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Articles containing the keyword 'radial growth'.

Category: Research article

article id 360, category Research article
Timo Kurkela, Tarmo Aalto, Martti Varama, Risto Jalkanen. (2005). Defoliation by the common pine sawfly (Diprion pini) and subsequent growth reduction in Scots pine: a retrospective approach. Silva Fennica vol. 39 no. 4 article id 360. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.360
The foliage status in the main stem of Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris) was studied retrospectively using the needle trace method (NTM) on a stand, seriously defoliated by the pine sawfly (Diprion pini) in the 1980s. Needle density increased abruptly in the seasons following the defoliation. The strongest reduction in annual needle production occurred one year later. As a consequence of lower needle production, the annual number of attached needles decreased three to five years after the defoliation. Needle retention and the average age of attached needles tended to increase after defoliation. In analyses of covariance with the NTM variables, needle density (logarithmic transformed values) and average age of attached needles, had the highest, significant, negative relationship with radial and height increments both in the period prior to the defoliation and in the time when the trees were suffering from defoliation. The relationships between height increment and the number of needles and needle loss were positive and significant. Also radial increment had a positive relationship with the number of needles but not with needle loss. Interestingly, an abrupt increase in the needle density gave a good indication of the effects of a sudden defoliation in pines.
  • Kurkela, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa Research Unit, P.O. Box 18, FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: timo.kurkela@metla.fi (email)
  • Aalto, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Rovaniemi Research Unit, P.O. Box 16, FI-96301 Rovaniemi, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Varama, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa Research Unit, P.O. Box 18, FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Jalkanen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Rovaniemi Research Unit, P.O. Box 16, FI-96301 Rovaniemi, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:

Category: Article

article id 5312, category Article
Timo Pukkala. (1987). Siementuotannon vaikutus kuusen ja männyn vuotuiseen kasvuun. Silva Fennica vol. 21 no. 2 article id 5312. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15469
English title: Effect of seed production on the annual growth of Picea abies and Pinus sylvestris.

The study material consisted of 13 rather old Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.) and 17 Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stands located in different parts of Finland. In each stand the seed crops, radial growth and amount of latewood were measured during a period of about ten years. Seed production reduces the radial growth of spruce and pine in the year of seed maturing. In Southern and Central Finland also the proportion of latewood is reduced. Seed production accounts for about 14% of the variation in radial growth of a spruce stand growing in Lapland, and 27% in other parts of Finland. In pine stands the seed crop explains 19% of the variation in radial growth in Lapland, and only 7% in the rest of Finland. In spruce stands an average seed crop reduces radial growth by 14% in Lapland and 5% in the rest of the country. An abundant seed production causes a reduction of about 20%. In southern parts of Finland, the proportion of latewood is reduced by 5% in an average seed year and by 24% in a good seed year. In pine stands an average seed crop decreases the width of annual ring by 5%, and a good seed crop by 15%. Outside Lapland, also the proportion of latewood is reduced: in an average seed year by 5%, and in a good seed year by 16%. The reduction in volume growth of spruce stands due to an average seed crop was estimated to be about 10% in Lapland, and 6% in other parts of Finland. A prolific seed production causes a reduction of 20%. In old pine stands the reduction is 5% in an average seed year, and 15% in a good seed year.

The PDF includes an abstract in English.

  • Pukkala, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5306, category Article
Timo Pukkala, Taneli Kolström. (1987). Competition indices and the prediction of radial growth in Scots pine. Silva Fennica vol. 21 no. 1 article id 5306. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15463

The effect of competition on the radial growth of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) was studied in three naturally regenerated stands located in North Karelia, Finland. The competition situation of an individual tree was described with various competition indices which depended on the sizes and distances from the neighbouring trees. One competition index explained about 50% of the variation in 5-year radial growth in one stand. If all stands were combined, one index explained 43.5%, two indices 48.9% and three indices 51.2% of the variation. In one stand, the best competition indices accounted for about 20% of that variation which could not be explained by tree diameter. If all three stands were combined, the best index explained 11% of the residual variation. About 40% of the variation in 5-year radial growth could not be explained by the diameter and competition indices.
The PDF includes an abstract in Finnish.

  • Pukkala, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kolström, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5092, category Article
Seppo Kellomäki, Markku Kanninen. (1980). Eco-physiological studies on young Scots pine stands. IV. Silva Fennica vol. 14 no. 4 article id 5092. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15033

Crown and stem growth of young Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris L.) were studied in relation to photosynthate supply and light condition in a stand. The magnitude of needle and bud formation, and radial and height growth were to a great extent dependent on the photosynthate supply. However, in shaded conditions the growth of each characteristics was greater than expected on the basis of photosynthate supply. In the stem system this was especially apparent for height growth. Consequently, height growth was favoured at the expense of radial growth in shaded conditions. It also appeared that the basic density of wood was negatively related to both tree position and photosynthate supply.

The PDF includes a summary in Finnish.

  • Kellomäki, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kanninen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5056, category Article
Liisa Nylund, Antti Haapanen, Seppo Kellomäki, Markku Nylund. (1980). Radial growth of Scots pine and soil conditions at some camping sites in southern Finland. Silva Fennica vol. 14 no. 1 article id 5056. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a14997

Radial growth of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) was investigated in seven camping areas located in Southern Finland. Radial growth reduction of 20–40% were found. The magnitude of this reduction was related to the amount of damage in the trees, and the age of the trees. A loss of humus, exposure of the roots and soil compaction were associated with the use of area but not related to the reduction in growth.

The PDF includes a summary in Finnish.

  • Nylund, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Haapanen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kellomäki, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Nylund, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5033, category Article
Tapani Haapanen, Pertti Hari, Seppo Kellomäki. (1979). Effect of fertilization and thinning on radial growth of Scots pine. Silva Fennica vol. 13 no. 2 article id 5033. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a14890

The radial growth of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stands at the age 30–40 years was measured retrospectively five years after the fertilizing and thinning of the stands. The abrupt effect of fertilizing was culminated 3–4 years after the treatment. The effect of thinning increased throughout the monitoring period. In stands that had been both thinned and fertilized, the effect of thinning was covered almost entirely by the effect of fertilizing, but fertilizing and thinning gave greater response than applying fertilizer or thinning only. 

The PDF includes a summary in Finnish.

  • Haapanen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Hari, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kellomäki, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 7618, category Article
Songkram Thammincha. (1981). Climatic variation in radial growth of Scots pine and Norway spruce and its importance in growth estimation. Acta Forestalia Fennica no. 171 article id 7618. https://doi.org/10.14214/aff.7618

Variation in the radial growth of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.) was studied in 10 localities in Southern Finland. The aim of the study was to utilize the information on variation in the growth indices for growth estimation, and to evaluate the relative accuracy of growth estimation based on the data from increment boring, in comparison to other methods.

The climatic variation in periodic growth (5-year-period) in Southern Finland is about 11% of the normal level. The results suggest that the data from 10 localities can be used in the computation of the index series for Southern Finland and that the data from 10 relascope plots are required in the study of the climatic variation in tree growth in a given locality. The standard error of the estimate in actual growth estimation for past and future periods by the stand function method is about 23%, the errors of the method involving increment boring being 6% and 16% respectively in past and future growth estimation. The respective methods yield about 20% and 13% error in average growth estimation. With aid of the average growth indices for Southern Finland in local growth estimation the accuracy is distinctly improved, the error being equal to 12% only, while the accuracy in other cases is slightly improved.

The PDF includes a summary in Finnish.

  • Thammincha, ORCID ID:E-mail:

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