Current issue: 53(3)

Under compilation: 53(4)

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Silva Fennica 1926-1997
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Acta Forestalia Fennica
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Articles containing the keyword 'natural forests'.

Category: Research article

article id 10002, category Research article
Bayasaa Tumenjargal, Futoshi Ishiguri, Haruna Aiso-Sanada, Yusuke Takahashi, Bayartsetseg Baasan, Ganbaatar Chultem, Jyunichi Ohshima, Shinso Yokota. (2018). Geographic variations of wood properties of Larix sibirica naturally grown in Mongolia. Silva Fennica vol. 52 no. 4 article id 10002. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.10002
Highlights: Significant differences (p  < 0.01) among five stands were found in tree height, stress-wave velocity of stems, dynamic Young’s modulus of stems and logs, annual ring width, and latewood percentage, suggesting that there was geographic variation of mechanical properties of wood in Larix sibirica (Münchh.) Ledeb. grown in Mongolia; Dynamic Young’s modulus of logs in L. sibirica trees can be predicted by stress-wave velocity of stems; Stem diameter of L. sibirica naturally grown in Mongolia is closely related to radial growth at initial stage of growth, especially within the first twenty years.

Geographic variations in growth, stress-wave velocity of stem, dynamic Young’s modulus of stems and logs, annual ring width, latewood percentage and basic density were investigated for Larix sibirica (Münchh.) Ledeb. naturally grown in Mongolia. A total of 250 trees with 20 to 30 cm in stem diameter at a height of 1.3 m above ground level were selected from each natural stand in five different provenances in Mongolia. In addition, five trees in each stand were cut for measuring dynamic Young’s modulus of stems and logs, annual ring width, latewood percentage and basic density. Mean values of stress-wave velocity of stems in each stand ranged from 2.92 to 3.41 km s–1, and the mean value of five stands was 3.23 km s–1. Mean values of dynamic Young’s modulus of logs in each stand ranged from 5.17 to 9.72 GPa. A significant correlation (r = 0.798, p < 0.01) was found between stress-wave velocity of stems and dynamic Young’s modulus of logs. Among the five stands, the highest and the lowest values of average annual ring number were 193 and 44, respectively. Mean values of basic density in five trees within each stand were examined and ranged from 0.52 to 0.56 g cm–3. Significant differences among five stands were found in tree height, stress-wave velocity of stem, dynamic Young’s modulus of stems and logs, annual ring width and latewood percentage, suggesting that L. sibirica trees naturally grown in Mongolia have geographic variations in mechanical properties of wood.

  • Tumenjargal, Faculty of Agriculture, Utsunomiya University, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8505, Japan; United Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8509, Japan; Research and Training Institute of Forestry and Wood Industry, Mongolian University Science and Technology, Ulaanbaatar 14191, Mongolia ORCID ID:E-mail: t_bayasaa88@yahoo.com
  • Ishiguri, Faculty of Agriculture, Utsunomiya University, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8505, Japan ORCID ID:E-mail: ishiguri@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp (email)
  • Aiso-Sanada, Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8687, Japan ORCID ID:E-mail: haiso@ffpri.affrc.go.jp
  • Takahashi, Faculty of Agriculture, Utsunomiya University, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8505, Japan ORCID ID:E-mail: zo.r.by0814@gmail.com
  • Baasan, Research and Training Institute of Forestry and Wood Industry, Mongolian University Science and Technology, Ulaanbaatar 14191, Mongolia ORCID ID:E-mail: bayartsetseg@must.edu.mn
  • Chultem, Research and Training Institute of Forestry and Wood Industry, Mongolian University Science and Technology, Ulaanbaatar 14191, Mongolia ORCID ID:E-mail: t_bayasaa88@yahoo.com
  • Ohshima, Faculty of Agriculture, Utsunomiya University, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8505, Japan ORCID ID:E-mail: joshima@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp
  • Yokota, Faculty of Agriculture, Utsunomiya University, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8505, Japan ORCID ID:E-mail: yokotas@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp

Category: Discussion article

article id 270, category Discussion article
Seppo Rouvinen, Jari Kouki. (2008). The natural northern European boreal forests: unifying the concepts, terminologies, and their application. Silva Fennica vol. 42 no. 1 article id 270. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.270
Recent emphasis on conserving the biodiversity has stressed the value of natural ecosystems in saving the species from extinction. In the Fennoscandian region the conifer-dominated boreal forests form the largest single ecosystem. The forests have been under varying intensity of human influence for decades or centuries. Recent attempts have tried to seek the last remaining natural forests to be included in the protection programmes. However, due to long and widespread human influence, finding and defining the natural forests has proven to be extremely difficult, not only because they are so rare but also because the concept of natural forest is vague. These difficulties are partly seen through the diverse terminology used. We first review the varying terminology as seen in recent studies. Secondly, we propose the basis for defining the natural forest and show some intriguing and challenging difficulties are involved in the concept. These difficulties are at least partly related to inherent strong and long-term dynamic component in boreal forest ecosystems that is manifested over several temporal and spatial scales. Finally, we outline a more general terminology with associated indicators and measurements that might be used in the classification and terminology. Conceptual clarification is necessary, for example, to compile ecologically justified and representative global, national and regional forest statistics. Many currently applied definitions of “forest” and “natural” that are applied in the context of forest statistics overlook ecologically important components of natural forests, and thus provide quite misleading or inadequate data of existing diversity patterns in these ecosystems.
  • Rouvinen, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kouki, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: jari.kouki@joensuu.fi (email)

Category: Article

article id 4982, category Article
Olli Järvinen, Kullervo Kuusela, Risto A. Väisänen. (1977). Metsien rakenteen muutoksen vaikutus pesimälinnustoomme viimeisten 30 vuoden aikana. Silva Fennica vol. 11 no. 4 article id 4982. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a14836
English title: Effects of modern forestry on the numbers of breeding birds in Finland.

Pair numbers of breeding land birds were estimated from line transects data collected in Finland in 1936–76. The changes observed in the bird populations are in this paper compared with data obtained in the Finnish forest inventories, particularly made in 1951–53 and 1971–76. It is concluded that modern forestry has considerable impact on the breeding bird fauna. In general, more species have increased than decreased due to changes in the forests. Areas affected by forestry are more favourable habitats for many species than natural forests, but, on the other hand, there are certain species which are greatly harmed by the effects of modern forestry.

The PDF includes a summary in English.

  • Järvinen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kuusela, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Väisänen, ORCID ID:E-mail:

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