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Articles containing the keyword 'nutrition'.

Category: Research article

article id 10034, category Research article
Yan Ao, Peter M. Hirst, Guolei Li, Yahui Miao, Runzhe Zhang. (2018). Combined effects of provenance and slow-release fertilizer on nursery and field performance of yellowhorn seedlings. Silva Fennica vol. 52 no. 5 article id 10034. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.10034
Highlights: Combining slow-release fertilizer (SRF) and provenance in the nursery has large effects on most seedling characteristics in yellowhorn; Stem and root P contents in the nursery, and height at the end of the second growing season (T3) in the field were mainly affected by provenance; Higher rates of SRF tended to increase root N, stem and root P contents in the nursery, diameter, and biomass at T3; The combination of AQ provenance with 120–200 mg N seedling–1 SRF yielding better nursery and field performance was recommended.

Yellowhorn (Xanthoceras sorbifolium Bunge) has been widely planted for biodiesel production in China, but has frequently shown poor field performance. Container-grown yellowhorn seedlings originating from three Chinese provenances, Wengniute Qi (WQ), Alukeerqin Qi (AQ), and Shanxian (SX), were fertilized with slow-release fertilizer (SRF) at 40, 80, 120, 160 or 200 mg N seedling–1. Tree growth, survival and nutrient content were measured after one year’s growth in a greenhouse followed by two years in a field site. Plants from AQ and SX tended to have higher stem and root P contents in the nursery. Higher rates of SRF increased root N, and stem and root P contents. After one year in the nursery, there were a number of interactions between provenance and SRF for plant growth responses and nutrient content in the nursery, however after two years of additional growth in the field, plants from the different provenances generally responded similarly to applied SRF in the nursery, with few interactions. Final plant height was approximately 10% lower in trees from provenance SX but was not affected by application of SRF. Conversely, final trunk diameter and stem and root biomass were unaffected by provenance but increased with higher rates of applied SRF. Our results indicate that application of SRF may be a useful tool to nutrient load yellowhorn in the nursery and facilitate transplanting performance in the field. Overall, optimal nursery and field performance of yellowhorn were observed in provenance AQ at 120–200 mg N seedling–1 SRF. We suggest that growers consider a wider range of yellowhorn provenances and SRF rates (above 200 mg N seedling–1) to yield even better growth response.

  • Ao, Key Laboratory for Silviculture and Conservation, Ministry of Education, Beijing Forestry University, 35 East Qinghua Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083, China ORCID ID:E-mail: aoyan316@163.com (email)
  • Hirst, Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA ORCID ID:E-mail: hirst@purdue.edu
  • Li, Key Laboratory for Silviculture and Conservation, Ministry of Education, Beijing Forestry University, 35 East Qinghua Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083, China ORCID ID:E-mail: glli226@163.com
  • Miao, Key Laboratory for Silviculture and Conservation, Ministry of Education, Beijing Forestry University, 35 East Qinghua Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083, China ORCID ID:E-mail: 372902610@qq.com
  • Zhang, College of Forestry, Beijing Forestry University, 35 East Qinghua Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083, China ORCID ID:E-mail: 793755837@qq.com
article id 208, category Research article
Mikko Räisänen, Tapani Repo, Tarja Lehto. (2009). Cold acclimation of Norway spruce roots and shoots after boron fertilization. Silva Fennica vol. 43 no. 2 article id 208. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.208
Boron deficiency, manifested as shoot dieback, is a problem in conifer stands growing on soils with high nitrogen availability in Fennoscandia. Earlier observations on Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst.) suggest that freezing tolerance is decreased by boron deficiency. Here, the effect of boron fertilization on cold acclimation of Norway spruce was studied in a young stand with initially low boron status two years after fertilization. Buds, stems, needles and roots were collected at five sampling times during cold acclimation and subsequently exposed to series of freezing temperatures. Lethal temperatures of organs were assessed by electrolyte leakage method (EL) and visual scoring of damage (VS). Freezing tolerance of buds was measured also by differential thermal analysis (DTA). The mean boron (B) concentration in needles was 4 mg kg–1 in unfertilized and 21 mg kg–1 in B-fertilized trees while critical level of B deficiency is considered to be 5 mg kg–1. The risk for increased freezing injuries in the low-B trees was not evident since all trees achieved cold hardiness that would be sufficient in central Finland. At two sampling times out of five, shoots or stem of B-fertilized trees were slightly more freezing tolerant than non-fertilized trees. However, the present study does not give strong evidence for the hypothesis that decreased freezing tolerance in B deficiency would be a triggering factor for leader dieback in Norway spruce at the B levels studied.
  • Räisänen, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forest Sciences, P.O.Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland; (present address), FAForest, FI-83480 Ahonkylä, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Repo, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu Unit, P.O. Box 68, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Lehto, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forest Sciences, P.O.Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: tarja.lehto@joensuu.fi
article id 350, category Research article
Ehsan Sayyad, Seyed Mohsen Hosseini, Jamshid Mokhtari, Reza Mahdavi, Seyed Gholamali Jalali, Moslem Akbarinia, Masoud Tabari. (2006). Comparison of growth, nutrition and soil properties of pure and mixed stands of Populus deltoides and Alnus subcordata. Silva Fennica vol. 40 no. 1 article id 350. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.350
Concerns about decline in soil fertility and long-term productivity of fast-growing plantations have promoted interest in using nitrogen-fixing trees in mixed species plantations. Populus deltoides and Alnus subcordata were planted in five proportions (100P, 67P:33A, 50P:50A, 33P:67A, 100A) in Noor, Iran. After 7 years, the effects of species interactions on tree growth and nutrient concentration in live and senescent leaves and soil properties were assessed. Diameter at breast height and total height of individual Populus trees were positively affected by the presence of Alnus. Nitrogen concentrations in fully expanded and senescent leaves of Populus were higher in mixed plantations than monoculture plantations. The results of nutrition and nutrient return and growth indicated that mixed plantations of these two species were more productive and sustainable than their monoculture plantations. Within the framework of this experiment, it appeared that production was maximized when these two species were grown together in the relative proportions of 50% Populus and 50% Alnus.
  • Sayyad, Tarbiat Modarres University, Natural Resources Faculty, Emam St. Noor, 46414 Noor, Mazandaran, Iran ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Hosseini, Tarbiat Modarres University, Natural Resources Faculty, Emam St. Noor, 46414 Noor, Mazandaran, Iran ORCID ID:E-mail: hosseini@europe.com (email)
  • Mokhtari, Tarbiat Modarres University, Natural Resources Faculty, Emam St. Noor, 46414 Noor, Mazandaran, Iran ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Mahdavi, Tarbiat Modarres University, Natural Resources Faculty, Emam St. Noor, 46414 Noor, Mazandaran, Iran ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Jalali, Tarbiat Modarres University, Natural Resources Faculty, Emam St. Noor, 46414 Noor, Mazandaran, Iran ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Akbarinia, Tarbiat Modarres University, Natural Resources Faculty, Emam St. Noor, 46414 Noor, Mazandaran, Iran ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Tabari, Tarbiat Modarres University, Natural Resources Faculty, Emam St. Noor, 46414 Noor, Mazandaran, Iran ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 540, category Research article
Finn H. Brække, Nagwa Salih. (2002). Reliability of foliar analyses of Norway spruce stands in a Nordic gradient. Silva Fennica vol. 36 no. 2 article id 540. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.540
Norway spruce stands at eleven sites in Finland, Norway and Sweden have been studied under various climates, atmospheric deposition of N and S and fertilisation regimes. Nitrogen was growth restricting at eight inland sites, while P was growth restricting at three coastal sites. Liming and N fertilisation caused serious B deficiency on some of the inland sites. It is likely that liming affects uptake of B, whereas N fertilisation causes a dilution due to increased growth. Application of S combined with N probably caused K deficiency at one of the sites. The reliability of foliar analyses as a method to diagnose nutrient status and the likely changes after nutrient input to spruce forests in the Nordic countries, are discussed. The CR- and the DOP-method are evaluated for diagnostic purposes. Both methods seem to give reliable conclusions even if the CR-method often produces more specific results. Interpretation based on both current and one year old foliage improved the diagnostic prognoses. The accuracy of diagnosis also relies on knowledge and ability of the interpreter. Based on the results it is reason to be cautious about recommendations of single element fertilisations, e.g. with N alone, because the demand of other elements beyond available pools frequently occurs. Forest trees in the boreal region are probably well adapted to N deficiency, which means that they can handle the physiological consequences rather well, while deficiencies of other elements usually are more detrimental to growth vigour and stress related diseases.
  • Brække, Department of Forest Sciences, Agricultural University of Norway (AUN), P.O. Box 5044, N-1432 Ås, Norway ORCID ID:E-mail: finn.braekke@isf.nlh.no (email)
  • Salih, Department of Ecology and Environmental Research, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), P.O. Box 7072, S-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:

Category: Article

article id 5633, category Article
Seppo Kaunisto, Tytti Sarjala. (1997). Critical needle potassium concentrations indicated by diamine putrescine in Norway spruce growing on peat soils. Silva Fennica vol. 31 no. 4 article id 5633. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a8535

Dormant needles from 129 Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.) trees from the 2nd and 3rd topmost whorls were collected from spruce stands locating fairly close to each other. Tree height varied from 8 to 25 metres. Trees with and without visual potassium deficiency symptoms in needles were selected and analysed for nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, magnesium, boron, copper, zinc, and 3 free polyamines putrescine, spermine and spermidine.

The concentrations of all the analysed nutrients ranged from deficient to satisfactory levels. Free putrescine, spermidine and spermine concentrations in the current needles had a wide variation between the trees. Spermidine had a positive and spermine a negative correlation with potassium. Putrescine had a strong negative correlation with potassium with statistically significant increase in putrescine starting at potassium concentrations below 5.4 mg/g dry weight. The regression between putrescine and potassium changed from a linear to a non-linear form at the potassium concentration of 4.2–4.6 mg/g dry weight representing a severe K deficiency limit. The corresponding K/P ratio was 2.6–2.7. Extremely low phosphorus concentrations (P < 1.0 mg/g) lowered putrescine concentrations, but otherwise the relationships between putrescine, spermidine or spermine and potassium concentrations were unaffected by tree nutrition. At adequate potassium levels the putrescine concentrations were only slightly lower in trees taller than 20 metres than in trees of 8–16 metres height. The results show that the needle putrescine concentration can be used quite reliably for describing potassium nutrition of Norway spruce in varying nutritional and tree size conditions.

  • Kaunisto, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Sarjala, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5589, category Article
Jouko Silvola, Urpo Ahlholm. (1996). Effects of CO2 concentration on the nutrition of willows (Salix phylicifolia) grown at different nutrient levels in organic-rich soil. Silva Fennica vol. 30 no. 2–3 article id 5589. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a9234

Willows (Salix phylicifolia) were grown for four months in organic rich soil at four nutrient levels (fertilization with a micronutrient-macronutrient mixture of 0, 100, 500 and 1,000 kg ha-1 per month) and four CO2 concentrations (300, 500, 700 and 1,000 ppm). Nitrogen and phosphorus concentration of the willows were reduced at CO2 enhancement, the decrease being larger in the leave and roots than in the stems. Nitrogen content of the willows plus extractable nitrate-N in the soil coincided well with the doses of nitrogen supplied, but the corresponding sum of phosphorus in the plants and soil were smaller. The total nitrogen content of willows grown in unfertilized soil was nearly two times higher than the sum of the extractable nitrate-N in soil and N content of the cutting at the beginning of the experiment. The contents of nitrogen and phosphorus of the unfertilized willows were independent of CO2 concentration, suggesting that CO2 concentration did not affect through increased mineralization the availability of those nutrients to the willows.

  • Silvola, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Ahlholm, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5589, category Article
Jouko Silvola, Urpo Ahlholm. (1996). Effects of CO2 concentration on the nutrition of willows (Salix phylicifolia) grown at different nutrient levels in organic-rich soil. Silva Fennica vol. 30 no. 2–3 article id 5589. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a9234

Willows (Salix phylicifolia) were grown for four months in organic rich soil at four nutrient levels (fertilization with a micronutrient-macronutrient mixture of 0, 100, 500 and 1,000 kg ha-1 per month) and four CO2 concentrations (300, 500, 700 and 1,000 ppm). Nitrogen and phosphorus concentration of the willows were reduced at CO2 enhancement, the decrease being larger in the leave and roots than in the stems. Nitrogen content of the willows plus extractable nitrate-N in the soil coincided well with the doses of nitrogen supplied, but the corresponding sum of phosphorus in the plants and soil were smaller. The total nitrogen content of willows grown in unfertilized soil was nearly two times higher than the sum of the extractable nitrate-N in soil and N content of the cutting at the beginning of the experiment. The contents of nitrogen and phosphorus of the unfertilized willows were independent of CO2 concentration, suggesting that CO2 concentration did not affect through increased mineralization the availability of those nutrients to the willows.

  • Silvola, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Ahlholm, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5057, category Article
Rainer Rauramaa, Kaj Husman, Katriina Kukkonen, Erkki Voutilainen. (1980). Metsurien ravinto ja seerumin lipoproteiinit - esitutkimus. Silva Fennica vol. 14 no. 1 article id 5057. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a14998
English title: Preliminary observations about diet, serum lipids and lipoproteins among lumberjacks.

Energy intake of ten lumberjacks in Eastern Finland was estimated by using 24-hour recall. In addition, serum cholesterol and triglycerides were analysed in different lipoprotein fractions. Average energy intake was according to present recommendations in Finland, although there was great individual variation. Serum triglycerides were in the normal range. Five lumberjacks’ total cholesterol concentration was somewhat increased. Average HDL concentration was clearly greater than in men of the same age.

The PDF includes a summary in English.

  • Rauramaa, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Husman, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kukkonen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Voutilainen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 4977, category Article
C. J. Westman. (1977). Nutrient cycle in tree stands - Nordic symposium. Silva Fennica vol. 11 no. 3 article id 4977. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a14830

The Nordic working group for forest fertilization is a group of research workers from the Nordic countries Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden, which has been working on plant nutrition questions and forest amelioration problems. The group has met annually to discuss current problems, hitherto mostly concerning forest fertilization. In 1976 the question of future working forms came up, and the group decided to arrange a symposium on the subject Nutrient cycle in tree stands in 1977.

This symposium took place in Harjavalta and Ikalis in Finland from the 29th of August to 1st of September 1977. During the symposium 12 papers were presented, which are published in the following, either in full or as summaries of a given lecture. Part of the lectures are in English and part in Swedish.

The paper includes the following titles:

A bioelement budget of an old Scots pine forest in Central Sweden

Mobilization of plant nutrients in a Scots pine forest Mor in Central Sweden

Accumulation of organic matter and nitrogen on sand dunes following sand fixation and planting of dwarf mountain pine

Sambandet mellan torvmarkstyp och yttorvens näringshalt

Changes in the amounts of inorganic nutrients in the soil after clear-felling

Plant nutrient balance in decoration greenery cultivation

The effect of forest fertilization on primary production and nutrient cycling in the forest ecosystem

Förändringar i humuslagret efter skogsgödling

Balanserad näringsupptagning och behovet av gödsling i trädbestånd på näringsfattiga torvmarker

Of fertilization on nutrient contents in needles and litter fall of Scots pine on dwarf shrub pine swamp

Micro-nutrient deficiencies cause growth disturbances in trees

Tallarnas växtstörningar, markens näringsbalans och micronäringsbrist

  • Westman, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 4647, category Article
Pekka Sainio. (1955). Hirven talvisesta ravinnosta. Silva Fennica no. 88 article id 4647. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a9109
English title: Winter nutrition of elk.

Increase in the elk (Alces alces L.) population and the problems of its grazing has called for detailed research. The present study concentrated on three observation areas representing northern, western and eastern parts of Finland. There were 28 field observers watching 68 elks.

Earlier investigations in Finland indicate that aspen (Populus tremula L.) is the staple diet of elk. This study reached different conclusions, probably largely because of aspen is gradually becoming an increasingly rare tree species in Finland. According to this study, the principal food of elk in the winter is willow (Salix sp.). In the whole country, willow accounts for about 70% of elk’s nutrition. In the Far North the percentage is approx. 90. Of the other tree species, the order of preference is: aspen, Scots pine, mountain ash, juniper and birch. In addition, in Western Finland where snow is less deep, lingonberry and blueberry shrubs are on the menu. Beard moss on the spruce was frequently eaten locally. Elk seems to have eaten mainly the last annual shoot of trees and bushes. In few cases it has gnawed the bark of Scots pine, aspen and willow. Elk consumes in average 340 twigs or terminal shoots per day in the winter. This corresponds to about 1.8 kg of food.

The problem of elks damaging Scots pine seedlings has been observed in Western Finland, were the elk population is higher. The article suggests that suitable feeding places would be left for elk in places that are unsuitable for agriculture or forestry. Leaving, for instance, birch seedlings in Scots pine stands has been noticed to attract elks and to increase the damage to pine.

The article includes an abstract in English and a summary in Swedish.

  • Sainio, ORCID ID:E-mail:

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