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Articles containing the keyword 'shoot ratio'.

Category: Research article

article id 1631, category Research article
Jonas Koala, Louis Sawadogo, Patrice Savadogo, Ermias Aynekulu, Janne Heiskanen, Mohammed Saïd. (2017). Allometric equations for below-ground biomass of four key woody species in West African savanna-woodlands. Silva Fennica vol. 51 no. 3 article id 1631. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1631
Highlights: Species-specific equations for belowground biomass (BGB) predicted biomass with less bias than generic equations; All the generic equations underestimated BGB; For accurate estimation of BGB in savanna-woodlands, species-specific equations are needed for more species.

Accurate estimates of both above-ground biomass (AGB) and below-ground biomass (BGB) are essential for estimating carbon (C) balances at various geographical scales and formulating effective climate change mitigation programs. However, estimating BGB is challenging, particularly for forest ecosystems, so robust allometric equations are needed. To obtain such equations for savanna-woodlands of the West African north sudanian zone, we selected four common native woody species (Anogeissus leiocarpa (DC.) Guill. & Perr., Detarium microcarpum Guill. & Perr., Piliostigma thonningii (Schumach.) Milne-Redh. and Vitellaria paradoxa C.F. Gaertn.). At two sites in Burkina Faso, we determined the BGB of 30 trees of each of these species by excavation, and measured various above-ground dimensional variables. The root:shoot ratio varied widely among the species, from 0.1 to 3.4. Depending on the species, allometric equations based on stem basal area at 20 cm height, basal area at breast height and tree height explained 50–95% of the variation in BGB. The best generic equation we obtained, based on basal area at 20 cm, explained 60% of the variation in BGB across the species. Three previously published generic allometric equations underestimated BGB by 8 to 63%. The presented equations should significantly improve the accuracy of BGB estimates in savanna-woodlands and help avoid costly needs to excavate root systems.

  • Koala, Centre National de Recherche Scientifique et Technologique (CNRST), Institut de l’Environnement et de Recherches Agricoles (INERA), Département Productions Forestières, 03 BP 7047, Ouagadougou 03, Burkina Faso ORCID ID:E-mail: ezeyamb@yahoo.fr (email)
  • Sawadogo, Centre National de Recherche Scientifique et Technologique (CNRST), Institut de l’Environnement et de Recherches Agricoles (INERA), Département Productions Forestières, 03 BP 7047, Ouagadougou 03, Burkina Faso ORCID ID:E-mail: sawadogo_ls@hotmail.com
  • Savadogo, World Agroforestry Centre & International Crop Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRAF-ICRISAT), West and Central Africa Region-Sahel Node, BP 12404, Niamey, Niger ORCID ID:E-mail: savadogo.patrice@gmail.com
  • Aynekulu, World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), United Nations Avenue, P.O. Box 30677-00100, Nairobi, Kenya ORCID ID:E-mail: e.betemariam@cgiar.org
  • Heiskanen, University of Helsinki, Department of Geosciences and Geography, P.O. Box 68, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: janne.heiskanen@helsinki.fi
  • Saïd, International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI). P.O. Box 30709, Nairobi, Kenya ORCID ID:E-mail: m.said@cgiar.org
article id 964, category Research article
Liisa Huttunen, Matthew P. Ayres, Pekka Niemelä, Susanne Heiska, Riitta Tegelberg, Matti Rousi, Seppo Kellomäki. (2013). Interactive effects of defoliation and climate change on compensatory growth of silver birch seedlings. Silva Fennica vol. 47 no. 3 article id 964. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.964
Highlights: The main components affecting growth compensation in silver birch seedlings are the timing and severity of foliage damage; The ability to compensate growth is also dependent upon the limits of temperature and nutrient availability; The responses of birches imply that folivory does not necessarily lead to reduced net productivity under changing climate
Atmospheric warming increases the abundance of insect herbivores and intensifies the risk of defoliation, especially in high latitude forests. At the same time, the effects of increasing temperature and CO2 on plant responses to foliage damage are poorly understood. We examined if previous-year defoliation, varying between 0 and 75% of total leaf area, and different combinations of elevated temperature, CO2 and nutrient availability alter the growth of two-year old silver birch (Betula pendula Roth) seedlings. We measured the greatest height growth in seedlings that were fertilized and defoliated twice at the level of 50% of total leaf area, and subjected to elevated temperature with ambient CO2. The lowest growth was recorded in unfertilized seedlings that were defoliated twice at the level of 25% of total leaf area, and grew under ambient temperature with ambient CO2. The total biomass increased in all seedlings that were fertilized or grew under elevated temperature. The root: shoot ratios were low in defoliated seedlings, or seedlings subjected to fertilization or temperature elevation. Our conclusion is that ability of birches to compensate height growth is highly dependent upon the magnitude and frequency of defoliation on the limits of temperature and nutrient availability. These responses imply that folivory does not necessarily lead to reduced net productivity of trees under changing climate.
  • Huttunen, Section of Ecology, Department of Biology, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: liisa.huttunen@utu.fi (email)
  • Ayres, Biological Sciences, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755, USA ORCID ID:E-mail: matt.ayres@dartmouth.edu
  • Niemelä, Section of Biodiversity and Environmental Science, Department of Biology, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: pekka.niemela@utu.fi
  • Heiska, The Finnish Forest Research Institute, Punkaharju Unit, Finlandiantie 18, FI-58450 Punkaharju, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: susanne.heiska@metla.fi
  • Tegelberg, Digitarium - Digitization Centre of the Finnish Museum of Natural History and the University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu Science Park, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: riitta.tegelberg@helsinki.fi
  • Rousi, The Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa Unit, P.O. Box 18, FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: matti.rousi@metla.fi
  • Kellomäki, Faculty of Science and Forestry, School of Forest Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: seppo.kellomaki@uef.fi
article id 963, category Research article
Szymon Bijak, Michał Zasada, Agnieszka Bronisz, Karol Bronisz, Maciej Czajkowski, Łukasz Ludwisiak, Robert Tomusiak, Rafał Wojtan. (2013). Estimating coarse roots biomass in young silver birch stands on post-agricultural lands in central Poland. Silva Fennica vol. 47 no. 2 article id 963. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.963
Highlights: Age and size of the tree are the most important factors that influence the amount of belowground biomass; Allocation of the biomass to the coarse roots also depends on age and size of the tree
Study analyses coarse (d>2 mm of diameter) roots biomass dynamics in young succession stands of silver birch (Betula pendula Roth) growing on abandoned farmlands in central Poland. Research material based on 181 sample trees, which were gathered in 20 pure silver birch stands in 5 locations. The age of the trees varied from 1 to 16 years. Coarse roots biomass of the investigated trees ranged from 0.7 to 4305.5 g/tree (422.6 g/tree on average) showing great variability (coefficient of variation equals 185%). A clear dependence of belowground biomass on the age and size of a tree was observed. Root-to-shoot ratio values vary from 0.1 to 1.0 with evidence of a tendency to decrease with increasing age, diameter at the breast height and height of analysed trees. An allometric equation was elaborated for the estimation of belowground biomass based on height or diameter at breast height of young silver birches. The suitability of this formula should be considered for the estimation of biomass accumulation and carbon sequestration by young successional silver birch stands growing on abandoned agricultural lands.
  • Bijak, Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Faculty of Forestry, Laboratory of Dendrometry and Forest Productivity, Nowoursynowska 159, 02-776 Warszawa, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: szymon.bijak@wl.sggw.pl (email)
  • Zasada, Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Faculty of Forestry, Laboratory of Dendrometry and Forest Productivity, Nowoursynowska 159, 02-767 Warszawa, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: michal.zasada@wl.sggw.pl
  • Bronisz, Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Faculty of Forestry, Laboratory of Dendrometry and Forest Productivity, Warszawa, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: agnieszka.bronisz@wl.sggw.pl
  • Bronisz, Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Faculty of Forestry, Laboratory of Dendrometry and Forest Productivity, Warszawa, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: karol.bronisz@wl.sggw.pl
  • Czajkowski, Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Faculty of Forestry, Laboratory of Dendrometry and Forest Productivity, Warszawa, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: maciej.czajkowski@wl.sggw.pl
  • Ludwisiak, Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Faculty of Forestry, Laboratory of Dendrometry and Forest Productivity, Warszawa, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: lukasz.ludwisiak@wl.sggw.pl
  • Tomusiak, Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Faculty of Forestry, Laboratory of Dendrometry and Forest Productivity, Warszawa, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: robert.tomusiak@wl.sggw.pl
  • Wojtan, Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Faculty of Forestry, Laboratory of Dendrometry and Forest Productivity, Warszawa, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: rafal.wojtan@wl.sggw.pl
article id 28, category Research article
Lu-Min Vaario, Kim Yrjälä, Matti Rousi, Timo Sipilä, Pertti Pulkkinen. (2011). Leaf number indicates salt tolerance of young seedling families of European aspen (Populus tremula L.) growing in different soils. Silva Fennica vol. 45 no. 1 article id 28. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.28
Soil salinity limits plant productivity and quality. We evaluated the response of 12 aspen (Populus tremula) families to salt stress in two different soils irrigated for 4-weeks with 0, 80 or 160 mM saline solution. Easily measurable characteristics such as shoot height, leaf number, dry mass as well as the distribution of sodium (Na+) ions were measured in 5-month-old aspen seedlings raised in controlled greenhouse conditions on two different soils. Growth among families varied significantly, and the interaction between family and soil type was significant. From 2–5 months, leaf number correlated with that of the first month and salinity tolerance. Sodium ions varied significantly within plants and among families; seedlings that accumulated higher Na+ concentrations in root had more leaves and lower Na+ in shoot. These results suggest that leaf number indicates salt tolerance in young seedlings. Seedling performance was also affected by soil type, especially the root/shoot ratio, suggesting an interaction between salt tolerance and growth medium. This study has identified significant intra-specific variation in salt tolerance of aspen in 160 mM saline and highlighted the potential to select and develop a method for efficient pre-screening of trees to be used in the reclamation of salt-affected land.
  • Vaario, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa Research Unit, P. O. Box 18, FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: lu-min.vaario@metla.fi (email)
  • Yrjälä, MEM group, Department of Biosciences, P.O. Box 56, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Rousi, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa Research Unit, P. O. Box 18, FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: matti.rousi@metla.fi
  • Sipilä, Department of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 56, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Pulkkinen, Pulkkinen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Haapastensyrjä Research Unit, Haapastensyrjäntie 34, FI-12600 Läyliäinen, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: pertti.pulkkinen@metla.fi
article id 292, category Research article
Sanna Susiluoto, Frank Berninger. (2007). Interactions between morphological and physiological drought responses in Eucalyptus microtheca. Silva Fennica vol. 41 no. 2 article id 292. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.292
We studied the response of Eucalyptus microtheca to drought in a greenhouse experiment. As a result of the drought the growth of the seedlings decreased and allocation patterns changed so that allocation to the roots increased. However, changes in photosynthesis and stomatal conductance under drought were rather modest. We showed, using chlorophyll fluorescence and measurements of photosynthesis under high CO2 that the biochemical capacity of photosynthesis increased under drought. The results suggest that changes in root/shoot ratio are the primary reactions that initiate a series of compensatory reactions that mitigate the effects of drought in Eucalyptus microtheca.
  • Susiluoto, University of Helsinki, Department of Forest Ecology, PL 27, 00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: sannamaija.susiluoto@helsinki.fi (email)
  • Berninger, Departement des Sciences biologiques, Université du Québec à Montréal, CP 8888 Succ Centre Ville, Montreal, Canada ORCID ID:E-mail:

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