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Silva Fennica 1926-1997
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Articles containing the keyword 'oak'.

Category: Research article

article id 6991, category Research article
Isabel León, Juan José García, Manuel Fernández, Javier Vázquez-Piqué, Raúl Tapias. (2017). Differences in root growth of Quercus ilex and Quercus suber seedlings infected with Phytophthora cinnamomi. Silva Fennica vol. 51 no. 4 article id 6991. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.6991
Highlights: Root growth of two Quercus sp. differs significantly after infection with Phytophthora cinnamomi; We observed a marked decrease in the growth of new roots in Quercus ilex with increasing inoculum level; Roots were longer but thinner with a moderate inoculum level in Quercus suber.

In the southwest of the Iberian Peninsula, Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands is causing irreversible damage to populations of the two most common species of Quercus, the holm oak (Quercus ilex L.) and the cork oak (Quercus suber L.). Although the symptoms are similar in the two species, the mortality rates are different. We found significant differences in the post-infection growth of the root system as a function of tree species, as well as initial plant size, and inoculum level. We observed a marked decrease in the growth of new roots in Q. ilex with increasing inoculum level, while in Q. suber, we found longer but thinner roots with a moderate inoculum level. In both species, we observed a worsening in the water status of the plants from the lowest inoculum level.

  • León, University of Huelva, Agroforestry department, Calle Dr. Cantero Cuadrado, 6, 21004 Huelva, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail: isabel.leon@dcaf.uhu.es
  • García, University of Huelva, Agroforestry department, Calle Dr. Cantero Cuadrado, 6, 21004 Huelva, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail: juanjose.garcia@dcaf.uhu.es
  • Fernández, University of Huelva, Agroforestry department, Calle Dr. Cantero Cuadrado, 6, 21004 Huelva, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail: nonoe@uhu.es
  • Vázquez-Piqué, University of Huelva, Agroforestry department, Calle Dr. Cantero Cuadrado, 6, 21004 Huelva, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail: jpique@dcaf.uhu.es
  • Tapias, University of Huelva, Agroforestry department, Calle Dr. Cantero Cuadrado, 6, 21004 Huelva, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail: rtapias@uhu.es (email)
article id 6991, category Research article
Isabel León, Juan José García, Manuel Fernández, Javier Vázquez-Piqué, Raúl Tapias. (2017). Differences in root growth of Quercus ilex and Quercus suber seedlings infected with Phytophthora cinnamomi. Silva Fennica vol. 51 no. 4 article id 6991. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.6991
Highlights: Root growth of two Quercus sp. differs significantly after infection with Phytophthora cinnamomi; We observed a marked decrease in the growth of new roots in Quercus ilex with increasing inoculum level; Roots were longer but thinner with a moderate inoculum level in Quercus suber.

In the southwest of the Iberian Peninsula, Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands is causing irreversible damage to populations of the two most common species of Quercus, the holm oak (Quercus ilex L.) and the cork oak (Quercus suber L.). Although the symptoms are similar in the two species, the mortality rates are different. We found significant differences in the post-infection growth of the root system as a function of tree species, as well as initial plant size, and inoculum level. We observed a marked decrease in the growth of new roots in Q. ilex with increasing inoculum level, while in Q. suber, we found longer but thinner roots with a moderate inoculum level. In both species, we observed a worsening in the water status of the plants from the lowest inoculum level.

  • León, University of Huelva, Agroforestry department, Calle Dr. Cantero Cuadrado, 6, 21004 Huelva, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail: isabel.leon@dcaf.uhu.es
  • García, University of Huelva, Agroforestry department, Calle Dr. Cantero Cuadrado, 6, 21004 Huelva, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail: juanjose.garcia@dcaf.uhu.es
  • Fernández, University of Huelva, Agroforestry department, Calle Dr. Cantero Cuadrado, 6, 21004 Huelva, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail: nonoe@uhu.es
  • Vázquez-Piqué, University of Huelva, Agroforestry department, Calle Dr. Cantero Cuadrado, 6, 21004 Huelva, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail: jpique@dcaf.uhu.es
  • Tapias, University of Huelva, Agroforestry department, Calle Dr. Cantero Cuadrado, 6, 21004 Huelva, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail: rtapias@uhu.es (email)
article id 6991, category Research article
Isabel León, Juan José García, Manuel Fernández, Javier Vázquez-Piqué, Raúl Tapias. (2017). Differences in root growth of Quercus ilex and Quercus suber seedlings infected with Phytophthora cinnamomi. Silva Fennica vol. 51 no. 4 article id 6991. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.6991
Highlights: Root growth of two Quercus sp. differs significantly after infection with Phytophthora cinnamomi; We observed a marked decrease in the growth of new roots in Quercus ilex with increasing inoculum level; Roots were longer but thinner with a moderate inoculum level in Quercus suber.

In the southwest of the Iberian Peninsula, Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands is causing irreversible damage to populations of the two most common species of Quercus, the holm oak (Quercus ilex L.) and the cork oak (Quercus suber L.). Although the symptoms are similar in the two species, the mortality rates are different. We found significant differences in the post-infection growth of the root system as a function of tree species, as well as initial plant size, and inoculum level. We observed a marked decrease in the growth of new roots in Q. ilex with increasing inoculum level, while in Q. suber, we found longer but thinner roots with a moderate inoculum level. In both species, we observed a worsening in the water status of the plants from the lowest inoculum level.

  • León, University of Huelva, Agroforestry department, Calle Dr. Cantero Cuadrado, 6, 21004 Huelva, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail: isabel.leon@dcaf.uhu.es
  • García, University of Huelva, Agroforestry department, Calle Dr. Cantero Cuadrado, 6, 21004 Huelva, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail: juanjose.garcia@dcaf.uhu.es
  • Fernández, University of Huelva, Agroforestry department, Calle Dr. Cantero Cuadrado, 6, 21004 Huelva, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail: nonoe@uhu.es
  • Vázquez-Piqué, University of Huelva, Agroforestry department, Calle Dr. Cantero Cuadrado, 6, 21004 Huelva, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail: jpique@dcaf.uhu.es
  • Tapias, University of Huelva, Agroforestry department, Calle Dr. Cantero Cuadrado, 6, 21004 Huelva, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail: rtapias@uhu.es (email)
article id 1684, category Research article
Anna Kowalska, Jan Marek Matuszkiewicz, Jerzy Solon, Anna Kozłowska. (2017). Indicators of ancient forests in nutrient-deficient pine habitats. Silva Fennica vol. 51 no. 1 article id 1684. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1684
Highlights: Distinct groups of species with a preference for ancient pine and mixed oak-pine forests can be determined; The ancient forest indicator composition in pine habitats differs remarkably from ancient forest indicators in deciduous forests; Dispersal-related traits significantly distinguish ancient forest indicators from other species found in nutrient-poor forest habitats.

Pine forests are common in many European regions. Nonetheless, there are only a few studies on regeneration of plant species populations in nutrient-deficient pine habitats. Ancient temperate forests are perceived to be particularly important objects of environmental conservation, due to their ability to sustain a considerable number of rare and vulnerable species. In this paper, we present indicator species of ancient pine and mixed oak-pine forests, together with their trait profiles. Phytosociological relevés were collected from mature stands in the Masuria and Kurpie regions of central Poland. Forest persistence was determined on the basis of historical maps, with the data set divided into three categories. The indicator value of species was evaluated using Tichý and Chytrý’s phi coefficient. Functional response traits of indicator species were identified. Distinct groups of species with a preference for ancient forests can be determined. The dispersal-related traits significantly distinguish ancient forest indicators from other species found in nutrient-poor forest habitats. Since the low potential for long-distance dispersal hinders the establishment of new plant populations in isolated stands, we stress the need to avoid ancient forest clearance and fragmentation of woodland; afforestation should be located in the vicinity of ancient stands. Moreover, as recent forests have turned out to support several rare plant species, to maintain phytodiversity on a landscape level a mixture of ancient and recent forests, both managed and strictly protected, is needed.

  • Kowalska, Institute of Geography and Spatial Organization, Polish Academy of Science, Twarda 51/55, 00-818 Warsaw, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: aniak@twarda.pan.pl (email)
  • Matuszkiewicz, Institute of Geography and Spatial Organization, Polish Academy of Science, Twarda 51/55, 00-818 Warsaw, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: jan.mat@twarda.pan.pl
  • Solon, Institute of Geography and Spatial Organization, Polish Academy of Science, Twarda 51/55, 00-818 Warsaw, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: j.solon@twarda.pan.pl
  • Kozłowska, Institute of Geography and Spatial Organization, Polish Academy of Science, Twarda 51/55, 00-818 Warsaw, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: a.kozl@twarda.pan.pl
article id 1328, category Research article
Nelly N. Selochnik, Nataliya V. Pashenova, Evgeny Sidorov, Michael J. Wingfield, Riikka Linnakoski. (2015). Ophiostomatoid fungi and their roles in Quercus robur die-back in Tellermann forest, Russia. Silva Fennica vol. 49 no. 5 article id 1328. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1328
Highlights: Dominant ophiostomatoid fungi associated with Q. robur in the post-outbreak region of oak die-back were investigated; Ophiostoma quercus was the most commonly encountered fungus; This is the first report of O. grandicarpum from Russia; The results of preliminary pathogenicity experiments demonstrate that fungi investigated in this study are unlikely to play causal role in oak die-back

Several eastern European countries have reported outbreaks of oak die-back during the 1980’s. Species of Ophiostoma Syd. were isolated from diseased trees and have been suggested to be the possible causal agents of the die-back, but this view have generally not been accepted. In order to monitor the post-outbreak region of oak die-back and to consider the possible role of Ophiostoma spp. in the syndrome, research has been conducted in the Tellerman forest, Voronezh region, Russia between 2005 and 2011. Our study resulted in the isolation of ophiostomatoid fungi from Quercus robur L. trees displaying external signs of desiccation. Fungi were identified based on morphological characteristics and DNA sequence comparisons. Three species of Ophiostoma were identified including O. grandicarpum (Kowalski & Butin) Rulamort, a species closely related to O. abietinum Marm. & Butin, O. fusiforme Aghayeva & M.J. Wingf. and O. lunatum Aghayeva & M.J. Wingf. representing a poorly understood species complex, and most commonly O. quercus (Georgev.) Nannf. Pathogenicity of these fungi was tested using artificial inoculations on Q. robur trees. The fungi were shown to be non-pathogenic and unlikely to play any role in oak die-back. These fungi are most likely only components in a complex of abiotic, biotic and anthropogenic factors that have contributed to a die-back of Quercus spp. in Russia.

  • Selochnik, Forest Science Institute of RAS, Uspenskoe 143030, Moscow Region, Russia ORCID ID:E-mail: lenelse@yandex.ru
  • Pashenova, V.N. Sukachev Institute of Forest SB RAS, Krasnoyarsk 660036, Russia ORCID ID:E-mail: pasnat@ksc.krasn.ru
  • Sidorov, Department of Forest Protection and Game Management, St. Petersburg State Forest Technical University, St. Petersburg 194021, Russia ORCID ID:E-mail: sidorov_evgeny@mail.ru
  • Wingfield, Forestry and Agricultural Biotechnology Institute (FABI), University of Pretoria, 0002 Pretoria, South Africa ORCID ID:E-mail: mike.wingfield@up.ac.za
  • Linnakoski, Forestry and Agricultural Biotechnology Institute (FABI), University of Pretoria, 0002 Pretoria, South Africa; Department of Forest Sciences, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 27, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-3294-8088 E-mail: riikka.linnakoski@helsinki.fi (email)
article id 1274, category Research article
Juho Hautsalo, Paul Mathieu, Sakina Elshibli, Pekka Vakkari, Juha Raisio, Pertti Pulkkinen. (2015). Variation in height and survival among northern populations of pedunculate oak (Quercus robur L.): results of a 13-year field study. Silva Fennica vol. 49 no. 2 article id 1274. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1274
Highlights: A height-sum function allowed us to compare the combined growth and survival of northernmost stands of pedunculate oak; Individuals from Turku-Katariinanlaakso performed the best, although other families performed more consistently across trials, which should be considered in future conservation and breeding. Surprisingly, trees planted in a trial location beyond the natural northern limit of pedunculate oak showed the best performance.
We analysed the adaptive potential of pedunculate oak (Quercus robur L.) in terms of variation in height and survival in five field trials located in southern and central Finland. The trials were established with Finnish native material from six different seed origins. Thirteen years after planting, the number of living trees was counted and measured for height. Analysis of height and survival revealed a significant effect of origin, i.e., a genetic basis to individual tree performance. Two origins from the Turku region (Ruissalo and Katariinanlaakso) performed the best while trees originating from Parainen (Lenholmen) performed the worst. In order to study the effects due to tree origin, a comparison of families (half-sibling trees, i.e. those sharing the same ‘mother’ tree) was made by combining height and survival through a height-sum equation (i.e., the product of mean survival and height of each family in each trial) and used to calculate family- and origin-level ecovalences. Ecovalence is a metric for performance consistency, and indicates how much each variable contributes to the total variation; the higher the value, the lower the consistency of trees across the trials based on their origin or family. Analysis of consistency showed similar results to growth and survival, with Turku families performing the best and families from Parainen performing the worst. Families in the Katariinanlaakso stand (Turku) generally had more stable ecovalence values and more dispersed height-sums, while Ruissalo (Turku) families had higher mean height-sum but higher variability in ecovalence values. These results suggest that seed origins (i.e., genotypes) can be optimized in terms of their suitability for commercial or ecological forest management.
  • Hautsalo,  Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Green technology, Antinniementie 1, FI-41330 Vihtavuori, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: juho.hautsalo@luke.fi (email)
  • Mathieu, Agrocampus Ouest, 35000 Rennes, France ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Elshibli, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Vakkari, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: pekka.vakkari@luke.fi
  • Raisio, City of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Pulkkinen, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: pertti.pulkkinen@luke.fi
article id 240, category Research article
Monika Dering, Andrzej Lewandowski, Krzysztof Ufnalski, Aleksandra Kedzierska. (2008). How far to the east was the migration of white oaks from the Iberian refugium? Silva Fennica vol. 42 no. 3 article id 240. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.240
The goal of this study was to investigate the postglacial recolonization pathways of the white oaks Quercus robur and Quercus petrea in Poland, and especially to evaluate the impact of Iberian refugium in this part of Europe. Chloroplast DNA polymorphism of 310 individuals older than 200 years was analyzed. Six haplotypes in total were found to differentiate three maternal lineages: the Balkan (haplotypes 4, 5, and 7), the Apennine (haplotypes 1 and 2), and the Iberian (haplotype 12). The most abundant were members of the Balkan (71.5% of all samples) and the Apennine lineage (23.1%), and only 5.4% of individuals were of Iberian origin. The geographic distribution of the three lineages is clearly structured. The northernmost territories of Poland are occupied by Apennine (haplotype 1) and Iberian (haplotype 12) lineages, whereas samples in central and southern Poland represents the Balkan lineage. The population structure might be the result of competitive colonization among lineages after migration from different refugia. It is likely that colonization of northernmost parts of Poland by the Balkan lineage was halted or at least hampered due to the arrival of the Apennine populations. The most significant result of this study concerns the presence and status of the Iberian lineage in Poland, which is most likely of natural origin.
  • Dering, Polish Academy of Sciences, Institute of Dendrology, Parkowa 5, Kornik, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: usnea@o2.pl (email)
  • Lewandowski, Polish Academy of Sciences, Institute of Dendrology, Parkowa 5, Kornik, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Ufnalski, Polish Academy of Sciences, Institute of Dendrology, Parkowa 5, Kornik, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kedzierska, Polish Academy of Sciences, Institute of Dendrology, Parkowa 5, Kornik, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail:

Category: Article

article id 5178, category Article
Reijo Solantie. (1983). "Mereisyyden - mantereisuuden" ja "humidisuuden" käsitteistä erityisesti tammen luontaisen levinneisyyden perusteella. Silva Fennica vol. 17 no. 1 article id 5178. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15093
English title: Concepts of continentality-oceanity and humidity especially in the light of the natural distribution of Quercus robur.

Climatological factors determining the natural northern boundary in Europe of oak (Quercus robur L.) were investigated. The natural northern boundary of oak corresponds in detail to the curve at which the growing season, beginning at +5°C in spring and ending at +10°C in autumn, is of a certain constant length. The northern boundaries for more oceanic plants can be explained by prolonged autumn activity. This is obviously the general explanation or the concept of oceanity. Oak spread markedly in Finland in the summers during 1961–1975, which on an average were as warm but much dried than those during 1931–1960. The importance of humidity for oak was discussed.

The PDF includes a summary in English.

  • Solantie, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5089, category Article
Seppo Kellomäki. (1980). Alustavia mittaustuloksia kuivauksen ja liotuksen vaikutuksesta kuorellisen mänty- ja kuusipuutavaran kuoren paksuuteen. Silva Fennica vol. 14 no. 4 article id 5089. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15030
English title: Preliminary results of the effect of drying and soaking of the bark thickness of Scots pine and Norway spruce.

On the basis of a limited material, the drying of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.) timber at room temperature decreased the thickness of the bark proportionally to the decrease in the moisture content. The decrease was the greatest in the middle portion of the trunk. In the spruce material, the decrease in bark thickness was exceeded by the shrinkage of the wood. During soaking, the bark thickness of both tree species decreased, too, contrary to the presupposed hypothesis. In both cases, the shrinkage was the greatest in the middle portion of the trunk. In the spruce material, the decrease in bark thickness was exceeded by the shrinkage of the wood. Possible explanation for the phenomenon is discussed.

The PDF includes a summary in English.

  • Kellomäki, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 4969, category Article
Robert J. Rainio. (1977). Tammen levinneisyydestä läntisellä Uudellamaalla ja Turunmaan itäisimmissä osissa. Silva Fennica vol. 11 no. 2 article id 4969. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a14820
English title: On the distribution of oak (Quercus robur) in the southwest parts of Finland.

The maps concerning the natural distribution of oak (Quercus robur L.) have proved most unreliable in detailed examination. In this paper, the author has collected his observations on natural oak in the westernmost parts of the province of Uusimaa and the easternmost parts of province of Turunmaa, the islands included. Furthermore, the paper includes some viewpoints which must be considered as criteria when determining the naturality of the stand in question. Future borders of oak’s distribution range must be moved farther up north to replace the earlier views of the northern limit of natural oak in Finland.

The PDF includes a summary in English.

  • Rainio, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 7552, category Article
Eino Oinonen. (1971). The time table of vegetative spreading in oak fern (Carpogymnia dryopteris (L.) LÖVE & LÖVE) and may-lily (Maianthemum bifolium (L.) F. W. SCHMIDT) in Southern Finland. Acta Forestalia Fennica no. 118 article id 7552. https://doi.org/10.14214/aff.7552

The rate of vegetative spreading in oak fern (Carpogymnia dryopteris) and may-lily (Maianthemum bifolium) was studied by comparing the size of stands formed by individual plants of these species with those of other species growing on the same sites as well as with the time that had elapsed since the last fire on the sites and the age of the tree stand. The average maximum rates of spreading showed to be of similar magnitude in both species, being 12.6 cm/year in oak fern and 12.3 cm/year in may-lily; these values correspond to a radial growth of 6.3 and 6.1 cm year respectively. The maximum radial growth recorded was about 7 cm/year in both species.

The PDF includes a summary in Finnish.

  • Oinonen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 4627, category Article
Paavo Jaakko Ollinmaa. (1952). Jalot lehtipuumme luontaisina ja viljeltyinä. Silva Fennica no. 77 article id 4627. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a9099
English title: Native and cultivated southern broadleaved tree species in Finland.

The aim of the study was to update knowledge of natural range of English oak (Quercus robur L.), European ash (Fraxinus exelsior L.), Norway maple (Acer platanoides L.), small-leaved lime (Tilia cordata Miller), wych elm (Ulmus glabra Mill.) and European white elm (Ulmus laevis Pall.) in Finland, and estimate how far north they could be grown as forest trees or as park trees. The study is based on literature and questionnaires sent to cities and towns, District Forestry Boards, districts of Forest Service, Forestry Management Associations and railway stations.

The northern borders in the natural range of the species succeed one another from south to north as follows: English oak, European ash, Norway maple, wych elm, and small-leaved lime. Occurrence of European white elm is sporadic. The English oak forms forests in the southernmost Finland, while the other species grow only as small stands, groups or solitary trees. According to experiences of planted stands or trees, the northern limits of the species succeed one another from south to north as follows: European ash, English oak, Norway maple, European white elm, wych elm and small-leaved lime. All the species are grown in parks fairly generally up to the district of Kuopio-Vaasa (63 °). The northern limits where the species can be grown as park trees reach considerably further north in the western part of the country than in the east.

The article includes a summary in English.

  • Ollinmaa, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 4522, category Article
A. V. Auer. (1937). Muhkurin kasvisto. Silva Fennica no. 41 article id 4522. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a9067
English title: Vegetation in Muhkuri experimental area in southwest Finland.

A vegetation analysis was performed in Muhkuri experimental area of the Forest Research Institute. The area is located in southwest Finland near city of Turku. The dominant tree species of the area is oak (Quercus robur L.) which can be found in all the area. Common woody species are also aspen (Populus tremula L.), mountain ash (Sorbus aucuparia L.), hazel (Corylus avellana L.), juniper (Juniperus communis L.) and mountain currant (Ribes alpinum L.). A total of 198 vascular plants were found in the area, 34 of which were common in most parts of the area. Typical vegetation of different parts of the area is described. Finally, a list of all plant species is presented in the article.

The PDF includes a summary in German.

  • Auer, ORCID ID:E-mail:

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