Current issue: 53(2)

Under compilation: 53(3)

Impact factor 1.683
5-year impact factor 1.950
Silva Fennica 1926-1997
1990-1997
1980-1989
1970-1979
1960-1969
Acta Forestalia Fennica
1953-1968
1933-1952
1913-1932

Articles containing the keyword 'valuable timber'.

Category: Research article

article id 1313, category Research article
Jonathan Sheppard, Christopher Morhart, Heinrich Spiecker. (2016). Bark surface temperature measurements on the boles of wild cherry (Prunus avium) grown within an agroforestry system. Silva Fennica vol. 50 no. 3 article id 1313. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1313
Highlights: Widely spaced trees within agroforestry systems are at risk of sun induced damages; Bark surface temperature on the south western bole face reached nearly 50 °C in summer and experienced a maximum range of 38 °C within a 24 hour period in spring; Maximum and minimum daily bark surface temperatures are modelled using climatic and solar position data; The application of white paint to stems reduces the bark surface temperature.

Growing Prunus avium L. within an agroforestry system (AFS) may result in sun damage to cambial tissues on sun-exposed bole faces. There are two periods of risk of damage caused by insolation to exposed tree boles, the summer, when cambial temperatures become too high, or during winter, when the frozen dormant cambium tissue thaws and then rapidly re-freezes, a phenomenon commonly referred to as sunscald or southwest disease. Damage on the south western bole face was observed on a number of P. avium within an AFS. Five trees were sampled to assess the period in time that damage occurred. To retrospectively investigate such damage, bark surface temperature data were collected over a two year period for a further five P. avium and analysed. It was shown that bark surface temperature on the south western bole face reached nearly 50 °C during summer and experienced a maximum range of 38 °C within a 24 hour period in spring. A specially formulated white paint was applied to two trees, thus, testing a method to reduce the risk of sun damage. Two models were constructed to predict maximum and minimum daily bark surface temperature using maximum, minimum and mean daily air temperature, daily sum of sunshine hours, cloud cover, wind speed, relative humidity, maximum solar elevation and height on the tree bole as predictor variables. The damage occurred during winter 2009/2010. The models were used to identify maximum and minimum bark surface temperatures during that winter enabling the identification of possible damage events.

  • Sheppard, Chair of Forest Growth and Dendroecology, Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Tennenbacher Straße 4, 79106 Freiburg, Germany ORCID ID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-4959-7069 E-mail: jonathan.sheppard@iww.uni-freiburg.de (email)
  • Morhart, Chair of Forest Growth and Dendroecology, Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Tennenbacher Straße 4, 79106 Freiburg, Germany ORCID ID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-1874-5011 E-mail: christopher.morhart@iww.uni-freiburg.de
  • Spiecker, Chair of Forest Growth and Dendroecology, Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Tennenbacher Straße 4, 79106 Freiburg, Germany ORCID ID:E-mail: instww@uni-freiburg.de

Category: Article

article id 4659, category Article
P. Piepponen. (1957). Arvo- ja rakennuspuiden merkitseminen asutustilojen metsissä. Silva Fennica no. 92 article id 4659. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a14060
English title: Marking of construction and other valuable timber in the forests of settlement farms.

Silva Fennica Issue 92 includes presentations held in 1956 in the 8th professional development courses, arranged for forest officers working in the Forest Service. The presentations focus on practical issues in forest management and administration, especially in regional level. The education was arranged by Forest Service.

Fellings of valuable timber in the forests to be surrendered for settlement farms have been discussed widely in Finland. This presentation describes the effects of the new section in the Land Settlement Decree and new directions given by Central Forestry Association Tapio based on the decree. According to the directions, the fellings have to follow legislation concerning other fellings in private forests. The felling of all large, valuable timber, as has previously been the custom in settlement farm forests, does not follow this principle.

  • Piepponen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 4658, category Article
Olavi Hyttinen. (1957). Asutustilojen arvopuukysymyksestä. Silva Fennica no. 92 article id 4658. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a14059
English title: Valuable timber trees on settlement farms.

Silva Fennica Issue 92 includes presentations held in 1956 in the 8th professional development courses, arranged for forest officers working in the Forest Service. The presentations focus on practical issues in forest management and administration, especially in regional level. The education was arranged by Forest Service.

When resettlement plots have been established in Finland, a so-called household wood principle used to be used: in addition to fields, the new farm has been given forest land enough to supply it household timber. Trees larger than needed for construction of the farm were considered unnecessary, and the valuable timber trees over certain diameter could be harvested by the surrenderer of the land. This has led to fellings at minimum diameter in contrary to rational forest management. The presentation describes new legislation and directions that aim at correcting the situation.

  • Hyttinen, ORCID ID:E-mail:

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