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Silva Fennica vol. 34 | 2000

Category: Research article

article id 623, category Research article
Anders Roos, Matti Flinkman, Armas Jäppinen & Mats Warensjö. (2000). Adoption of value-adding processes in Swedish sawmills. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 4 article id 623. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.623
Adding value to lumber by processing it after sawing and standard drying is one means for the sawmilling industry to increase market shares in competition with other materials, e.g. glass, steel, concrete, aluminium, and plastics. In this study the adoption patterns of value-adding processes used in Swedish softwood sawmills were analysed based on production data from 1995. About 90% of the sawmills applied a value-adding process after initial sawing and drying, and 72% of the sawmills applied two or more processes. The total share of processed sawnwood was about 40%. Important dimensions of value-adding processes are: extra drying and production of blanks for doors/windows and for furniture; surface-treatment, mainly planing, which is sometimes associated with preservation and painting; length trimming and pallet production; extra drying and production of edge-glued panels and laminated beams; and stress grading and production of building components. The association of different value-adding dimensions with location, ownership and production characteristics were investigated. The total share of value-added production were higher for private sawmills than for mills owned by forest companies or by forest owners’ associations, and it was higher for mills in southern Sweden than for sawmills in other parts of the country. Value-added share does not clearly correlate with mill size or with the dominating tree species being sawn.
  • Roos, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Forest Management and Products, P.O. Box 7060, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: anders.roos@sh.slu.se (email)
  • Flinkman, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Forest Management and Products, P.O. Box 7060, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Jäppinen, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Forest Management and Products, P.O. Box 7060, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Warensjö, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Forest Management and Products, P.O. Box 7060, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 622, category Research article
Håkan Lindström. (2000). Intra-tree models of basic density in Norway spruce as an input to simulation software. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 4 article id 622. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.622
Basic density is said to influence aspects of conversion, properties, and end-use of forest products. Consequently, it is argued that accurate models of basic density variation, within and between trees, could be used to improve the utilisation of wood as an industrial raw material. The objective of the present study was to develop basic density models based on Norway spruce trees, that could be used within a model system for conversion simulation studies. Nineteen stands of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) were selected throughout Sweden. Based on dbh, two small, two moderate, and two large timber trees were taken from each stand. Dbh varied between 180–470 mm, tree height between 17–34 m, and total age between 51–152 years. Each selected tree was cross-cut into logs; discs were prepared from the butt end of each log and from the top end of the top log. Computed tomography scanning and image analysis were used to determine basic density and growth ring development on sampled discs. Basic density development in 20-mm segments from pith outwards was modelled in models based on ring width, tree and growth condition data. The resulting models had an adjusted R2 of 0.37–0.51 and a RMSE of 37–41 kg/m3.
  • Lindström, University of Canterbury, School of Forestry, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand ORCID ID:E-mail: lindstromhakan@netscape.net (email)
article id 621, category Research article
Jyrki Kangas, Pekka Leskinen & Timo Pukkala. (2000). Integrating timber price scenario modeling with tactical management planning of private forestry at forest holding level. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 4 article id 621. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.621
In forest management planning, deterministic timber prices are typically assumed. However, real-life timber prices vary in the course of time, and also price peaks, i.e. exceptionally high timber prices, might occur. If land-owners can utilise the price variation by selling timber with the high prices, they are able to increase their net revenues correspondingly. In this study, an approach is presented to study the timber price variation and its significance in the optimization of forest management. The approach utilizes stochastic timber price scenario modelling, simulation of forest development, and optimization of forest management. The approach is presented and illustrated by means of a case study. It is shown how the degree of uncertainty due to variation in timber prices can be analyzed in tactical forest planning of private forestry, and how the potential benefits of adaptive timber-selling behaviour for a forest landowner can be computed by using the approach. The effects of stochastic timber prices on the choice of forest plan are studied at the forest holding level considering also the spacing and type of cuttings and the optimal cutting order. A forest plan prepared under the assumption of constant timber price very seldom results in optimal forest management. Through studying the effects of stochastic timber prices, forest landowners and other decision makers obtain valuable information about the significance of adaptive timber selling behaviour. The presented methodology can also be used in analysing the land-owners’ economic risks as a function of time-price structure.
  • Kangas, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Kannus Research Station, P.O. Box 44, FIN-69101 Kannus, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: jyrki.kangas@metla.fi (email)
  • Leskinen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Kannus Research Station, P.O. Box 44, FIN-69101 Kannus, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Pukkala, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forestry, P.O. Box 111, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 620, category Research article
Annika Kangas & Matti Maltamo. (2000). Performance of percentile based diameter distribution prediction and Weibull method in independent data sets. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 4 article id 620. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.620
Diameter distribution is used in most forest management planning packages for predicting stand volume, timber volume and stand growth. The prediction of diameter distribution can be based on parametric distribution functions, distribution-free parametric prediction methods or purely non-parametric methods. In the first case, the distribution is obtained by predicting the parameters of some probability density function. In a distribution-free percentile method, the diameters at certain percentiles of the distribution are predicted with models. In non-parametric methods, the predicted distribution is a linear combination of similar measured stands. In this study, the percentile based diameter distribution is compared to the results obtained with the Weibull method in four independent data sets. In the case of Scots pine, the other methods are also compared to k-nearest neighbour method. The comparison was made with respect to the accuracy of predicted stand volume, saw timber volume and number of stems. The predicted percentile and Weibull distributions were calibrated using number of stems measured from the stand. The information of minimum and maximum diameters were also used, for re-scaling the percentile based distribution or for parameter recovery of Weibull parameters. The accuracy of the predicted stand characteristics were also compared for calibrated distributions. The most reliable results were obtained using the percentile method with the model set including number of stems as a predictor. Calibration improved the results in most cases. However, using the minimum and maximum diameters for parameter recovery proved to be inefficient.
  • Kangas, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Kannus Research Station, P.O. Box 44, FIN-69101 Kannus, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: annika.kangas@metla.fi (email)
  • Maltamo, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu Research Station, P.O. Box 68, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 619, category Research article
Annika Kangas & Matti Maltamo. (2000). Percentile based basal area diameter distribution models for Scots pine, Norway spruce and birch species. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 4 article id 619. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.619
Information about diameter distribution is used for predicting stand total volume, timber volume and stand growth for forest management planning. Often, the diameter distribution is obtained by predicting the parameters of some probability density function, using means and sums of tree characters as predictors. However, the results have not always been satisfactory: the predicted distributions practically always have a similar shape. Also, multimodal distributions cannot be obtained. However, diameter distribution can also be predicted using distribution-free methods. In the percentile method, the diameters at certain percentiles of the distribution are predicted with models. The empirical diameter distribution function is then obtained by interpolating between the predicted diameters. In this paper, models for diameters at 12 percentiles of stand basal area are presented for Scots pine, Norway spruce and birch species. Two sets of models are estimated: a set with and one without number of stems as a predictor. Including the number of stems as a predictor improved the volume and saw timber volume estimates for all species, but the improvements were especially high for number of stems estimates obtained from the predicted distribution. The use of number of stems as predictor in models is based on the possibility of including this characteristic to measured stand variables.
  • Kangas, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Kannus Research Station, P.O. Box 44, FIN-69101 Kannus, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: annika.kangas@metla.fi (email)
  • Maltamo, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu Research Station, P.O. Box 68, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 618, category Research article
Steen Magnussen, Paul Boudewyn, Mike Wulder & David Seemann. (2000). Predictions of forest inventory cover type proportions using Landsat TM. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 4 article id 618. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.618
The feasibility of generating via Landsat TM data current estimates of cover type proportions for areas lacking this information in the national forest inventory was explored by a case study in New Brunswick. A recent forest management inventory covering 4196 km2 in south-eastern New Brunswick (the test area) and a coregistered Landsat TM scene was used to develop predictive models of 12 cover type proportions in an adjacent 4525 km2 region (the validation area). Four prediction models were considered, one using a maximum likelihood classifier (MLC), and three using the proportions of 30 TM clusters as predictors. The MLC was superior for non-vegetated cover types while a neural net or a prorating of cluster proportions was chosen for predicting vegetated cover types. Most predictions generated for national inventory photo-plots of 2 x 2 km were closer to the most recent inventory results than estimates extrapolated from the test area. Agreement between predictions and current inventory results varied considerably among cover types with model-based predictions outperforming, on average, the simple spatial extensions by about 14%. In this region, an 11-year-old forest inventory for the validation area provided estimates that in half the cases were closer to current inventory estimates than predictions using the optimal Landsat TM model. A strong temporal correlation of photo-plot-level cover type proportions made old-values more consistent than predictions using the optimal Landsat TM model in all but three cases. Prorating of cluster proportions holds promise for large-scale multi-sensor predictions of forest inventory cover types.
  • Magnussen, Canadian Forest Service, 506 West Burnside Road, Victoria B.C., Canada V8Z 1M5 ORCID ID:E-mail: smagnussen@pfc.forestry.ca (email)
  • Boudewyn, Canadian Forest Service, 506 West Burnside Road, Victoria B.C., Canada V8Z 1M5 ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Wulder, Canadian Forest Service, 506 West Burnside Road, Victoria B.C., Canada V8Z 1M5 ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Seemann, Canadian Forest Service, 506 West Burnside Road, Victoria B.C., Canada V8Z 1M5 ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 617, category Research article
Jouni Siipilehto. (2000). A comparison of two parameter prediction methods for stand structure in Finland. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 4 article id 617. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.617
The objective of this paper was to predict a model for describing stand structure of tree heights (h) and diameters at breast height (dbh). The research material consisted of data collected from 64 stands of Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst.) and 91 stands of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) located in southern Finland. Both stand types contained birch (Betula pendula Roth and B. pubescent Ehrh.) admixtures. The traditional univariate approach (Model I) of using the dbh distribution (Johnson’s SB) together with a height curve (Näslund’s function) was compared against the bivariate approaches, Johnson’s SBB distribution (Model II) and Model Ie. In Model Ie within-dbh-class h-variation was included by transforming a normally distributed homogenous error of linearized Näslund’s function to concern real heights. Basal-area-weighted distributions were estimated using the maximum likelihood (ML) method. Species-specific prediction models were derived using linear regression analysis. The models were compared with Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests for marginal distributions, accuracy of stand variables and the dbh-h relationship of individual trees. The differences in the stand characteristics between the models were marginal. Model I gave a slightly better fit for spruce, but Model II was better for pine stands. The univariate Model I resulted in clearly too narrow marginal h-distribution for pine. It is recommended applying of a constrained ML method for reasonable dbh-h relationship instead of using a pure ML method when fitting the SBB model.
  • Siipilehto, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa Research Centre, P.O. Box 18, FIN-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: jouni.siipilehto@metla.fi (email)
article id 616, category Research article
Markus Lindholm, Hannu Lehtonen, Taneli Kolström, Jouko Meriläinen, Matti Eronen & Mauri Timonen. (2000). Climatic signals extracted from ring-width chronologies of Scots pines from the northern, middle and southern parts of the boreal forest belt in Finland. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 4 article id 616. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.616
Climatic signals were extracted from ring-width chronologies of Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris L.) from natural stands of the northern, middle, and southern parts of the boreal forest belt in Finland. The strength of the common growth signals (forcing factors) were quantified as a function of time. This was achieved by mean inter-series correlations, calculated over a moving 30-year window, both within and between the regional chronologies. Strong regional signals and also evidence for common forcings were found, especially between northern and central, central and eastern, as well as central/eastern and southern chronologies. Response function analyses revealed that growing season temperatures govern the growth rates of northern pines, while towards south, pine growth becomes less affected by temperatures, and more affected by e.g. precipitation. During some periods, growing conditions seem to have been favorable in the south, while they have been unfavorable in the north (growth inversions). Going from the north to the south, the variability of radial growth clearly decreases, and the variance of ring-width series becomes smaller. Growth variability in the four regions was compared during the common interval of the chronologies, from 1806 to 1991. The spectral densities of the northern, central, eastern and southern chronologies were also compared as functions of frequency, viz. cycles per year. The variance is much greater and there is more periodic behavior in the north than in the south in high, medium, as well as lower frequencies.
  • Lindholm, Saima Centre for Environmental Sciences, University of Joensuu, Linnankatu 11, FIN-57130 Savonlinna, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Lehtonen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu Research Station, Box 68, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kolström, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu Research Station, Box 68, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Meriläinen, Saima Centre for Environmental Sciences, University of Joensuu, Linnankatu 11, FIN-57130 Savonlinna, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Eronen, Department of Geology, Division of Geology and Palaeontology, Box 11, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Timonen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Rovaniemi Research Station, Box 16, FIN-96301 Rovaniemi, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 630, category Research article
S. Samarasinghe & G. D. Kulasiri. (2000). Displacement fields of wood in tension based on image processing: Part 2. Crack-tip displacements in mode-I and mixed-mode fracture. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 3 article id 630. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.630
Near tip displacement fields for tensile loaded cracked rubber and wood with a crack parallel-, perpendicular-to-grain, and a parallel-to-grain crack inclined 30°, 45°, and 60° to the load axis were obtained from digital image correlation (DIC). Theoretical displacements were also obtained for rubber and wood using isotropic and orthotropic fracture theory, respectively. The results showed that DIC can reveal fine details of the nature of displacements and the influences of crack tip in both rubber and wood. Experimental crack tip displacements for wood compare well with theory; particularly, when load is perpendicular-to-grain. Some anomalies were found in the tip displacements in the direction of the tracheids due to the unique nature of their behaviour not accounted for by theory. Mixed-mode crack tip displacement fields for wood clearly showed the increasing influence of crack angle on the displacements, and the displacements perpendicular to crack compared very well with theory. The displacements parallel to crack showed some variations owing to the involvement of tracheids.
  • Samarasinghe, Lincoln University, Appl. Computing, Mathematics and Statistics Group, P.O. Box 84, Canterbury, New Zealand ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kulasiri, Lincoln University, Appl. Computing, Mathematics and Statistics Group, P.O. Box 84, Canterbury, New Zealand ORCID ID:E-mail: kulasird@tui.lincoln.ac.nz (email)
article id 629, category Research article
S. Samarasinghe & G. D. Kulasiri. (2000). Displacement fields of wood in tension based on image processing: Part 1. Tension parallel- and perpendicular- to grain and comparisons with isotropic behaviour. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 3 article id 629. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.629
Displacement fields for tensile loaded rubber and wood in parallel- and perpendicular-to-grain were obtained from digital image correlation. The results showed that the digital image correlation can reveal fine details of the nature of displacements in both rubber and wood. It was found that when load is perpendicular-to-grain, the lignin matrix produces uniform displacement fields similar to that of isotropic rubber. Uniform displacement fields also observed when lignin is involved in contraction due to Poisson effect in parallel-to-grain tension. However, when tracheids carry the load in parallel-to-grain loading, or are compressed in perpendicular-to-grain loading, a complex displacement pattern distorted by internal shear stress and slippage is produced.
  • Samarasinghe, Lincoln University, Appl. Computing, Mathematics and Statistics Group, P.O. Box 84, Canterbury, New Zealand ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kulasiri, Lincoln University, Appl. Computing, Mathematics and Statistics Group, P.O. Box 84, Canterbury, New Zealand ORCID ID:E-mail: kulasird@tui.lincoln.ac.nz (email)
article id 628, category Research article
Stefan Daume & Dave Robertson. (2000). A heuristic approach to modelling thinnings. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 3 article id 628. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.628
Thinnings play an important role in guiding forest development and are considered by many to be the most important influence on forests in Central Europe. Due to their importance, thinning models are a major part of any forest growth model for managed forests. Existing thinning model approaches have a number of problems associated with structure and model development that weaken their reliability and accuracy. To overcome some of these problems this paper proposes a heuristic approach to modelling thinnings, where the focus is on distance-dependent, single-tree models. This alternative approach tries to capture the information, strategies and deductive processes likely to be employed by a forester deciding on the removal of individual trees in a stand. Use of heuristics to represent thinning knowledge simplifies the construction and refinement of a thinning model and increases its plausibility. The representation of thinning heuristics in Prolog – a programming language based on formal logic – is a straightforward process without losing expressiveness of the original heuristics. Limited tests of the model implemented in Prolog indicate that the proposed model outperforms its competitors.
  • Daume, The University of Edinburgh, Institute for Representation and Reasoning, Division of Informatics, 80 South Bridge, Edinburgh EH1 1HN, United Kingdom ORCID ID:E-mail: stefand@dai.ed.ac.uk (email)
  • Robertson, The University of Edinburgh, Institute for Representation and Reasoning, Division of Informatics, 80 South Bridge, Edinburgh EH1 1HN, United Kingdom ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 627, category Research article
Joseph Buongiorno, Audra Kolbe & Mike Vasievich. (2000). Economic and ecological effects of diameter-limit and BDq management regimes: simulation results for northern hardwoods. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 3 article id 627. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.627
The long-term financial and ecological effects of diameter-limit regimes and basal-area-diameter-q-ratio (BDq) regimes were compared by simulation in the case of northern hardwood forests. Varying the cutting cycle between 10 and 20 years had little effect on returns or stand structure. A 28-cm diameter-limit cut gave the highest production and financial returns, and the highest species diversity, but considerably lower size diversity. A 38-cm diameter-limit cut and a heavy BDq selection harvest gave high returns, while maintaining high levels of diversity. On lands of equal site quality, Michigan’s stands were more productive than Wisconsin’s. The results suggest that it is possible to manage northern hardwood stands sustainably with diameter-limit cuts, combined with removal of poorly performing understory trees. Adjusting the diameter limit gave rise to stands similar in productivity and structure to those obtained by BDq cutting regimes. Given their simplicity of implementation and monitoring, more attention should be given to diameter-limit cutting regimes, with attendant stand improvement measures, as a practical means for uneven-aged management of northern hardwoods.
  • Buongiorno, Department of Forest Ecology and Management, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1630 Linden Drive, Madison, WI 53705, USA ORCID ID:E-mail: Jbuongio@facstaff.wisc.edu (email)
  • Kolbe, Department of Forest Ecology and Management, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1630 Linden Drive, Madison, WI 53705, USA ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Vasievich, USDA Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station, 1407 S. Harrison Road, Suite 220, East Lansing, MI 48823, USA ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 626, category Research article
Teijo Nikkanen & Seppo Ruotsalainen. (2000). Variation in flowering abundance and its impact on the genetic diversity of the seed crop in a Norway spruce seed orchard. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 3 article id 626. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.626
The variation in flowering abundance was studied in a Norway spruce seed orchard, located in southern Finland (62°13'N, 25°24'E), consisting of 67 clones from northern Finland (64°–67°N). The flowering variation in 1984–1996 was studied at the annual, clonal and graft level. In addition, the genetic diversity of an imaginary seed crop was estimated using a concept of status number. The between-year variation was large in both female and male flowering. Differences in flowering abundance among the clones were large and statistically significant in all the years studied. The average broad-sense heritability values for female and male flowering were 0.37 and 0.38, respectively, but varied considerably from year to year. The correlations between the flowering abundance of the clones in different years were usually positive and significant. However, the correlations for two pairs of successive good flowering years showed that the same clones usually flowered well in the first year in both pairs of years, and the other clones in the second year. The clonal differences in flowering could not be explained by geographic origin, but were more dependent on the graft size. Our results demonstrate that the variation in the ramet number, flowering abundance and pollen contamination must be included when estimating the genetic diversity of the seed crop in a seed orchard. The relative status number of the seed orchard was 84% of the number of clones when the variation in the ramet number was included. The relative status numbers after adjusting for the variation in female and male flowering were on the average 46 and 55%, respectively, and 59% when adjusting for both genders together. Pollen contamination increased the status number considerably.
  • Nikkanen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Punkaharju Research Station, FIN-58450 Punkaharju, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: teijo.nikkanen@metla.fi (email)
  • Ruotsalainen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Punkaharju Research Station, FIN-58450 Punkaharju, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 625, category Research article
Hans-Örjan Nohrstedt. (2000). Effects of soil scarification and previous N fertilisation on pools of inorganic N in soil after clear-felling of a Pinus sylvestris (L.) stand. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 3 article id 625. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.625
Previous analyses of soil water beneath mounds resulting from scarification have implied that this forestry measure increases leaching of inorganic N. However, more recent soil-water studies have not confirmed this assumption. The soil study presented here examined the pools of inorganic N in different microsites emanating from a simulated disc trenching, i. e. the mound with underlying soil, the furrow bottom and the undisturbed soil. The study was made five years after scarification. The mound itself with underlying soil had a larger pool of inorganic N than the undisturbed soil. This was mainly because of an increase in the embedded humus layer, thus implying a larger net N mineralisation and/or lower losses. However, when pools of inorganic N per hectare were calculated, taking into consideration that a scarified area comprises 25% mounds, 25% furrows and 50% undisturbed soil, there was no increase in pools of inorganic N when compared with an area not subjected to scarification. This observation supports the finding of the more recent soil-water studies mentioned, i. e., that leaching seems not to be influenced by soil scarification. The scarification was made as a split-plot treatment on main-plots in an old experiment with different N doses. Thus, the effect of the previous N fertilisation could also be evaluated. Two N doses were tested beside the unfertilised control: 720N (3 x 240 kg N ha–1 yr–1) and 1800N (3 x 600 kg N ha–1 yr–1). The last fertiliser application was made six years before the clearcutting and 13 years before the soil sampling. The previously fertilised main-plots had larger pools of inorganic N than the control plots.
  • Nohrstedt, The Forestry Research Institute of Sweden, Uppsala Science Park, SE-751 83 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: hans-orjan.nohrstedt@skogforsk.se (email)
article id 638, category Research article
Gert-Jan Nabuurs, Mart-Jan Schelhaas & Ari Pussinen. (2000). Validation of the European Forest Information Scenario Model (EFISCEN) and a projection of Finnish forests. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 2 article id 638. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.638
Large-scale forest scenario models are intensively used to make projections of forest areas of up to hundreds of millions of hectares. Within Europe, such projections have been done for 11 countries at the individual national scale, most often to foresee the long-term implications of the ongoing forest management. However, the validity of the models has rarely been tested. The aim of this study was 1. to validate the European Forest Information SCENario model (EFISCEN) by running it on historic Finnish forest inventory data, 2. to improve the model based on the validation, and 3. to project the Finnish forest development till 2050 with the improved model under alternative scenarios. The results of the validation showed that EFISCEN is capable of making reliable large-scale projections of forest resources for periods up to 50–60 years. Based on the validation, the model was improved concerning simulation of age development, thinning regimes and regrowth after thinning. The projection of the Finnish forests till 2050 with the improved model presented a maximum sustainable felling level of around 70 million m3 per year. That provides an average growing stock of 106 m3 ha–1 in 2050 and a net annual increment of 3.6 m3 ha–1 y–1. If the current trend towards more nature oriented forest management continues and 1.39 million ha of forests have been set aside additionally for nature reserves by 2050, the felling level could meet a realistic demand of 57 million m3 per year in 2050. Under the latter regime the average growing stock will have grown to 160 m3 ha–1 in 2050.
  • Nabuurs, European Forest Institute (EFI), Torikatu 34, FIN-80100 Joensuu, Finland; Wageningen University and Research Center, ALTERRA, P.O. Box 47, NL 6700 AA Wageningen, The Netherlands ORCID ID:E-mail: g.j.nabuurs@alterra.wag-ur.nl (email)
  • Schelhaas, European Forest Institute (EFI), Torikatu 34, FIN-80100 Joensuu, Finland; Wageningen University and Research Center, ALTERRA, P.O. Box 47, NL 6700 AA Wageningen, The Netherlands ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Pussinen, European Forest Institute (EFI), Torikatu 34, FIN-80100 Joensuu, Finland; Wageningen University and Research Center, ALTERRA, P.O. Box 47, NL 6700 AA Wageningen, The Netherlands ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 637, category Research article
Hirofumi Kuboyama & Hiroyasu Oka. (2000). Climate risks and age-related damage probabilities – effects on the economically optimal rotation length for forest stand management in Japan. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 2 article id 637. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.637
We estimated the damage probability according to age class and major climatic disasters based on ‘Statistical Yearbook of National Forest Insurance’ from 1960 to 1996. The probability of snow damage is high for young stands, then gradually decreases with age. On the other hand, the risk of wind damage gradually increases with age. Decisions about rotation age should be based on the distribution of damage probability with stand age. Risk of damage has two contradictory effects on the optimal rotation period; one is that the rotation-shortening effect caused by risk of damage around harvest age; another is the rotation-extending effect due to decrease of rent by the risk of damage through the raising period. Change of optimal rotation depends on the relative magnitude of these effects. We examine this by calculating land expectation value (LEV) using a simulation model with the empirical damage probability, price and cost. Change of the optimal rotation period obtained from the national average damage probability is not significant. However, the optimal rotation is shorter in high wind risk areas and is longer in high snow risk areas. It is because the damage probability for a mature stand is high in the case of wind and low in the case of snow. In addition, the extent of decrease in LEV is smaller for wind than for snow. The results of simulation based on empirical data confirm that the optimal rotation period can become either shorter or longer through incorporating risk in decision making, depending on the damage probability distribution with stand age.
  • Kuboyama, Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute Tohoku Center, Nabeyashiki 72, Shimo-Kuriyagawa, Morioka, Iwate, 020-0123 Japan ORCID ID:E-mail: kuboyama@ffpri-thk.affrc.go.jp (email)
  • Oka, Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute Tohoku Center, Nabeyashiki 72, Shimo-Kuriyagawa, Morioka, Iwate, 020-0123 Japan ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 636, category Research article
Tuula Nuutinen, Hannu Hirvelä, Jari Hynynen, Kari Härkönen, Hannu Hökkä, Kari T. Korhonen & Olli Salminen. (2000). The role of peatlands in Finnish wood production – an analysis based on large-scale forest scenario modelling. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 2 article id 636. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.636
Using the Finnish MELA model, a set of scenarios were produced and used to map the possibilities and risks surrounding the utilisation of peatlands in wood production in Finland. One of the scenarios was an estimate of allowable-cut calculated by maximising the net present value of the future revenues using a four per cent interest rate subject to non-decreasing flow of wood, saw logs and net income over a 50-year period, and net present value after the 50 year period greater or equal than in the beginning. The estimate for maximum regionally sustained removal in 1996–2005 was 68 million m3 per year – approaching 74 million m3 during the next decades. In this scenario, 14 per cent of all cuttings during the period 1996–2005 would be made on peatlands, which comprise ca. 31 per cent of the total area of forestry land. By the year 2025, the proportion of peatland cuttings would increase to over 20 per cent. The increase in future cutting possibilities on peatlands compensated for a temporary decrease in cuttings and growing stock on mineral soils. The allowable-cut effect was especially pronounced in northern Finland, where peatlands play an important role in wood production. In addition, the sensitivity of cutting possibilities for assumptions related to growth and price were analysed. The estimate of maximum sustainable yield as defined here seems to be fairly robust on the whole, except in northern Finland where the cutting scenarios were sensitive to the changes in the price of birch pulpwood. The proportion of peatland stands that are profitable for timber production depends on the interest rate: the higher the rate of interest the less peatland stands are thinned. The effect of cutting profile on future logging conditions and resulting costs were analysed in two forestry centres. If clear cuttings on mineral soils are to be cut first, an increase in future logging costs is inevitable.
  • Nuutinen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu Research Station, P.O. Box 68, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: tuula.nuutinen@metla.fi (email)
  • Hirvelä, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu Research Station, P.O. Box 68, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Hynynen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu Research Station, P.O. Box 68, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Härkönen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu Research Station, P.O. Box 68, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Hökkä, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu Research Station, P.O. Box 68, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Korhonen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu Research Station, P.O. Box 68, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Salminen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu Research Station, P.O. Box 68, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 635, category Research article
Manfred J. Lexer, Karl Hönninger, Helfried Scheifinger, Christoph Matulla, Nikolaus Groll & Helga Kromp-Kolb. (2000). The sensitivity of central European mountain forests to scenarios of climatic change: methodological frame for a large-scale risk assessment. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 2 article id 635. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.635
The methodological framework of a large-scale risk assessment for Austrian forests under scenarios of climatic change is presented. A recently developed 3D-patch model is initialized with ground-true soil and vegetation data from sample plots of the Austrian Forest Inventory (AFI). Temperature and precipitation data of the current climate are interpolated from a network of more than 600 weather stations to the sample plots of the AFI. Vegetation development is simulated under current climate (‘control run’) and under climate change scenarios starting from today's forest composition and structure. Similarity of species composition and accumulated biomass between these two runs at various points in time were used as assessment criteria. An additive preference function which is based on Saaty’s AHP is employed to synthesize these criteria to an overall index of the adaptation potential of current forests to a changing climate. The presented methodology is demonstrated for a small sample from the Austrian Forest Inventory. The forest model successfully simulated equilibrium species composition under current climatic conditions spatially explicit in a heterogenous landscape based on ground-true data. At none of the simulated sites an abrupt forest dieback did occur due to climate change impacts. However, substantial changes occured with regard to species composition of the potential natural vegetation (PNV).
  • Lexer, Institute of Silviculture, University of Agricultural Sciences, Peter-Jordanstrasse 70, A-1190 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail: lexer@edv1.boku.ac.at (email)
  • Hönninger, Institute of Silviculture, University of Agricultural Sciences, Peter-Jordanstrasse 70, A-1190 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Scheifinger, Institute of Meteorology and Physics, University of Agricultural Sciences, Türkenschanzstrasse 18, A-1180 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Matulla, Institute of Meteorology and Physics, University of Agricultural Sciences, Türkenschanzstrasse 18, A-1180 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Groll, Institute of Meteorology and Physics, University of Agricultural Sciences, Türkenschanzstrasse 18, A-1180 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kromp-Kolb, Institute of Meteorology and Physics, University of Agricultural Sciences, Türkenschanzstrasse 18, A-1180 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 634, category Research article
Marcus Lindner, Petra Lasch & Markus Erhard. (2000). Alternative forest management strategies under climatic change – prospects for gap model applications in risk analyses. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 2 article id 634. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.634
The projected global climate change will influence growth and productivity of natural and managed forests. Since the characteristics of the future regional climate are still uncertain and the response of our forests to changes in the atmospheric and climatic conditions may be both positive or negative, decision making in managed forests should consider the new risks and uncertainties arising from climatic change, especially if the rotation periods are long. An extended version of the forest gap model FORSKA was applied to simulate the forest development at 488 forest inventory plots in the federal state of Brandenburg, Germany, under two climate and three management scenarios. The transient growth dynamics from 1990 to 2100 were investigated at four sites in different parts of the state, representing the variability of environmental and forest conditions within Brandenburg. The alternative management strategies led to distinct differences in forest composition after 110 years of simulation. The projected climate change affected both forest productivity and species composition. The impacts of alternative management scenarios are discussed. It is concluded that the extended forest gap model can be a valuable tool to support decision making in forest management under global change.
  • Lindner, Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, P.O. Box 60 12 03, D-14412 Potsdam, Germany ORCID ID:E-mail: lindner@pik-potsdam.de (email)
  • Lasch, Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, P.O. Box 60 12 03, D-14412 Potsdam, Germany ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Erhard, Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, P.O. Box 60 12 03, D-14412 Potsdam, Germany ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 633, category Research article
Tron Eid. (2000). Use of uncertain inventory data in forestry scenario models and consequential incorrect harvest decisions. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 2 article id 633. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.633
Uncertainty in long-term timber production analyses usually focus success of regeneration, growth/mortality of trees and future fluctuations of timber prices/harvest costs, while uncertainty related to inventory data is paid less attention. At the same time, evaluations of inventory methods usually stop when the error level is stated, while the uncertainty accompanied by using the data is seldom considered. The present work addresses uncertain inventory data in long-term timber production analyses. Final harvest decisions, i.e. possible outcome intervals with respect to timing and expected net present value-losses due to incorrect timing, were considered. A case study was presented where inventory data errors according to different error levels were generated randomly. The selected error levels were based on observations from practical forest inventories in Norway. The analysis tool was GAYA-JLP. The impact of errors on decisions was derived through repeated computations of management strategies maximising net present value without harvest path constraints. A real rate of discount of 3% and an error level of 15% resulted in expected net present value-losses of 1 NOK ha–1 for basal area, 63 NOK ha–1 for mean height, 210 NOK ha–1 for site quality, 240 NOK ha–1 for stand age, and 499 NOK ha–1 when random errors occurred simultaneously for all these variables. The expected net present value-losses varied considerably. The largest losses appeared for stands with ages around optimal economical rotation ages. The losses were also relatively large for young stands, while they were relatively low for overmature stands. The experiences from the case study along with considerations related to other sources of uncertainty may help us to get a more realistic attitude to the reliability of long-term timber production analyses. The results of the study may also serve as a starting point in a decision oriented inventory planning concept, in which alternatives for inventory design and intensity are based on considerations with respect to inventory costs as well as net present value-losses.
  • Eid, Department of Forest Sciences, Agricultural University of Norway, P.O. Box 5044, N-1432 Ås, Norway ORCID ID:E-mail: tron.eid@isf.nlh.no (email)
article id 645, category Research article
Veli-Pekka Heikkinen & Antti Kanto. (2000). Market model with long-term effects – empirical evidence from Finnish forestry returns. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 1 article id 645. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.645
The aim of the study is to reformulate the conventional market model by considering also long-run characteristics of forestry returns. Finnish stumpage prices and the stock market index are found co-integrated. Co-integration relationship between timber and stock market indicates that there are factors in timber market like high transaction costs, illiquidity or temporal lack of information, and in the Finnish case, price recommendations that are priced by market. The presence of long-run effects may make the short-term market model mis-specified and it may give misleading and incomplete results concerning the expected risk and return of forestry. In our case, the market model risk beta was only slightly biased. This study indicates that an error-correction model is more appropriate model than the market model.
  • Heikkinen, Helsinki School of Economics, P.O. Box 1210, FIN-00101 Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: vheikkin@hkkk.fi (email)
  • Kanto, Helsinki School of Economics, P.O. Box 1210, FIN-00101 Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 644, category Research article
Jouni Pykäläinen. (2000). Defining forest owner’s forest-management goals by means of a thematic interview in interactive forest planning. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 1 article id 644. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.644
Numerical optimization may not be the best way to launch an interactive planning process. The forest owner may not be able to identify precise management goals, as required in numerical optimization, for his forest. The owner may also think that it is impossible to express forest-management goals numerically. Due to these reasons, thematic interview was tested as an introductory method in interactive planning in several actual planning cases. It was observed that these interviews helped the owners in outlining their forest-management goals, and they offered an appropriate framework for defining these goals. It was also noticed that the goals defined in the course of the interviews could be included in the planning model in a way understood and accepted by the owners, and the goals defined could be fulfilled.
  • Pykäläinen, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forestry, P.O. Box 111, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: jouni.pykalainen@joensuu.fi (email)
article id 643, category Research article
Pekka Eskelinen & Harri Eskelinen. (2000). A K-band microwave measuring system for the analysis of tree stems. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 1 article id 643. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.643
The internal structure of growing trees and freshly cut logs can be characterized in real time by analysing the transmission and reflection of Ku- or K-band microwave energy injected with a horizontal polarization towards the material. Information about the moisture content, material bends, number and location of knots and sections of spoiled wood e.g. due to insects can be gathered in real time. Most sensitive test parameters are attenuation, group delay and the rotation of a linearly polarized wavefront. A simultaneous recording of reflection reduces errors caused by non-significant surface deformations. The spatial resolution, humidity equalization and noise immunity can be improved by applying a wideband frequency modulation. Commercial building blocks supplemented with a special antenna arrangement give possibilities also for the rough harvester environment.
  • Eskelinen, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Department of Electrical Engineering, P.O. Box 20, FIN-53851 Lappeenranta, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: ari.eskelinen@pp.inet.fi (email)
  • Eskelinen, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Department of Electrical Engineering, P.O. Box 20, FIN-53851 Lappeenranta, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 642, category Research article
Jonas Rönnberg. (2000). Logging operation damage to roots of clear-felled Picea abies and subsequent spore infection by Heterobasidion annosum. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 1 article id 642. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.642
Two studies were carried out to examine the effects of clear-felling operations on stump roots of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.). In study I, the number of cases and the degree of damage to stump roots of Norway spruce were investigated on three clear-felled sites in northern and southern Sweden respectively. The cutting was done in winter or spring. A mean of 37% of the stumps had signs of root damage caused by clear-felling operations. Study II was carried out on two sites in southern and two sites in northern Sweden. The trees were clear-felled in June or July. The frequency of natural infection by Heterobasidion annosum (Fr.) Bref. through damaged roots was compared to infection through stump surfaces. The total area of damage on roots was 88% of the stump surface area. On average, 54% of the stumps were infected through the stump surface and 19% through locations of root damage. The root infections, however, were generally small in size as compared to stump surface infections. The study shows that damage to roots at clear-felling may be extensive, but this probably is not of great importance for the efficacy of stump treatment against H. annosum.
  • Rönnberg, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, P.O. Box 49, SE-230 53 Alnarp, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: jonas.ronnberg@ess.slu.se (email)
article id 641, category Research article
Juha Kaitera. (2000). Analysis of Cronartium flaccidum lesion development on pole-stage Scots pines. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 1 article id 641. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.641
Historical and current lesion development and sporulation of Cronartium flaccidum was investigated in a stand of artificially seeded pole-stage Pinus sylvestris in northern Finland. An average of 6.5 lesions developed per infected tree, most of them occurring on a minority (25%) of the trees. During the monitoring period of five years, fresh aecia appeared mainly in 7–10-year-old shoots, the age of the shoots bearing aecia varying between 3–20 years. Aecia appeared for the first time most frequently in 5–10-year-old shoots. Infection waves occurred, whereas lesions were formed most frequently in shoots formed in various years through the 1980s. After the lesions started to sporulate, sporulation in most lesions that finished sporulating during the monitoring period lasted for 1–2 years. The aecia in between 47% and 59% of the infected shoots developed annually over a longer length in proximal direction than in distal direction next to the previous year’s infection. The aecia-bearing distal part of the shoot was longer in between 19% and 37% of the shoots.
  • Kaitera, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Rovaniemi Research Station, P.O. Box 16, FIN-96301 Rovaniemi, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: juha.kaitera@metla.fi (email)
article id 640, category Research article
Jarkko Koskela. (2000). A process-based growth model for the grass stage pine seedlings. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 1 article id 640. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.640
A carbon- and nitrogen-balance model, applying pipe model theory and a modification of functional balance as growth-guiding rules, is presented for the grass stage pine seedlings. Three populations of Pinus merkusii Jungh. et de Vriese, originating from northern and northeastern Thailand, were grown under controlled environment for 47 weeks to obtain parameter information, to evaluate the model performance and to investigate genotypic variation in various characteristics among the populations. Monte Carlo simulations were used to evaluate the sensitivity of the model behaviour to varying parameter values and to calibrate the model for each population. With given sets of parameter values, the simulated biomass development fitted rather well the observed one during the experiment. The two most important parameters determining model performance were within-shoot shading and specific nitrogen uptake rate of fine roots. The fit of simulated versus measured fine roots had a major effect on acceptable model performance in Monte Carlo simulations. Significant variation in biomass growth, nitrogen use efficiency, height, stem diameter, total carbon concentrations of stem and fine roots, and total nitrogen concentrations of needles, transport roots and fine roots was found among the populations. The observed genotypic variation in seedling biomass and stem diameter was consistent with the geographical distribution of the populations while the variation in the rest of the measured characteristics was not. It seems that P. merkusii populations in Thailand are adapted to more site specific conditions rather than climatic conditions alone, and that the variation in biomass growth may result from variation in internal carbon and nitrogen dynamics among the populations.
  • Koskela, Department of Forest Ecology/Tropical Silviculture Unit, P.O. Box 28, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: jarkko.koskela@helsinki.fi (email)

Category: Review article

article id 632, category Review article
William F. Hyde & Gunnar Köhlin. (2000). Social forestry reconsidered. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 3 article id 632. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.632
This paper reviews the expectations for forestry’s contribution to rural development – and for its special contributions to the most disadvantaged, to women and the landless users of the forest commons. A growing literature challenges some of these expectations; in particular, certain expectations about cultural differences and physical stocks as explanatory factors for patterns of household behavior. This literature could also be used to support a call for sharper definitions of deforestation, improved indicators of the effects of forest resources on the rural poor, and improved design of forest policy interventions. Our paper reviews the literature, suggests some unifying themes, and identifies the critical issues that remain unanswered. The primary contention arising from this literature is that households follow systematic patterns of economic behavior in their consumption and production of forest resources, and that policy interventions in social forestry should be analyzed with regard to markets, policies, and institutions. Markets for forest resources generally exist in some form – although they may be thin. Successful forestry projects and policies require careful identification of the target populations and careful estimation of market and market-related effects on the household behavior of these populations. Institutional structures that assure secure rights for scarce forest resources are uniquely important in a forest enviornment often characterized by open access resources and weak government administration. Social and community forestry, improved stoves, improved strains of multi-purpose trees, and even private commercial forest operations can all improve local welfare, but only where scarcity is correctly identified and the appropriate institutions are in place. An increasing number of observations of afforestation from developing countries around the world is evidence that forestry activities do satisfy these conditions in selective important cases. The critical point for policy is to identify the characteristics of these successful cases that are predictive of other cases where new forestry activities can be welfare enhancing.
  • Hyde, Centre for International Forestry Research, Bogor, Indonesia ORCID ID:E-mail: wfhyde@aol.com (email)
  • Köhlin, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 639, category Review article
Klaus von Gadow. (2000). Evaluating risk in forest planning models. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 2 article id 639. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.639
The purpose of forest scenario modelling is to evaluate multiple management options and to answer what if questions relating to a particular development path of a given forest. Forest scenario planning can reduce uncertainty in management outcomes by anticipating the future in a systematic way, thus reducing the likelihood of unexpected events. It can also improve the chance that future developments will agree with specified objectives. Numerous techniques have been proposed for generating and evaluating scenarios of forest development. Some of the techniques are limited to applications in simple forest production systems while others are suitable for any type of forest management, including individual tree selection systems. Risk is defined as the expected loss due to a particular hazard for a given area and reference period. An expected loss may be calculated as the product of the damage and its probability. Risk analysis, risk evaluation and risk management are formal procedures for quantifying, evaluating and managing risk within a given hazard domain. Applications of risk analysis in forest scenario planning are rare and greater emphasis needs to be placed on hazard prediction. The aim of this contribution is to discuss some aspects of risk analysis, including examples of specific modelling tools. In a forest planning model risk can be considered in the form of specific constraints limiting the total risk in a given time period. Expected hazards can be used to exclude certain risky alternatives and finally, risk can be calculated and used to reduce the value of an objective function coefficient.
  • Gadow, Georg-August-University Göttingen, Institute for Forest Management, Büsgenweg 5, 37077 Göttingen, Germany ORCID ID:E-mail: kgadow@gwdg.de (email)

Category: Research note

article id 624, category Research note
Hashim Ali El Atta. (2000). Effect of diet and seed pretreatment on the biology of Bruchidius uberatus (Coleoptera, Bruchidae). Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 4 article id 624. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.624
Diet significantly (P < 0.0001) affected fecundity of Bruchidius uberatus Fahraeus. Provision of 1% sugar solution increased fecundity from 15 eggs/female to 47. Furthermore, sugar solution prolonged significantly the oviposition period of B. uberatus from one week to two weeks. Diet also significantly (P < 0.0001) increased adult longevity. Mean adult longevity recorded was 3, 7 and 13 days in control, water and sugar treatments, respectively. Seed pretreatment had a highly significant impact on the various developmental stages of B. uberatus. Maximum egg hatchability occurred in non-husked Acacia nilotica (L.) Willd. ex Del. seeds (83%), moderate in de-husked seeds (74%) and least in seeds presoaked in concentrated sulphuric acid (42%). The frequency of larvae that developed successfully into pupae was greatest in non-husked seeds (72%), nevertheless in de-husked and acid pretreated seeds, absolutely no larvae developed into pupae and hence the adult stage was not reached in these two treatments. Thus, de-husking and acid pretreatment of A. nilotica seeds is highly recommended.
  • El Atta, University of Khartoum, Faculty of Forestry, Department of Forest Conservation and Protection, Shambat, Sudan ORCID ID:E-mail: hashimelatta@yahoo.com (email)
article id 631, category Research note
Pekka Ripatti. (2000). Use of log-linear models in forecasting structural changes in Finnish non-industrial private forest ownership. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 3 article id 631. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.631
This paper presents how log-linear models can be used for modelling and forecasting structural changes of Finnish non-industrial private forest ownership. Two cross-sectional sets of data, which were collected in conjunction with two separate surveys by means of mail questionnaires in 1975 and 1990, were employed. A total of six non-industrial private forest holding and ownership attributes are forecast focusing on the earlier pace of structural change. The results show that the pace of change in the forecast attributes appears to be less than it would be when derived from extrapolation of the earlier trends. The results of the study can be applied to forest policy and forestry extension planning, by providing a more realistic outlook of the future structure of non-industrial private forest ownership.
  • Ripatti, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Helsinki Research Centre, Unioninkatu 40 A, FIN-00170 Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: pekka.ripatti@metla.fi (email)
article id 646, category Research note
K. S. Krishna Chaitanya, S. Keshavkant & S. C. Naithani. (2000). Changes in total protein and protease activity in dehydrating recalcitrant sal (Shorea robusta) seeds. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 1 article id 646. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.646
A rapid loss of viability was recorded in sal seeds when dehydrated below 36.7% moisture content, at ambient conditions. Seed becomes non-viable at 6 days after harvest (dah). Gradual decline in total protein content due to corresponding increase in protease activity preceded loss of viability. Almost 43.7% and 52.6% loss in total protein content was observed on 3 dah in embryonic axis and cotyledon respectively of seeds showing 100% viability. No protease activity was detected in the embryonic axis and cotyledon of freshly harvested viable seeds (0 dah). The protease activity was detected after 12 hrs of storage and increased sharply with peak levels on 6 dah (0.71 ± 0.04 / min/mg protein) and 4 dah (0.16 ± 0.01 / min/mg protein) in embryonic axis and cotyledon respectively. Later on the enzyme activity declined sharply in both the tissues. Enhanced protease activity in embryonic axes and cotyledons has been discussed with corresponding decline in total protein during desiccation induced loss of viability in sal seeds.
  • Chaitanya, Pt. Ravishankar Shukla University, Seed Biology Lab, School of Life Sciences, Raipur – 492 010 (M.P.), India ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Keshavkant, Pt. Ravishankar Shukla University, Seed Biology Lab, School of Life Sciences, Raipur – 492 010 (M.P.), India ORCID ID:E-mail: sk@n.in
  • Naithani, Pt. Ravishankar Shukla University, Seed Biology Lab, School of Life Sciences, Raipur – 492 010 (M.P.), India ORCID ID:E-mail: naithani@mantraonline.com (email)

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