Current issue: 51(2)

Under compilation: 51(3)

Impact factor 1.470
5-year impact factor 1.788
Silva Fennica 1926-1997
1990-1997
1980-1989
1970-1979
1960-1969
Acta Forestalia Fennica
1953-1968
1933-1952
1913-1932

Silva Fennica vol. 35 | 2001

Category: Research article

article id 582, category Research article
Kari Kangas & Pasi Markkanen. (2001). Factors affecting participation in wild berry picking by rural and urban dwellers. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 4 article id 582. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.582
The purpose of this study was to examine the participation of urban and rural dwellers in the activity of berry-picking. The respondents in the study lived in the city of Joensuu and in the municipality of Ilomantsi, in eastern Finland. 68% of Joensuu households compared with 82% of those in Ilomantsi participated in berry-picking. These evident differences in the participation rates may be largely due to the higher costs incurred by urban dwellers in picking, since the probability of participation was not significantly higher for Ilomantsi households compared with those in Joensuu who had access to a summer-cottage which was likely to be located near the berry resources. In both municipalities, the participants were divided into two groups according to the nature of their participation in the activity. The larger group – termed ordinary pickers – were characteristically younger families with children, while the other group, termed active pickers, were distinctly more advanced in age. The quantities picked for home consumption by the groups of pickers in Ilomantsi were twice as large as those picked by the corresponding groups in Joensuu. In Joensuu, households were not significantly involved in commercial picking.
  • Kangas, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forestry, P.O. Box 111, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: kari.kangas@joensuu.fi (email)
  • Markkanen, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forestry, P.O. Box 111, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 581, category Research article
Henrik Heräjärvi. (2001). Technical properties of mature birch (Betula pendula and B. pubescens) for saw milling in Finland. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 4 article id 581. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.581
The purpose of this study was to investigate the variation in selected technical properties of mature (age > 60 years) birch stems in southern and central Finland. Technical properties were defined as the natural external characteristics that cause differences in the usability of a certain section of stem in the mechanical wood industry, saw milling in particular. On mineral soils, birch stems in mixed stands were slightly larger than those in pure birch stands. On peatlands, however, birch stems in pure stands were larger than those in mixed stands. The average stem form of silver birch was straighter than that of white birch. Small-sized log sections of white birch, as well as those of codominant silver birch, typically contain many dead knots. On mineral soils, coniferous admixture had a positive effect on self-pruning of white birch. Self-pruning of silver birch was as good in pure birch stands as in mixed stands of spruce and birch. Occurrence of decay did not differ significantly between the two birch species. Not only silver birch, due to the growth and yield of the stand, but also vigorous and good-quality white birch, because of the possibility to provide high-quality logs, can be maintained profitably as an admixture in coniferous forests until final cutting.
  • Heräjärvi, The Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu Research Centre, P.O. Box 68, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: henrik.herajarvi@metla.fi (email)
article id 580, category Research article
Susanna Sironen, Annika Kangas, Matti Maltamo & Jyrki Kangas. (2001). Estimating individual tree growth with the k-nearest neighbour and k-Most Similar Neighbour methods. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 4 article id 580. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.580
The purpose of this study was to examine the use of non-parametric methods in estimating tree level growth models. In non-parametric methods the growth of a tree is predicted as a weighted average of the values of neighbouring observations. The selection of the nearest neighbours is based on the differences between tree and stand level characteristics of the target tree and the neighbours. The data for the models were collected from the areas owned by Kuusamo Common Forest in Northeast Finland. The whole data consisted of 4051 tally trees and 1308 Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris L.) and 367 Norway spruces (Picea abies Karst.). Models for 5-year diameter growth and bark thickness at the end of the growing period were constructed with two different non-parametric methods: the k-nearest neighbour regression and k-Most Similar Neighbour method. Diameter at breast height, tree height, mean age of the stand and basal area of the trees larger than the subject tree were found to predict the diameter growth most accurately. The non-parametric methods were compared to traditional regression growth models and were found to be quite competitive and reliable growth estimators.
  • Sironen, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forestry, P.O. Box 111, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: susanna.sironen@forest.joensuu.fi (email)
  • Kangas, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Kannus Research Station, P.O. Box 44, FIN-69101 Kannus, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Maltamo, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forestry, P.O. Box 111, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kangas, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Kannus Research Station, P.O. Box 44, FIN-69101 Kannus, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 579, category Research article
Matti Maltamo & Kalle Eerikäinen. (2001). The Most Similar Neighbour reference in the yield prediction of Pinus kesiya stands in Zambia. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 4 article id 579. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.579
The aim of the study was to develop a yield prediction model using the non-parametric Most Similar Neighbour (MSN) reference method. The model is constructed on stand level but it contains information also on tree level. A 10-year projection period was used for the analysis of stand growth. First, the canonical correlation matrix was calculated for the whole study material using stand volumes at the beginning and at the end of the growth period as independent variables and stand characteristics as dependent variable. Secondly, similar neighbour estimates were searched from the data categories reclassified according to thinnings. Due to this, it was possible to search for growth and yield series which is as accurate as possible both at the beginning and at the end of the growth period. The reliability of the MSN volume predictions was compared to the volumes predicted with the simultaneous yield model. The MSN approach was observed to be more reliable volume predictor than the traditional stand level yield prediction model both in thinned and unthinned stands.
  • Maltamo, Faculty of Forestry, University of Joensuu, P.O. Box 111, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: matti.maltamo@forest.joensuu.fi (email)
  • Eerikäinen, Faculty of Forestry, University of Joensuu, P.O. Box 111, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 578, category Research article
Kevin Boston & Pete Bettinger. (2001). Development of spatially feasible forest plans: a comparison of two modeling approaches. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 4 article id 578. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.578
Spatial goals are becoming more frequent aspects of forest management plans as regulatory and organizational policies change in response to fisheries and wildlife concerns. The combination of green-up constraints (harvesting restrictions that prevent the cutting of adjacent units for a specified period of time) and habitat requirements for red-cockaded woodpeckers (RCW) in the southeastern U.S. suggests that spatially feasible forest plans be developed to guide management activities. We examined two modeling approaches aimed at developing management plans that had both harvest volume goals, RCW habitat, and green-up constraints. The first was a two-stage method that in one stage used linear programming to assign volume goals, and in a second stage used a tabu search – genetic algorithm heuristic technique to minimize the deviations from the volume goals while maximizing the present net revenue and addressing the RCW and green-up constraints. The second approach was a one-stage procedure where the entire management plan was developed with the tabu search – genetic algorithm heuristic technique, thus it did not use the guidance for timber volume levels provided by the LP solution. The goal was to test two modeling approaches to solving a realistic spatial harvest scheduling problem. One is where to volume goals are calculated prior to developing the spatially feasible forest plan, while the other approach simultaneously addresses the volume goals while developing the spatially feasible forest plan. The resulting forest plan from the two-stage approach was superior to that produced from the one-stage approach in terms of net present value. The main point from this analysis is that heuristic techniques may benefit from guidance provided by relaxed LP solutions in their effort to develop efficient forest management plans, particularly when both commodity production and complex spatial wildlife habitat goals are considered. Differences in the production of forest products were apparent between the two modeling approaches, which could have a significant effect on the selection of wood processing equipment and facilities.
  • Boston, Forest Fibre Solutions, Carter Holt Harvey, Tokoroa, New Zealand ORCID ID:E-mail: kevin.boston@chh.co.nz (email)
  • Bettinger, Department of Forest Resources, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 577, category Research article
Jouni Siipilehto. (2001). Effect of weed control with fibre mulches and herbicides on the initial development of spruce, birch and aspen seedlings on abandoned farmland. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 4 article id 577. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.577
Post-planting weed control methods on abandoned farmland were studied in three field trials in southern Finland using a completely randomized design with four treatments and 30 to 40 replications. Mulches of 60 x 60 cm [sheet mulch – strips of plane waste and plastic fibre, newspaper – waste paper slurry, wood chips, pure wood fibre slurry], herbicides [i.e. glyphosate or terbuthylazine alone or mixed and dichlobenile applied to 1 m2 spots] and hoeing treatments were compared to an untreated control plot. The study material consisted of two-year-old containerized aspen (Populus tremula L.), silver birch (Betula pendula (L.) Roth) and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) seedlings planted in spring 1996. The ground vegetation was dominated by Elymys repens, Deschampsia cespitosa, Cirsium arvense and Epilobium angustifolium. Monitoring of the trials over a 3-year period showed a moderate effect of weed control, which varied according to the method used and by the crop species. Significant growth responses were found with herbicide in spruce, wood chips in spruce and birch and with sheet mulch in aspen seedlings. Sheet mulch also encouraged vole nesting thus increasing damages. Generally, slurry mulches proved to be insufficiently durable. Mulching had a clear insulating effect, which may increase the risk of winter drought.
  • Siipilehto, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa Research Centre, P.O. Box 18, FIN-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: jouni.siipilehto@metla.fi (email)
article id 576, category Research article
Anneli Viherä-Aarnio & Pirkko Velling. (2001). Micropropagated silver birches (Betula pendula) in the field – performance and clonal differences. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 4 article id 576. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.576
Micropropagated and seed-born silver birches (Betula pendula Roth) were compared for survival, height growth and occurrence of biotic damage (voles, hares, mooses, stem lesions and cankers) in field trials in southern Finland. The material consisted of 11 clones and 10 different lots of seedlings growing in 10 field trials, established in clear-cut forest cultivation areas. The plants were 6–7 years old. The micropropagated and seed-born material types did not significantly differ from each other as regards survival, height growth and frequencies of damage caused by biotic agents. Large and significant differences were, however, detected in survival, height and frequencies of all types of biotic damage between single clones. Careful selection and testing of birch clones in field conditions is recommended before wide-scale commercial micropropagation and practical forest cultivation takes place.
  • Viherä-Aarnio, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa Research Centre, P.O. Box. 18, FIN-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: anneli.vihera-aarnio@metla.fi (email)
  • Velling, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa Research Centre, P.O. Box. 18, FIN-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 575, category Research article
Sylvie Mussche, Roeland Samson, Lieven Nachtergale, An De Schrijver, Raoul Lemeur & Noël Lust. (2001). A comparison of optical and direct methods for monitoring the seasonal dynamics of leaf area index in deciduous forests. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 4 article id 575. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.575
During the 1996 growing season the seasonal dynamics of the Leaf Area Index (LAI) were determined by 3 different methods in two forest types: a mixed oak (Quercus robur L.) – beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) stand and an ash dominated (Fraxinus excelsior L.) stand. The results obtained from the two indirect methods, i.e. hemispherical photography and LAI-2000 Plant Canopy Analyser (Li-COR), were compared with the results of the direct measurement of litter fall collected in litter trap systems. In this study the direct method is considered to be the reference, giving the most accurate LAI-values. Both the hemispherical photography and the LAI-2000 PCA introduced an underestimation of LAI when the actual canopy leaf distribution in the crown layer deviates from a random distribution of leaf area in space as is found in the mixed oak/beech stand. However, when the condition of random leaf distribution is nearly fulfilled (ash stand), the LAI-2000 PCA gave LAI-values which were close to the results obtained from the direct method. Regression curves with R2 > 0.93 could be calculated for both indirect methods.
  • Mussche, Laboratory of Forestry, Ghent University, Geraardsbergse Steenweg 267, B-9090 Melle, Belgium ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Samson, Laboratory of Plant Ecology, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Gent, Belgium ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Nachtergale, Laboratory of Forestry, Ghent University, Geraardsbergse Steenweg 267, B-9090 Melle, Belgium ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • De Schrijver, Laboratory of Forestry, Ghent University, Geraardsbergse Steenweg 267, B-9090 Melle, Belgium ORCID ID:E-mail: An.Deschrijver@rug.ac.be (email)
  • Lemeur, Laboratory of Plant Ecology, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Gent, Belgium ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Lust, Laboratory of Forestry, Ghent University, Geraardsbergse Steenweg 267, B-9090 Melle, Belgium ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 574, category Research article
Hans W. Linderholm. (2001). Climatic influence on Scots pine growth on dry and wet soils in the central Scandinavian mountains, interpreted from tree-ring width. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 4 article id 574. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.574
Tree rings are one of the most important proxy data sources for reconstructing past climate variability. In order to understand climate variability, it is necessary to get a spatial and temporal coverage of climate information. Summer temperatures mainly influence tree growth at the altitudinal tree line, while at lower altitudes additional factors affect growth. In addition, the nature of soil where trees grow may affect growth response to climate. To decide climate as well as growth-substrate influences on Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) growing below the tree line, two tree-ring width chronologies, sampled at dry mineral soil and wet peat soil in a mountain valley in the central Scandinavian Mountains, were analysed for climate responses and spectral signals. Temperatures during growth season (May–August) showed the strongest influence on tree growth at both sites. Influence of precipitation in the growing season was low, indicating sufficient amounts of available water during growth. However, at the dry-soil site the influence of late winter/early spring precipitation was significant. Strength of the climate–tree–growth relationship at the dry site was similar to that of trees growing at the present tree line, while weaker at the wet site. Both site chronologies exhibited common spectral peaks at c. 3.5 and 13 years indicating a common growth forcing at those time scales. The wet-site chronology displayed low-frequency variations with a 19-year periodicity, where growth peaks coincided with the lunar tidal maxima indicating a possible influence of lunar forcing. At the dry-site, multi-decadal fluctuations displayed a periodicity of 66 years. Both 13- and 66-year periods can be linked to variations in sea surface temperatures of the North Atlantic Ocean, pointing to a maritime influence, on decadal scales, of pine growth in the area. These results suggest that Scots pine in this environment may be regarded as proxies of North Atlantic Ocean coupled climatic variability.
  • Linderholm, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology, Stockholm University, 106 91 Stockholm, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: hasse@natgeo.su.se (email)
article id 590, category Research article
Anna Saarsalmi, Eino Mälkönen & Sirpa Piirainen. (2001). Effects of wood ash fertilization on forest soil chemical properties. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 3 article id 590. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.590
The effects of wood ash fertilization on soil chemical properties were studied in three young Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) plantations and a Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) plantation with different site fertility in southern Finland. The dose of 3 t ha–1 of loose wood ash was applied to 4 replicate plots (25 x 25 m) at each experiment. Humus layer and mineral soil samples were taken before the treatment and 7 and 16 years after wood ash application. Results showed that neutralization as well as fertilization effects of wood ash on forest soil were of long duration. An ash-induced pH increase of 0.6–1.0 pH units and exchangeable acidity (EA) decrease of 58–83% were detected in the humus layer 16 years after wood ash application. The decrease in acidity was most pronounced on the Calluna site with initially the lowest pH and highest EA. In the mineral soil the increase in pH was observed later than in the humus layer. After 16 years, the mineral soil pH was increased (0.2–0.3 pH units) on the Vaccinium and Myrtillus sites. A corresponding and in most cases a significant increase in the extractable Ca and Mg concentrations was detected in both the humus layer and in the mineral soil. Wood ash significantly increased the effective cation exchange capacity (CECe) and base saturation (BS) but decreased the concentration of exchangeable Al in both soil layers on all the sites. No response of N availability to wood ash application could be found.
  • Saarsalmi, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa Research Centre, P.O. Box 18, FIN-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: anna.saarsalmi@metla.fi (email)
  • Mälkönen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa Research Centre, P.O. Box 18, FIN-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Piirainen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu Research Station, P.O. Box 68, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 589, category Research article
Pekka Mäkinen. (2001). Competitive strategies applied by Finnish timber carriers following deregulation. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 3 article id 589. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.589
The present study examines the success of timber carriers and the factors involved in their success immediately following deregulation. In Finland in 1991 the timber trucking sector was deregulated. Means testing was changed to suitability testing, which meant that the Ministry of Transport and Communications, provincial authorities and the trucking association could no longer regulate the entry of new entrepreneurs to the sector. The present research material contains two successful enterprise groups. In the strategically more successful group, good results were obtained with a moderate labour input by the entrepreneurs. The strategic position of this group was considered to be successful because the operating hours of the trucks were fairly high but the work loads imposed on the entrepreneur remained reasonable. The profitability of these enterprises was so good that it was possible to use hired labour to drive the trucks. The work load of close to half of the unsuccessful entrepreneurs had been large or extremely large. In some cases, the obvious reason for failure was their inadequate transportation rates. Others had seemingly satisfactory haulage rates when compared to the average, but still their enterprises performed poorly. In these cases, the explanation lay in the inefficiency of operations or excessive debts, the latter caused, for example, by earlier operations. The results of this study do not support the view that a lot of hard work generally means success in entrepreneurship. The results support the view that both entrepreneurs’ work and management inputs have a significant impact on the success of the enterprise, and that high tariffs alone are not a guarantee of success.
  • Mäkinen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa Research Centre, P.O. Box 18, FIN-01301 Vantaa ORCID ID:E-mail: pekka.makinen@metla.fi (email)
article id 588, category Research article
Marjut Ihalainen & Timo Pukkala. (2001). Modelling cowberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea) and bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) yields from mineral soils and peatlands on the basis of visual field estimates. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 3 article id 588. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.588
This study presents new models for predicting bilberry and cowberry yields from site and stand characteristics. These models enable one to evaluate the future states of forests in terms of berry yields. The modelling data consisted of visual field estimates of site and tree stand characteristics, as well as berry yields from 627 forest stands. Berry yields were estimated using a scale from 0 to 10. Using these data, models were prepared which predict the berry yield scores from those site and stand characteristics which are usually known in forest planning calculations. The model predictions correlated positively and often quite strongly with earlier models. The results were in line with previous studies on the effects of site and tree cover on berry production. According to the models, sites of medium and rather poor fertility produce the highest bilberry yields. Increasing tree height increases, and the basal area of spruce and proportion of deciduous trees decrease, bilberry yield. With mineral soils, cowberry yields are best on poor sites. A high proportion of pine improves cowberry yields. The yields are the highest in open areas and very young stands, on the one hand, and in sparsely populated stands of large and old trees, on the other hand. In pine swamps, the yields are best on rather poor sites. Increasing basal area of deciduous trees decreases cowberry yields.
  • Ihalainen, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forestry, P.O. Box 111, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: marjut.ihalainen@forest.joensuu.fi (email)
  • Pukkala, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forestry, P.O. Box 111, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 587, category Research article
Erkki Tomppo, Kari T. Korhonen, Juha Heikkinen & Hannu Yli-Kojola. (2001). Multi-source inventory of the forests of the Hebei Forestry Bureau, Heilongjiang, China. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 3 article id 587. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.587
A multi-source forest inventory method is applied to the estimation of forest resources in the area of the Hebei Forest Bureau in Heilongjiang province in North-East China. A stratified systematic cluster sampling design was utilised in field measurements. The design was constructed on the basis of information from earlier stand-level inventories, aerial orthophotographs, experiences from other sampling inventories and the available budget. Sample tree volumes were estimated by means of existing models. New models were constructed and their parameters estimated for tallied tree volumes and volume increments. The estimates for the area of the Bureau were computed from field measurements, and for the areas of the forest farms estimated from field measurements and satellite images. A k-nearest neighbour method was utilised. This method employing satellite image data makes it possible to estimate all variables, particularly for smaller areas than that possible using field measurements only. The methods presented, or their modifications, could also be applied to the planning and realisation of forest inventories elsewhere in Temperate or Boreal zones. The inventory in question gave an estimate of 114 m3/ha (the multi-source inventory 119 m3/ha) instead of 72 m3/ha as previously estimated from available information. Totally nineteen tree species, genera of species or tree species groups were identified (Appendix 1). The forests were relatively young, 60% of them younger than 40 years and 85% younger than 60 years.
  • Tomppo, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Unioninkatu 40 A, FIN-00170 Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: erkki.tomppo@metla.fi (email)
  • Korhonen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Unioninkatu 40 A, FIN-00170 Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Heikkinen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Unioninkatu 40 A, FIN-00170 Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Yli-Kojola, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Unioninkatu 40 A, FIN-00170 Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 586, category Research article
Tuula Nuutinen & Seppo Kellomäki. (2001). A comparison of three modelling approaches for large-scale forest scenario analysis in Finland. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 3 article id 586. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.586
Forests play an important role in the sequestration of carbon dioxide and the storage of carbon. The potential and efficiency of mitigation options in forestry have been studied using large-scale forestry scenario models. In Finland, three models have been applied in attempts to estimate timber production and related carbon budgets. In this study, these models are compared. The oldest, MELA, was designed in the 1970s for the regional and national analysis of timber production. The European Forest Information Scenario Model, EFISCEN, originally a Swedish area matrix model, was developed in the early 1980s. SIMA, a gap-type ecosystem model, was utilised in the 1990s for regional predictions on how the changing climate may affect forest growth and timber yield in Finland. In EFISCEN, only the development of growing stock is endogeneous because the assumptions on growth, and the removal and rules for felling are given exogeneously. In the SIMA model, the rules for felling are exogeneous but the growth is modelled based on individual trees reacting to their environment. In the MELA model, the management of forests is endogeneous, i.e. the growth, felling regimes and the development of growing stock are the results of the analysis. The MELA approach integrated with a process-based ecosystem model seems most applicable in the analyses of effective mitigation measures compatible with sustainable forestry under a changing climate. When using the scenarios for the estimation of carbon budget, the policy makers should check that the analyses cover the whole area of interest, and that the assumptions on growth and management together with the definitions applied correspond with the forestry conditions in question.
  • Nuutinen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu Research Centre, Box 68, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: tuula.nuutinen@metla.fi (email)
  • Kellomäki, University of Joensuu, Box 111, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 585, category Research article
Meinrad Rohner & Klaus Böswald. (2001). Forestry development scenarios: timber production, carbon dynamics in tree biomass and forest values in Germany. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 3 article id 585. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.585
The dynamics of the age class structure stands at the center of modeling long-run forestry scenarios. This insight has been applied to the construction of the Forest Development and Carbon Budget Simulation Model (ForCaBSiM), a model which is used for the study of several interrelated questions: the development of timber stocks and the potential level of sustainable harvests, the stocks and fluxes of tree carbon in managed forests, the economy-wide effects of management practices on the value of forest lands and timber stocks. The combined study of these issues allows to assess development scenarios with regard to the productive potential of forestry, the carbon cycle, and forest values. At present, the model is adapted to German data, but it is designed for use with other data sets as well. This paper provides a description of core mechanisms in ForCaBSiM. On this background, the choice and impact of crucial assumptions is examined. Illustrative results are used to demonstrate the use of the model. The paper focuses on the impact of varying rotation ages and the tree species composition. Particular attention is given to the concept of steady states.
  • Rohner, Renewable Resource Modeling, D-63477 Maintal, Germany ORCID ID:E-mail: rohner@rrmodeling.de (email)
  • Böswald, Factor Consulting + Management AG, CH-8045 Zurich, Switzerland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 584, category Research article
Ralph Alig, Darius Adams, John Mills, Richard Haynes, Peter Ince & Robert Moulton. (2001). Alternative projections of the impacts of private investment on southern forests: a comparison of two large-scale forest sector models of the United States. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 3 article id 584. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.584
The TAMM/NAPAP/ATLAS/AREACHANGE (TNAA) system and the Forest and Agriculture Sector Optimization Model (FASOM) are two large-scale forestry sector modeling systems that have been employed to analyze the U.S. forest resource situation. The TNAA system of static, spatial equilibrium models has been applied to make 50-year projections of the U.S. forest sector for more than 20 years. Much of its input on forest management behavior and decisions about use of forestland derives from expert-based systems external to the TNAA system. FASOM, a spatial intertemporal optimization model, directly incorporates decisions on management investment and land use options relative to agricultural alternatives as endogenous model elements. The paper contrasts projections of private forest investment from the TNAA and FASOM models, focusing on the southern United States. Comparison of the TNAA base case and an investment-restricted scenario from FASOM, both of which reflect a continuation of recent behavioral tendencies by nonindustrial private owners, suggests that Southern private timberlands have considerable biological and economic potential for intensified forest management. Unrestricted FASOM projections confirm that added investment could lead to substantially larger timber harvest volumes and lower prices than those projected in the base/restricted cases. But even under the more intensive investment scenarios, naturally regenerated forests would cover three-quarters of the future private timberland base and hardwoods would continue to dominate the inventory structure.
  • Alig, USDA Forest Service, Forestry Sciences Lab, 3200 SW Jefferson Way, Corvallis, Oregon 97331, USA ORCID ID:E-mail: ralig@fs.fed.us (email)
  • Adams, College of Forestry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331, USA ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Mills, USDA Forest Service, Forestry Sciences Lab, 1221 SW Yamhill, Portland, Oregon 97205, USA ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Haynes, USDA Forest Service, Forestry Sciences Lab, 1221 SW Yamhill, Portland, Oregon 97205, USA ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Ince, USDA Forest Service, Forest Products Lab, Madison, Wisconsin 53705, USA ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Moulton, USDA Forest Service (retired), Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709, USA ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 583, category Research article
Hans Fredrik Hoen, Tron Eid & Petter Økseter. (2001). Timber production possibilities and capital yields from the Norwegian forest area. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 3 article id 583. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.583
How intensely should a forest be grown? This is a fundamental question in the process of formulating policy guidelines for the management of a forest area, both at the individual property level as well as at the national level. The question is related to a number of factors; the objective(s) of the forest owner, the productivity of the forestland, the initial growing stock, the accessibility within the forest, assumptions regarding future prices and costs and the required real rate of return. This paper presents an applied analysis with the objective of mapping possible future paths for the growing stock on, and timber harvest from the productive forest area in Norway. The analysis is deterministic. The regeneration strategy is a key factor for the long run development of a forest and is thus given particular attention. The analysis is restricted to deal with timber production only and maximisation of the net present value of the forest area is used as the objective function. The required real rate of return is varied and used as the driving force to find the best (optimal) level of intensity in silvicultural management and thus optimal paths for harvesting and growing stocks.
  • Hoen, Agricultural University of Norway, Dept. of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 5044, N-1432 Ås, Norway ORCID ID:E-mail: hans.hoen@isf.nlh.no (email)
  • Eid, Agricultural University of Norway, Dept. of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 5044, N-1432 Ås, Norway ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Økseter, Agricultural University of Norway, Dept. of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 5044, N-1432 Ås, Norway ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 598, category Research article
A. Maarit I. Kallio. (2001). Interdependence of the sawlog, pulpwood and sawmill chip markets: an oligopsony model with an application to Finland. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 2 article id 598. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.598
The interdependence of the markets for pulpwood, sawlogs and sawmill chips is analysed using a short-run model, which accommodates the alternative competition structures of wood buyers. We propose that imperfect competition in the pulpwood market tends to make the sawmills owned by the pulp and paper companies larger than the independent ones, even in the absence of transactional economies of integration. The impact of the wood market competition pattern on the profits of the forest owners and forest industry firms depends upon a firm-capacity structure, wood supply elasticities, and business cycles in the output markets. The numerical application of the model to the Finnish softwood market suggests that inflexibility of production capacities tends to make the wood demand rather insensitive with respect to price. Only the large firms, which all produce both pulp and sawnwood, may have oligopsony power under some conditions. Integrated production can increase competition in the sawlog market via the wood chip market.
  • Kallio, Helsinki School of Economics, Department of Economics and Management Science, P.O. Box 1210, FIN-00101 Helsinki ORCID ID:E-mail: maarit.kallio@hkkk.fi (email)
article id 597, category Research article
Annika Kangas, Jyrki Kangas & Jouni Pykäläinen. (2001). Outranking methods as tools in strategic natural resources planning. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 2 article id 597. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.597
Two outranking methods, ELECTRE III and PROMETHEE II, commonly used as decision-aid in various environmental problems, and their applications to decision support for natural resources management are presented. These methods represent ‘the European school’ of multi-criteria decision making (MCDM), as opposed to ‘the American school’, represented by, for instance, the AHP method. On the basis of a case study, outranking methods are compared to so far more usually applied techniques based on the ideas of multi attribute utility theory (MAUT). The outranking methods have been recommended for situations where there is a finite number of discrete alternatives to be chosen among. The number of decision criteria and decision makers may be large. An important advantage of outranking methods, when compared to decision support techniques most often applied in today’s natural resources management, is the ability to deal with ordinal and more or less descriptive information on the alternative plans to be evaluated. Furthermore, the uncertainty concerning the values of the criterion variables can be taken into account using fuzzy relations, determined by indifference and preference thresholds. The difficult interpretation of the results, on the other hand, is the main drawback of the outranking methods.
  • Kangas, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Kannus Research Station, P.O. Box 44, FIN-69101 Kannus, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: annika.kangas@metla.fi (email)
  • Kangas, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Kannus Research Station, P.O. Box 44, FIN-69101 Kannus, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Pykäläinen, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forestry, P.O. Box 111, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 596, category Research article
Sakari Tuominen & Simo Poso. (2001). Improving multi-source forest inventory by weighting auxiliary data sources. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 2 article id 596. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.596
A two-phase sampling design has been applied to forest inventory. First, a large number of first phase sample plots were defined with a square grid in a geographic coordinate system for two study areas of about 1800 and 4500 ha. The first phase sample plots were supplied by auxiliary data of Landsat TM and IRS-1C with principal component transformation for stratification and drawing the second phase sample (field sample). Proportional allocation was used to draw the second phase sample. The number of field sample plots in the two study areas was 300 and 380. The local estimates of five continuous forest stand variables, mean diameter, mean height, age, basal area, and stem volume, were calculated for each of the first phase sample plots. This was done separately by using one auxiliary data source at a time together with the field sample information. However, if the first phase sample plot for which the stand variables were to be estimated was also a field sample plot, the information of that field sample plot was eliminated according to the cross validation principle. This was because it was then possible to calculate mean square errors of estimates related to a specific auxiliary data source. The procedure produced as many estimates for each first phase sample plot and forest stand variable as was the number of auxiliary data sources, i.e. seven estimates: These were based on Landsat TM, IRS-1C, digitized aerial photos, ocular stereoscopic interpretation from aerial photographs, data from old forest inventory made by compartments, Landsat TM95–TM89 difference image and IRS96–TM95 difference image. The final estimates were calculated as weighted averages where the weights were inversely proportional to mean square errors. The alternative estimates were calculated by applying simple rules based on knowledge and the outliers were defined. The study shows that this kind of system for finding outliers for elimination and a weighting procedure improves the accuracy of stand variable estimation.
  • Tuominen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Unioninkatu 40 A, FIN-00170 Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: sakari.tuominen@metla.fi (email)
  • Poso, Department of Forest Resource Management, P.O. Box 27, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 595, category Research article
Kenneth Nyström & Göran Ståhl. (2001). Forecasting probability distributions of forest yield allowing for a Bayesian approach to management planning. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 2 article id 595. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.595
Probability distributions of stand basal area were predicted and evaluated in young mixed stands of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) and birch (Betula pendula Roth and Betula pubescens Ehrh.) in Sweden. Based on an extensive survey of young stands, individual tree basal area growth models were estimated using a mixed model approach to account for dependencies in data and derive the variance/covariance components needed. While most of the stands were reinventoried only once, a subset of the stands was revisited a second time. This subset was used to evaluate the accuracy of the predicted stand basal area distributions. Predicting distributions of forest yield, rather than point estimates, allows for a Bayesian approach to planning and decisions can be made with due regard to the quality of the information.
  • Nyström, SLU, Department of Forest Resource Management and Geomatics, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: kenneth.nystrom@resgeom.slu.se (email)
  • Ståhl, SLU, Department of Forest Resource Management and Geomatics, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 594, category Research article
Walter Zucchini, Matthias Schmidt & Klaus von Gadow. (2001). A model for the diameter-height distribution in an uneven-aged beech forest and a method to assess the fit of such models. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 2 article id 594. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.594
This paper illustrates the application of a mixture model to describe the bivariate diameter-height distribution of trees growing in a pure, uneven-aged beech forest. A mixture of two bivariate normal distributions is considered but the methodology is applicable to mixtures of other distributions. The model was fitted to diameter-height observations for 1242 beech trees in the protected forest Dreyberg (Solling, Germany). A considerable advantage of the model, apart from the fact that it happens to fit this large data set unusually well, is that the individual parameters all have familiar interpretations. The bivariate Johnson SBB distribution was also fitted to the data for the purpose of comparing the fits. A second issue discussed in this paper is concerned with the general question of assessing the fit of models for bivariate data. We show how a device called ‘pseudo-residual’ enables one to investigate the fit of a bivariate model in new ways and in considerable detail. Attractive features of pseudo-residuals include the fact that they are not difficult to interpret; they can be computed using generally available statistical software and, most important of all, they enable one to examine the fit of a model by means of simple graphs.
  • Zucchini, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Institute for Statistics and Econometrics ORCID ID:E-mail: zucchini@wi-wiss.uni-goettingen.de (email)
  • Schmidt, Forest Research Station of Lower Saxony ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Gadow, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Institute for Forest Management and Yield Sciences ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 593, category Research article
Anneli Jalkanen. (2001). The probability of moose damage at the stand level in southern Finland. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 2 article id 593. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.593
The probability of moose damage was studied in sapling stands and young thinning stands in southern Finland. Data from the eighth National Forest Inventory in 1986–92 were used for modelling. The frequency of damage was highest at the height of two to five meters and at the age of ten to twenty years (at the time of measurement). Moose preferred aspen stands the most and least preferred Norway spruce stands. Scots pine and silver birch were also susceptible to damage. Logistic regression models were developed for predicting the probability that moose damage is the most important damaging agent in a forest stand. The best predictive variables were the age and dominant species of the stand. Variables describing the site were significant as cluster averages, possibly characterizing the area as a food source (fertility and organic soil), as well as the lack of shelter (wall stand). When sample plot, cluster and municipality levels were compared, it was found that most of the unexplained variance was at the cluster level. To improve the model, more information should be obtained from that level. The regression coefficients for aspen as supplementary species, and for pine as dominant species, had significant variance from cluster to cluster (area to area). It was also shown that the occurrence of aspen is closely connected to the occurrence of moose damage in pine sapling stands.
  • Jalkanen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Unioninkatu 40 A, FIN-00170 Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: anneli.jalkanen@metla.fi (email)
article id 592, category Research article
Marja-Liisa Juntunen. (2001). Use of pesticides in Finnish forest nurseries in 1996. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 2 article id 592. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.592
In 1996 a questionnaire on seedling production and use of pesticides was sent to 33 forest nurseries in Finland. Twenty-eight nurseries answered the questionnaire; thus the survey covered about 80% of the Finnish production of forest seedlings. According to this study, the Finnish nurseries together are using about 1000 kilograms of pesticides (as active ingredient, a.i.) annually. The most used herbicide was terbutylazine (Gardoprim-Neste®), and half of the total amount of fungicide used was chlorothalonil (Bravo 500®). Three fourths of the insecticide products had permethrin as the active ingredient. The nurseries applied, on average, 1.7 kg pesticides (a.i.)/ha annually, although the amount varied considerably between nurseries. In production of container seedlings the highest mean amounts of pesticides were applied to pine seedlings (9.5 kg/ha) and the lowest to spruce seedlings (0.9 kg/ha). To the fields of bareroot seedlings the nurseries applied, on average, 3.9 kg pesticides (a.i.)/ha. Mean amounts of pesticide (a.i.) per 1000 seedlings grown in containers were almost the same for birch and pine production, 1.6 and 1.7 grams, respectively; for production of spruce seedlings the comparable values were less than 0.5 grams. For production of bareroot seedlings the nurseries used about four times more pesticides than for container seedlings.
  • Juntunen, The Finnish Forest Research Institute, Suonenjoki Research Station, FIN-77600 Suonenjoki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: marja-liisa.juntunen@metla.fi (email)
article id 591, category Research article
Qibin Yu. (2001). Can physiological and anatomical characters be used for selecting high yielding hybrid aspen clones? Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 2 article id 591. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.591
Stomatal, CO2 exchange parameters and several leaf and growth traits were recorded in a five-year-old hybrid aspen clone trial. The field trial consisted of four aspen hybrid clones (Populus tremula L. x P. tremuloides Michx.) and one local Populus tremula seedling source. The mean estimated height of hybrid aspen clones was 1.6 times higher than for P. tremula. Similarly, basal diameter was 1.5 times and breast diameter 1.8 times higher in the hybrids. Differences were observed for physiological and growth traits among hybrid clones and P. tremula, but, only stomatal characters of hybrid clones differed significantly from those in P. tremula. Hybrid clones had larger guard cells (22.9 mm) than P. tremula (19.2 mm), whereas P. tremula had a higher stomatal density (211.3/mm2) than the hybrid clones (164.4/mm2). Among four hybrid clones, net photosynthesis was strongly correlated with foliar nitrogen. Height correlated significantly with foliar nitrogen, but negatively with leaf fresh weight, leaf dry weight and stomatal density. The results suggested that yield components could be controlled by many genes, specific to each clone. No single gas exchange or morphological variable can provide a reliable indicator of yield potential.
  • Yu, Department of Plant Biology, P.O. Box 27, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: qibin.yu@helsinki.fi (email)
article id 607, category Research article
Jurkka Kuusipalo. (2001). Plastic coating of plywood using extrusion technique. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 1 article id 607. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.607
The target was to study and develop industrially suitable methods to apply thermoplastic coatings on plywood. Typically, wear and climatic resistance for wooden sheets, such as chip board and plywood, is achieved by thermosetting resin coating (e.g. phenol-formaldehyde). However, economical and environmental issues are driving towards thermoplastic coatings (e.g. polyethylene) in such products. Several technologies, such as film gluing and laminating, have been introduced, but the costs and processing are limiting factors. This study concentrates on direct coating of plywood with extruded molten plastic film, in other words extrusion coating of plywood. This technique provides fast coating process and cheap raw materials. In the study it was found that extrusion coating of plywood is difficult. The high heat energy of the molten plastic causes moisture evaporation of the top veneer, and the only possible escape direction of the evaporated moisture is through the plastic, which causes bubbling in the plastic coating. Another disadvantage of the plywood is its rigidity, which limits the development of the process. In this work, a new technique was applied for coating the flexible veneers with typical extrusion coating equipment, where the escape of the evaporated moisture was possible through the top veneer to the atmosphere. Another main issue was to reach sufficient adhesion between plastic and plywood. Target was achieved using either monolayer polyethylene (PE-LD) or 2-layer polypropylene/adhesion polymer plastic coatings.
  • Kuusipalo, Tampere University of Technology, Institute of Paper Converting, Korkeakoulunkatu 4 C, P.O. Box 541, FIN-33720 Tampere, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: jurkka@cc.tut.fi (email)
article id 606, category Research article
Pekka Leskinen & Jyrki Kangas. (2001). Modelling future timber price development by using expert judgments and time series analysis. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 1 article id 606. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.606
Timber prices belong to the most important variables affecting the optimality of forest management. On the other hand, forecasting of timber prices is very uncertain. One difficulty when using past time series data in forecasting future timber price development is the possibility of changes in the markets and in the society at large. Expert knowledge can be applied in forecasting of timber prices as information additional to that provided by time series modelling. This paper presents an approach utilising both time series data and expert judgments in modelling future timber prices. A time series model is used as the basis for the approach. Parameters describing future timber price trends, variation in future timber prices, and the probabilities of price peaks taking place in the future are estimated with expert judgments as the basis. A case study involving 12 experts was carried out in Finland, and models were estimated for all the six major timber assortments in the country. The model produced can be utilised in the optimisation calculations of forest planning.
  • Leskinen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Kannus Research Station, P.O. Box 44, FIN-69101 Kannus, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: pekka.leskinen@metla.fi (email)
  • Kangas, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Kannus Research Station, P.O. Box 44, FIN-69101 Kannus, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 605, category Research article
Paul C. Van Deusen. (2001). Scheduling spatial arrangement and harvest simultaneously. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 1 article id 605. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.605
A method based on the Metropolis algorithm is developed for creating desirable spatial configurations on the landscape while simultaneously dealing with other objectives commonly associated with harvest scheduling. Spatial configurations are loosely specified and stochastically attained, which contrasts with other adjacency constraints based on specific block size limits. This method makes it possible to improve habitat and connectivity, and to create buffer zones as part of the scheduling process. It also works with a mapped set of polygons/forest stands and does not require a gridded system.
  • Van Deusen, NCASIS, Northeast Regional Center, 600 Suffolk Street, Fifth Floor, Lowell, MA 01854, USA ORCID ID:E-mail: pvandeusen@ncasi.org (email)
article id 604, category Research article
Dan Glöde & Ulf Sikström. (2001). Two felling methods in final cutting of shelterwood, single-grip harvester productivity and damage to the regeneration. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 1 article id 604. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.604
In order to find an efficient and careful way of final-cutting shelterwoods, two felling methods, in a single-grip harvester system, were compared with respect to productivity and damage caused to the regeneration. The shelterwood (140–165 m3/ha) consisted of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and the natural regeneration (9530–11 780 seedlings/ha) mostly of Norway spruce. Treatments were: (i) conventional felling on both sides of the harvester striproad, preferably in blanks of the regeneration; (ii) felling of the trees top-end first into the striproad using a method named “tossing the caber”. Both treatments included forwarding after felling. Conventional felling had a non-significantly higher productivity (27.4 m3/E15–h) and lower cost (25.9 SEK/m3) than tossing the caber (26.1 m3/E15–h and 27.2 SEK/m3). However, tossing the caber was significantly more efficient in the felling and processing of pine trees compared with conventional felling. The mean proportions of the disappeared and damaged seedlings were approximately 40% after both treatments. The logging-related damage to the regeneration decreased with increased distance to the striproad in the tossing the caber treatment but not in conventional felling. The conclusions were that there were no differences between the treatments regarding productivity, cost and total damage to the regeneration in mixed conifer shelterwoods but that tossing the caber could be a more productive method than conventional felling in pine dominated stands. Tossing the caber could also be beneficial at a regeneration height of 2–3 m since at this height the damage to the regeneration seems less than at conventional felling.
  • Glöde, SkogForsk, Uppsala Science Park, S-751 83 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: dan.glode@skogforsk.se (email)
  • Sikström, SkogForsk, Uppsala Science Park, S-751 83 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 603, category Research article
Kari Minkkinen, Jukka Laine & Hannu Hökkä. (2001). Tree stand development and carbon sequestration in drained peatland stands in Finland – a simulation study. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 1 article id 603. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.603
Drained peatland forests form an important timber resource in Finland. They also form a sink for atmospheric carbon (C) because of the increased growth and C sequestration rates following drainage. These rates have, however, been poorly quantified. We simulated the tree stand dynamics for drained peatland stands with and without cuttings over two stand rotations. Simulations were done on four peatland site types and two regions in Finland with different climatic conditions, using recently published peatland tree growth models applied in a stand simulator. We then calculated the amount of C stored in the stands on the basis of previously published tree-level biomass and C content models. Finally, we developed regression models to estimate C stores in the tree stands using stand stem volume as the predictor variable. In the managed stands, the mean growth (annual volume increment) ranged from 2 to 9 m3 ha–1 a–1, depending on the rotation (first/second), site type and region. Total yield during one rotation varied from 250 to 920 m3 ha–1. The maximum stand volumes varied from 220 to 520 m3 ha–1 in the managed stands and from 360 to 770 m3 ha–1 in the unmanaged. By the end of the first post-drainage rotation the total C store in the managed stands had increased by 6–12 kg C m–2 (i.e. 45–140 g C m–2 a–1) compared to that in the undrained situation. Averaged over two rotations, the increase in the total C store was 3–6 kg C m–2. In the corresponding unmanaged stands the C stores increased by 8–15 kg m–2 over the same periods. At stand level, the C stores were almost linearly related to the stem volume and the developed regression equations could explain the variation in the simulated C stores almost entirely.
  • Minkkinen, University of Helsinki, Department of Forest Ecology, P.O. Box 27, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: kari.minkkinen@helsinki.fi (email)
  • Laine, University of Helsinki, Department of Forest Ecology, P.O. Box 27, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Hökkä, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Rovaniemi Research Station, P.O. Box 16, FIN-96301 Rovaniemi, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 602, category Research article
Teijo Nikkanen. (2001). Reproductive phenology in a Norway spruce seed orchard. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 1 article id 602. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.602
Reproductive phenology was studied in a Norway spruce seed orchard, located in southern Finland (62°13’N, 25°24’E), consisting of 67 clones from northern Finland (64°–67°N). Timing of flowering was determined on the basis of data recorded by a pollen catch meter during 1984–1995, and visual observations made on grafts in 1989, 1992, 1993 and 1995. The genetic and environmental factors affecting female and male phenology, and reproductive synchronisation were studied. The between-year variation in the timing of flowering was more than three weeks. However, when it was defined on the basis of the effective temperature sum, the variation was smaller. No phenological reproductive isolation was found between the seed orchard and surrounding natural forests. The duration of the receptive period of the seed orchard varied from 5 to 8 days, and anthesis determined on the basis of airborne pollen from 5 to 10 days. The receptive period started about one day earlier than anthesis, except in one abnormally warm flowering period when female and male flowering started simultaneously. In general, the flowering periods of the different clones overlapped. The clonal differences in the phenology of receptivity were in most cases statistically significant, but in pollen shedding they were not. The broad-sense heritability estimates were higher for female than for male phenology. Environmental factors, conversely, had a stronger effect on male phenology. A wide graft spacing and a graft position that favoured solar radiation on the lower parts of the crown promoted early pollen shedding and, subsequently, better reproductive synchronisation between female and male flowering.
  • Nikkanen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Punkaharju Research Station, FIN-58451 Punkaharju, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: teijo.nikkanen@metla.fi (email)
article id 601, category Research article
Ricardo Alía, Javier Moro-Serrano & Eduardo Notivol. (2001). Genetic variability of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) provenances in Spain: growth traits and survival. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 1 article id 601. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.601
Plants obtained from seed of 16 Spanish and 6 German provenances of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) were installed at five trial sites distributed throughout the natural range of the species in Spain. Five years after planting (7 years of age) the experimental material was measured for total height, diameter, number of twigs at the fourth year whorl and survival. The analysis confirmed that the rate of height growth of the Spanish is lower than that of the German provenances, whereas for the other traits the best Spanish compare favourably with the Germans. Provenance by site interaction was very significant (P < 0.01) for most traits. Attempts to model the interaction of Spanish provenances on height by simultaneous introduction of some climatic and geographic covariates on both factors were not successful but a multiplicative model with one bilinear term was enough to provide a sensible explanation of this interaction. Usually, provenances closest to each trial site were found better adapted than more distant ones but some provenances of close origin presented a different behaviour. Processes of adaptation and selection of these ancient populations could be considered as the main factors to cause this interaction.
  • Alía, CIFOR-INIA, Unidad de Mejora Forestal, 28080 Madrid, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Moro-Serrano, CIFOR-INIA, Unidad de Mejora Forestal, 28080 Madrid, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail: jmoro@inia.es (email)
  • Notivol, Unidad de Recursos Forestales, SIA-DGA, Ca de Montañana 179, 50080 Zaragoza, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 600, category Research article
Qibin Yu, P. M. A. Tigerstedt & Matti Haapanen. (2001). Growth and phenology of hybrid aspen clones (Populus tremula L. x Populus tremuloides Michx.). Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 1 article id 600. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.600
Height, basal diameter, diameter at breast height, bud burst, and leaf development were recorded in a 5-year-old hybrid aspen clonal trial. The field trial consisted of four aspen hybrid clones (Populus tremula x Populus tremuloides) and one local P. tremula seedling source. Phenological traits were observed in the 3rd year. Growth patterns were recorded during the 3rd and 4th years. Phenological traits were explored in relation to hybrid vigor expressed as growth traits. Differences were observed for phenological and growth traits among hybrid clones and P. tremula. The growth period varied from 143–158 days for the four hybrid clones, and was 112 days for P. tremula. The correlation between growth period and yield was highly significant. The annual growth rate of height for the hybrids was 4.2 cm per 7 days (2.4 for P. tremula) in the 3rd year and 6.4 cm per 7 days (2.9 for P. tremula) in the 4th year. After 5 years, mean estimated stem volume of the hybrids was 3.9 times that of P. tremula. Significant clone by year interaction was observed for height, diameter, and volume growth. The hybrid vigor seems to be mainly attributable to a longer growth period.
  • Yu, Department of Plant Biology, P.O. Box 27, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: qibin.yu@helsinki.fi (email)
  • Tigerstedt, Department of Plant Biology, P.O. Box 27, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Haapanen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, P.O. Box 18, FIN-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 599, category Research article
Chun-Jiang Liu, Carl J. Westman & Hannu Ilvesniemi. (2001). Matter and nutrient dynamics of pine (Pinus tabulaeformis) and oak (Quercus variabilis) litter in North China. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 1 article id 599. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.599
In the mountainous area of North China, a distinguishing feature of climate is the serious drought of spring and the humidity and high temperature of summer by which the litter production and decomposition of forest litter were strongly characterized. We investigated the dynamic and nutrient characteristics of litter in a 30-year-old mixed stand of Chinese pine (Pinus tabulaeformis Carr.) and deciduous orient oak (Quercus variabilis Bl.) and two comparable pure stands. Oak litterfall peaked in November and pine litterfall in December. The oak stand had the largest annual litterfall (347 g m–2) and the forest floor mass (950 g m–2), the mixed stand the second (236 g m–2 and 634 g m–2), and the pine stand the least (217 g m–2 and 615 g m–2). The nutrient return through litterfall and the storage in forest floor followed corresponding order between three stands. The weight loss of pine and oak foliage litter in first year was 25% and 20%. For senesced pine and oak leaves, the translocation rates of N, P and K were 56–83%. Nutrient concentrations were higher in oak leaf litter than pine needle litter, and the concentration of N and Ca appeared to rise while K concentration decreased in both decomposing litter.
  • Liu, Department of Forest Ecology, P.O. Box 27, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: cliu@silvia.helsinki.fi (email)
  • Westman, Department of Forest Ecology, P.O. Box 27, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Ilvesniemi, Department of Forest Ecology, P.O. Box 27, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:

Category: Research note

article id 609, category Research note
Aleksei Fedorkov. (2001). Climatic adaptation of seed maturity in Scots pine and Norway spruce populations. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 1 article id 609. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.609
Seed maturation of Scots pine and Norway spruce in a provenance experiment at Kortkeros (northern Russia) was examined by the X-ray method. Logarithmic relationships were found between seed anatomy development and long-term average thermal sum. Seed development in the northern populations of Scots pine and Norway spruce was a little faster than in the southern ones.
  • Fedorkov, Russian Academy of Sciences, Komi Science Centre, Institute of Biology, Kommunisticheskya St., 28, 167610 Syktyvkar, Russia ORCID ID:E-mail: fedorkov@ib.komisc.ru (email)
article id 608, category Research note
Jouni Partanen, Ilkka Leinonen & Tapani Repo. (2001). Effect of accumulated duration of the light period on bud burst in Norway spruce (Picea abies) of varying ages. Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 1 article id 608. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.608
One-year-old seedlings (two sowing times), two-year-old seedlings and 14- and 18-year-old cuttings of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) were exposed to shortening photoperiod (initially 16 h), lengthening photoperiod (initially 6 h) and constant short photoperiod (6 h) treatments with uniform temperature conditions in growth chambers. The timing of bud burst was examined. In all plants, shortening photoperiod treatment seemed to promote bud burst compared with other treatments. This effect was clearest in the oldest material. The results suggest that, in addition to temperature sum, the accumulated duration of the light period may promote bud burst of Norway spruce.
  • Partanen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Punkaharju Research Station, Finlandiantie 18, FIN-58450 Punkaharju, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: jouni.partanen@metla.fi (email)
  • Leinonen, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forestry, P.O. Box 111, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Repo, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forestry, P.O. Box 111, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:

Category: Discussion article

article id 610, category Discussion article
Risto Päivinen & Perttu Anttila. (2001). How reliable is a satellite forest inventory? Silva Fennica vol. 35 no. 1 article id 610. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.610
  • Päivinen, European Forest Institute, Torikatu 34, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: risto.paivinen@efi.fi (email)
  • Anttila, European Forest Institute, Torikatu 34, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:

Register
Click this link to register for Silva Fennica submission and tracking system.
Log in
If you are a registered user, log in to save your selected articles for later access.
Contents alert
Sign up to receive alerts of new content

Your selected articles