591

The ability of one-year old Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) seedlings to reharden during the dehardening period was studied. Naturally hardened quiescent seedlings were preconditioned at 0°C for ten days and then placed in chambers at different forcing temperatures with different light regimes. The forcing periods were followed by cool periods. Changes in frost hardiness were monitored at intervals using freeze tests of whole plants. Frost hardiness was assessed by three methods: impedance, survival and growth retardation. Dehardening seemed to be a partially reversible process, i.e. in some growing conditions slight rehardening was found.

The PDF includes an abstract in Finnish.

  • Repo, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5369, category Article
Helen J. Jozefek. (1989). The effect of varying levels of potassium on the frost resistance of birch seedlings. Silva Fennica vol. 23 no. 1 article id 5369. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15528

Seven hundred one-year-old Betula pendula Roth seedlings were given different concentrations of potassium fertilizer. Over the study period seedlings were subjected to artificial growing and dormant phases. Frost resistance of the seedlings was assessed by artificial freezing tests and electrical impedance measurements on stem cuttings. In general, high concentrations of potassium fertilizer reflected a low tolerance to frost. Pre-freezing impedance readings decreased with increasing potassium fertilizer dosages. Results from pre-freezing impedance measurements were found to be in broad agreement with the hypothesis that high impedance readings indicate a frost hardy tissue whereas low readings imply the opposite.

The PDF includes an abstract in Finnish.

  • Jozefek, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5351, category Article
Tapani Repo. (1988). Physical and physiological aspects of impedance measurements in plants. Silva Fennica vol. 22 no. 3 article id 5351. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15508

Electrical impedance characteristics of plant cells are dependent on such physiological factors as physiological condition, developmental stage, cell structure, nutrient status, water balance and temperature acclimation. In the measurements also such technical and physical factors as type of electrodes, frequency, geometry of the object, inter-electrode distance and temperature have an effect. These factors are discussed especially with respect to the impedance method in frost resistance studies of plants.

The PDF includes an abstract in Finnish.

  • Repo, ORCID ID:E-mail:

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