Current issue: 55(4)

Under compilation: 55(5)

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Articles containing the keyword 'teak'.

Category: Research article

article id 10309, category Research article
Petteri Seppänen, Antti Mäkinen. (2020). Comprehensive yield model for plantation teak in Panama. Silva Fennica vol. 54 no. 5 article id 10309. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.10309
Highlights: Tree level teak stem volume models, taper model and three sets of stand level yield models were developed using large empirical datasets; Tree volume models were satisfactorily validated against independent measurement data and other published models; Tree height as input parameter improved the stem volume model marginally; Stand level yield models produced comparable harvest volumes with models published in the literature; Stand level timber product outputs were found like actual harvests with an exception that the models marginally underestimate the share of logs in very large diameter classes.

The purpose of this study was to prepare a comprehensive, computerized teak (Tectona grandis L.f) plantation yield model system that can be used to describe the forest dynamics, predict growth and yield and support forest planning and decision-making. Extensive individual tree and permanent sample plot data were used to develop tree-level volume models, taper curve models and stand-level yield models for teak plantations in Panama. Tree volume models were satisfactorily validated against independent measurement data and other published models. Tree height as input parameter improved the stem volume model marginally. Stand level yield models produced comparable harvest volumes with models published in the literature. Stand level volume product outputs were found like actual harvests with an exception that the models marginally underestimate the share of logs in very large diameter classes. The kind of comprehensive model developed in this study and implemented in an easy to use software package provides a very powerful decision support tool. Optimal forest management regimes can be found by simulating different planting densities, thinning regimes and final harvest ages. Forest practitioners can apply growth and yield models in the appropriate stand level inventory data and perform long term harvest scheduling at property level or even at an entire timberland portfolio level. Harvest schedules can be optimized using the applicable financial parameters (silviculture costs, harvesting costs, wood prices and discount rates) and constraints (market size and operational capacity).

  • Seppänen, Verdas Oy, Kihlinkuja 7, FI-50600 Mikkeli, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: petteri@verdas.fi (email)
  • Mäkinen,  Simosol Oy. Hämeenkatu 10, FI-11100 Riihimäki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: antti.makinen@simosol.fi
article id 375, category Research article
Edgar Víquez, Diego Pérez. (2005). Effect of pruning on tree growth, yield, and wood properties of Tectona grandis plantations in Costa Rica. Silva Fennica vol. 39 no. 3 article id 375. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.375
Reduced plantation densities have the effect that obtaining natural pruning and stem straightness are less assured. The physiological process of self-pruning is replaced by manual pruning. Generally, plantations are denser and have more uniform spacing than natural forests. In many, if not most species, natural pruning is never a satisfactory option, even after branch senescence, if production of clear wood is a management objective. Natural pruning can only be considered on a species by species basis. This study reports on the first results of a pruning trial for Tectona grandis L.F. plantations in Costa Rica. The treatments consisted of pruning heights of 3.0, 4.0, and 5.0 meters, and the Control without pruning. Differences among treatments in DBH and total height were significant at 3.2, 5.2, and 6.1 years of age, but not at 7.3 years. Under an intensive pruning regime, a teak tree at rotation (20 years) may yield over 40% of knot-free volume (over 60% of the merchantable tree volume). Current findings open a scope for new management options, aiming at improving stem form and wood quality by means of an intensive pruning regime, without having a detrimental effect on tree growth and stand yield.
  • Víquez, Tropical Agricultural Research and Higher Education Center (CATIE), Apartado 7170 CATIE, Turrialba, Costa Rica ORCID ID:E-mail: eviquez@catie.ac.cr (email)
  • Pérez, Ambiente Tierra S.A., Apartado 733-2250, Tres Ríos, Cartago, Costa Rica ORCID ID:E-mail:

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