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Silva Fennica vol. 44 | 2010

Category: Research article

article id 452, category Research article
Catherine Ky-Dembele, Mulualem Tigabu, Jules Bayala, Patrice Savadogo, Issaka Joseph Boussim & Per Christer Odén. (2010). Clonal propagation of Detarium microcarpum from root cuttings. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 5 article id 452. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.452
Detarium microcarpum is a valuable tree species for fuelwood, timber, food and medicine in sub-Saharan Africa. However, its population is dwindling due to overexploitation, its seedlings’ low survival rate and slow growth. Vegetative propagation might enhance both survival and growth, but to date a successful clonal method does not exist for D. microcarpum. We conducted four experiments to examine the effects of propagation environment (high versus low humidity), cutting length and diameter, alignment of root segments (horizontal versus vertical) and distance from the root collar of donors on the regeneration ability of root segments collected from field-grown D. microcarpum trees in Burkina Faso. The size of root segments significantly affected their regeneration ability, while alignment had no effect. Sprouting was possible from 10 and 20-cm long segments of 15–60 mm diameter with 7–43% sprouting efficiency and multiple shoots while 5 cm long segments were unsuitable with 0–3% sprouting efficiency. Cuttings maintained at low humidity produced larger diameter sprouts than those in greenhouse. All cuttings showed strong polarity with most of the shoots developing at the proximal end. Rootlings from 20 cm root segments produced more new roots (0.62 ± 0.08 g) than those from 10 cm segments (0.34 ± 0.09 g), but they were similar for sprout and leaf growth. We conclude that lateral roots of field-grown mature trees can be used to produce rootlings in a nursery. Since this study is the first attempt to propagate D. microcarpum from root cuttings, further investigations are required to optimize the technique.
  • Ky-Dembele, Département Productions Forestières, Institut de l’Environnement et de Recherches Agricoles, 03 BP 7047 Ouagadougou 03, Burkina Faso & Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, P.O. Box 101, SE-230 53 Alnarp, Sweden (catherine.dembele@ess.slu.se) ORCID ID:E-mail: kydembele@hotmail.com (email)
  • Tigabu, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, P.O. Box 101, SE-230 53, Alnarp, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Bayala, World Agroforestry Centre, West Africa and Centre Regional Office, Sahel Node, BP E5118 Bamako, Mali ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Savadogo, Département Productions Forestières, Institut de l’Environnement et de Recherches Agricoles, 03 BP 7047 Ouagadougou 03, Burkina Faso & Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, P.O. Box 101, SE-230 53 Alnarp, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Boussim, Université de Ouagadougou, Unité de Formation et Recherche en Sciences de la Vie et de la Terre, 03 BP 7021, Ouagadougou 03, Burkina Faso ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Odén, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, P.O. Box 101, SE-230 53, Alnarp, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 451, category Research article
Thomas P. Sullivan, Druscilla S. Sullivan, Pontus M. F. Lindgren & Douglas B. Ransome. (2010). Green-tree retention and life after the beetle: stand structure and small mammals 30 years after salvage harvesting. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 5 article id 451. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.451
We report on a retrospective investigation of the impacts of salvage harvesting of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia Engelm. ex S. Wats.), killed by an outbreak of mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopk.) in the 1970s, with variable retention of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirbel) Franco). Our inference to biodiversity was coniferous stand structure and four mammal species: the southern red-backed vole (Myodes gapperi Vigors), common shrew (Sorex cinereus Kerr), red squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus Erxleben) and northern flying squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus Shaw). We tested hypotheses that, at 30 years after salvage harvest of beetle-killed lodgepole pine trees, (1) abundance and diversity of stand structure, and (2) abundance of mammal species, will increase with higher levels of green-tree retention (GTR). Stand structure attributes and small mammals were sampled during 2005–2008 in young pine stands, with a range of GTR seed-trees (none, dispersed, and aggregated Douglas-fir), and uncut forest in south-central British Columbia, Canada. Diameters and heights of Douglas-fir and lodgepole pine and basal area of total conifers supported hypothesis (1). Mean abundance of the red-backed vole was consistently higher (2.3 to 6.4 times) in the uncut forest than other stands. Overall mean patterns of abundance for common shrews, red squirrels, and northern flying squirrels were similar among treatment stands. Mean abundance of the red-backed vole supported hypothesis (2), but numbers of the other three species did not. There is “life after the beetle” at 30 years after salvage harvesting, and this was enhanced by GTR.
  • Sullivan, Department of Forest Sciences, Faculty of Forestry, University of BC, 2424 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4 ORCID ID:E-mail: tom.sullivan@ubc.ca (email)
  • Sullivan, Department of Forest Sciences, Faculty of Forestry, University of BC, 2424 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4 ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Lindgren, Applied Mammal Research Institute, 11010 Mitchell Avenue, Summerland, BC, Canada V0H 1Z8 ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Ransome, Applied Mammal Research Institute, 11010 Mitchell Avenue, Summerland, BC, Canada V0H 1Z8 ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 127, category Research article
Mika Rekola, Annukka Valkeapää & Tapio Rantala. (2010). Nordic forest professionals’ values. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 5 article id 127. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.127
The present study analyses the values held by forest professionals in three Nordic countries: Finland, Norway, and Sweden. The data is from a large (n = 1113) internet survey that used cognitive mapping as a research tool, which is a novelty in value measurement. The questionnaire is based on the organisational value theory of Schein (1992), supplemented with relevant forest-related and environmental values. The forest-related main value factors were in the following order of importance: Expertise, Private forestry, Forest production, Nature conservation, and Tradition. The measurement included two kinds of cases: action values, referring to present decision-making, and ideal values, referring to decisions concerning future ideals. Most of the values’ scores were similar. Almost all values received higher scores of importance in the ideal cases compared to action cases, a fact that can probably be explained by constraints related to the professionals’ current working environment. Some international differences were also found: Sweden and Norway were closer to each other and both differed from Finland, where private forestry, forest production, and traditions are highly valued. Moreover, respondents working in industry were found to be slightly more production-oriented than other forest professionals. The study also revealed several weaknesses of the cognitive mapping method in measuring values.
  • Rekola, University of Helsinki, Department of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 27, FI-00014 University of Helsinki ORCID ID:E-mail: mika.rekola@helsinki.fi (email)
  • Valkeapää, University of Helsinki, Department of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 27, FI-00014 University of Helsinki ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Rantala, University of Helsinki, Department of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 27, FI-00014 University of Helsinki ORCID ID:E-mail: tapio.rantala@helsinki.fi
article id 126, category Research article
Anders Roos, Lotta Woxblom & Denise McCluskey. (2010). The influence of architects and structural engineers on timber in construction – perceptions and roles. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 5 article id 126. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.126
This study considers structural engineers’ and architects’ perceptions of structural timber in multi-story construction contexts. Qualitative approaches – interviews and focus groups – were used to investigate attitudes, perceived norms, and perceived factors that hamper or facilitate the prescription of wood use in construction. Wood was perceived as an appropriate building material. Architects’, and even more so engineers’, perceptions of negative aspects of wood focused on decay, instability and sound transmission. Although wood-based construction was seen as a required professional skill, it was not expected to improve one’s professional status. Positive aspects of wood in construction included its strength, environmental friendliness, simple handling and appropriateness for use in conjunction with industrial methods, whereas knowledge gaps and weak support from the wood industry have reduced the use of wood among structural engineers and architects. Both professions perceived their influence on material selection to be weak. They sensed that most of the influence over material selection rested with developers and contractors. The paper contains suggestions on how to make these two professions more influential advocates for wood in construction.
  • Roos, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Forest Products, P.O. Box 7008, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: anders.roos@sprod.slu.se (email)
  • Woxblom, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Forest Products, P.O. Box 7008, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • McCluskey, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Forest Products, P.O. Box 7008, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 125, category Research article
Juho Rantala & Tiina Laine. (2010). Productivity of the M-Planter tree-planting device in practice. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 5 article id 125. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.125
Need to mechanise tree-planting work have recently increased for many reasons. The newest planting and soil scarification device performing work in Nordic forests is the Finnish M-Planter. This study aims to clarify M-Planter’s productivity in practice and show how various factors affect it. The follow-up data set covers 607 work shifts, of 13 operators with, in total, five M-Planters. The average productivity figures for the operators were 143 and 169 seedlings per effective working hour during the first and second planting season, respectively. Overall, the measured average productivity was 34.2% lower than that observed in an earlier work study of the M-Planter based on an experimental study design. On average, the operators learned to use the combination of the M-Planter and a base machine more efficiently while their experience in using it increased during the follow-up. Increasing number of stones and stumps as well as a thicker humus layer decreased productivity of the M-Planter. The study concludes that utilisation of the full productivity potential of the M-Planter requires not only good operators but also development of the whole planting service supply chain.
  • Rantala, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Juntintie 154, FI-77600 Suonenjoki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: juho.rantala@metla.fi (email)
  • Laine, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Juntintie 154, FI-77600 Suonenjoki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 124, category Research article
Johannes Windisch, Lauri Sikanen, Dominik Röser & David Gritten. (2010). Supply chain management applications for forest fuel procurement – cost or benefit? Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 5 article id 124. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.124
It is commonly agreed that logistics is very demanding in forest fuel business. Even though logistics and supply chain management (SCM) tools already have found their way into forestry business, for example, in roundwood operations, they are not yet very widespread in the field of forest fuel procurement. The present study investigates if modern supply chain management applications are capable of increasing the profitability of forest fuel procurement operations. Since margins are low, decreasing the provision costs could boost wood-based bioenergy business. The study is based on the investigation of two Finnish forest owners associations (FOA) involved in forest fuel procurement using a modern SCM tool. The investigation is done by cost-benefit analysis (CBA) using the net present value (NPV) methodology to determine the profitability. According to the estimates made by the staff, which are based on data such as work time records and delivery notes from before and after introduction of the new system, in both FOAs, the benefits far outweigh the costs over a considered timespan of ten years. However, the amount of the NPV varied significantly. For FOA1, with an annual chip production of 150 000 loose m3, the NPV is 212 739 euro, while for FOA2, with an annual chip production of 37 000 loose m3, the NPV is 969 841 euro. Even if the NPV of FOA2 seems to be very high, the profitability of SCM tools in forest fuel procurement is clearly demonstrated. Additionally, the results indicate that a considerable cost saving potential in forest fuel procurement is attainable through improving work flows and thus reduce the work input.
  • Windisch, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu Research Unit, Yliopistokatu 6, P.O. Box 68, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: johannes.windisch@metla.fi (email)
  • Sikanen, University of Eastern Finland, School of Forest Science, Yliopistokatu 7, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Röser, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu Research Unit, Yliopistokatu 6, P.O. Box 68, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Gritten, University of Eastern Finland, School of Forest Science, Yliopistokatu 7, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 123, category Research article
Staffan Jacobson & Folke Pettersson. (2010). An assessment of different fertilization regimes in three boreal coniferous stands. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 5 article id 123. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.123
In 1981–82 three field experiments were established with the aim of elucidating (i) the growth response of middle-aged coniferous stands at different fertilization intensities and, hence, the economic outcomes; and (ii) the need to add nutrients other than nitrogen (N). Nutrient additions were performed at intervals of two, four, six and eight years. The experiments were established on typical podzolized and N-limited mor-humus sites, two in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stands and one in a Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) stand, at three different locations in Sweden. The ages of the stands were 65–70 years at the time of establishment. Growth responses were calculated after a 22-year study period. The growth responses were significant in all treatments. The addition of nutrients other than N did not affect stem growth at any of the sites. The growth response tended to increase with decreasing application interval. The results also revealed that the efficiency of fertilization is reduced as the interval between fertilizations is shortened. Accordingly, the growth effect per kg of added N was negatively correlated to fertilization intensity. The least intensive fertilization regime (an eight-year interval) resulted in an average net increase in C sequestration of 35 kg per kg N added. The profitability, in terms of internal rate of return, the present net value at different interest rates and the cost of production, i.e. the cost to produce one extra m3 under the different N regimes, are presented and discussed.
  • Jacobson, Skogforsk, Uppsala Science Park, SE-75183 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: staffan.jacobson@skogforsk.se (email)
  • Pettersson, Skogforsk, Uppsala Science Park, SE-75183 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 122, category Research article
Benoit Lafleur, Nicole J. Fenton, David Paré, Martin Simard & Yves Bergeron. (2010). Contrasting effects of season and method of harvest on soil properties and the growth of black spruce regeneration in the boreal forested peatlands of eastern Canada. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 5 article id 122. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.122
It has been suggested that without sufficient soil disturbance, harvest in boreal forested peatlands may accelerate paludification and reduce forest productivity. The objectives of this study were to compare the effects of harvest methods (clearcutting vs. careful logging) and season (summer vs. winter harvest) on black spruce regeneration and growth in boreal forested peatlands of eastern Canada, and to identify the soil variables that favour tree growth following harvest. Moreover, we sought to determine how stand growth following harvest compared with that observed following fire. The average tree height of summer clearcuts was greater than that of summer carefully logged stands and that of all winter harvested sites. Summer clearcutting also resulted in a higher density of trees > 3 m and > 4 m tall and in a 50% reduction in Rhododendron groenlandicum cover, a species associated with reduced black spruce growth. Height growth of sample trees was related to foliar N and P concentrations, and to soil total N, pH and available Ca and Mg but not to harvest method or season. Our results also indicate that summer clearcutting could produce stand productivity levels comparable to those observed after high-severity soil burns. These results suggest that summer clearcutting could be used to restore forest productivity following harvest in forested peatlands, and offer further support to the idea that sufficient levels of soil disturbance may be required to restore productivity in ecosystems undergoing paludification.
  • Lafleur, NSERC-UQAT-UQAM Industrial Chair in Sustainable Forest Management, Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue, 445 boul. de l’Université, Rouyn-Noranda, QC J9X 5E4, Canada ORCID ID:E-mail: benoit.lafleur@uqat.ca (email)
  • Fenton, NSERC-UQAT-UQAM Industrial Chair in Sustainable Forest Management, Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue, 445 boul. de l’Université, Rouyn-Noranda, QC J9X 5E4, Canada ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Paré, Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Laurentian Forestry Centre, 1055 du P.E.P.S., P.O. Box 10380, Stn. Sainte-Foy, QC G1V 4C7, Canada ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Simard, Département de Géographie, Université Laval, Pavillon Abitibi-Price, 2405 rue de la Terrasse, Québec, QC G1V 0A6, Canada ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Bergeron, NSERC-UQAT-UQAM Industrial Chair in Sustainable Forest Management, Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue, 445 boul. de l’Université, Rouyn-Noranda, QC J9X 5E4, Canada ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 121, category Research article
Catherine Ky-Dembele, Jules Bayala, Patrice Savadogo, Mulualem Tigabu, Per Christer Odén & Issaka Joseph Boussim. (2010). Comparison of growth responses of Khaya senegalensis seedlings and stecklings to four irrigation regimes. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 5 article id 121. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.121
Khaya senegalensis is an important tree species for timber production, native to West Africa, but mahogany shoot borer attacks prevent successful plantations. This research was aimed at comparing the growth of two propagule types, seedlings and stecklings, of Khaya senegalensis subjected to four irrigation regimes, 25, 50, 75 and 100% field capacity in Burkina Faso. The relative growth rate, biomass allocation and intrinsic water use efficiency of the propagules were assessed in a full-factorial pot experiment in block design. Except the relative growth rate of stem basal diameter and specific leaf area, for which mean values were significantly higher for seedlings than stecklings, the two propagule types had similar growth patterns regarding relative growth rates of stem length, leaf, stem, root and the total plant biomass. There was no significant difference between propagule types concerning biomass fraction to total plant biomass of leaf, stem and root, root to stem ratio, leaf area productivity and carbon isotope ratio (δ13C). However, the irrigation regimes significantly affected all parameters. In contrast to 75 and 100% field capacity irrigation regimes, the low water supply of 25 and 50% field capacity resulted in plant stress, which was evident from the significant reduction in plant growth and biomass production and an increase in the root biomass to total plant biomass ratio and δ13C. It can be concluded that seedlings and stecklings have comparable growth patterns, while water stress is a major growth-limiting factor highlighting the need for selecting drought and borer resistant genotypes for successful plantations.
  • Ky-Dembele, Département Productions Forestières, Institut de l’Environnement et de Recherches Agricoles, 03 BP 7047 Ouagadougou 03, Burkina Faso & Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, P.O. Box 101, SE-230 53 Alnarp, Sweden (catherine.dembele@slu.se) ORCID ID:E-mail: kydembele@hotmail.com (email)
  • Bayala, World Agroforestry Centre, West Africa and Centre Regional Office, Sahel Node, BP E5118 Bamako, Mali ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Savadogo, Département Productions Forestières, Institut de l’Environnement et de Recherches Agricoles, 03 BP 7047 Ouagadougou 03, Burkina Faso & Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, P.O. Box 101, SE-230 53 Alnarp, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Tigabu, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, P.O. Box 101, SE-230 53, Alnarp, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Odén, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, P.O. Box 101, SE-230 53, Alnarp, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Boussim, Université de Ouagadougou, Unité de Formation et Recherche en Sciences de la Vie et de la Terre, 03 BP 7021, Ouagadougou 03, Burkina Faso ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 120, category Research article
Antti J. Lukkarinen, Seppo Ruotsalainen, Teijo Nikkanen & Heli Peltola. (2010). Survival, height growth and damages of Siberian (Larix sibirica Ledeb.) and Dahurian (Larix gmelinii Rupr.) larch provenances in field trials located in southern and northern Finland. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 5 article id 120. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.120
The aim of this study was to analyse differences in the survival and height growth of, as well as damages to Siberian (Larix sibirica Ledeb.) and Dahurian (Larix gmelinii Rupr.) larch provenances over four growing seasons in field trials established in 2006 in southern (Punkaharju) and northern Finland (Kivalo). In this context, the study also investigated if the geographical and climatic conditions of the origin of the provenance could explain the differences between the provenances. The study material consisted of 20 Russian Siberian and Dahurian larch provenances and five seed sources from Finland (4) and Russia (1) as comparison lots. It was found that the Finnish seed sources of Siberian larch survived well in both the Kivalo and Punkaharju trials. Five northern latitude Russian provenances, of which one was Dahurian and the remainder were Siberian larches, had the highest survival in Kivalo. However, the differences observed in survival between provenances were only significant (p < 0.05) in Kivalo. Regardless of the trial, the differences, however, in height growth were significant and large between provenances. The southern Dahurian larches had a superior height growth in Punkaharju. The northern Dahurian larch provenance from Magadan (59°50′N, 150°40′E) had the largest height growth in Kivalo, among some northern Siberian larches. Damages were diverse, though Dahurian larches had less mammal damage than the Siberian larches. In general, the differences between provenances were not significant. Latitude and altitude best explained the differences between provenances, but also mean temperature, temperature sum and continentality index affected them (p < 0.05).
  • Lukkarinen, University of Eastern Finland, School of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: antti.lukkarinen@pp.inet.fi (email)
  • Ruotsalainen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, FI-58450 Punkaharju, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Nikkanen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, FI-58450 Punkaharju, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Peltola, University of Eastern Finland, School of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 111, category Research article
Ilona Pietilä, Annika Kangas, Antti Mäkinen & Lauri Mehtätalo. (2010). Influence of growth prediction errors on the expected losses from forest decisions. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 5 article id 111. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.111
In forest planning, forest inventory information is used for predicting future development of forests under different treatments. Model predictions always include some errors, which can lead to sub-optimal decisions and economic loss. The influence of growth prediction errors on the reliability of projected forest variables and on the treatment propositions have previously been examined in a few studies, but economic losses due to growth prediction errors is an almost unexplored subject. The aim of this study was to examine how the growth prediction errors affected the expected losses caused by incorrect harvest decisions, when the inventory interval increased. The growth models applied in the analysis were stand-level growth models for basal area and dominant height. The focus was entirely on the effects of growth prediction errors, other sources of uncertainty being ignored. The results show that inoptimality losses increased with the inventory interval. Average relative inoptimality loss was 3.3% when the inventory interval was 5 years and 11.6% when it was 60 years. Average absolute inoptimality loss was 230 euro ha–1 when the inventory interval was 5 years and 860 euro ha–1 when it was 60 years. The average inoptimality losses varied between development classes, site classes and main tree species.
  • Pietilä, University of Helsinki, Department of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 27, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kangas, University of Helsinki, Department of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 27, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: annika.kangas@helsinki.fi (email)
  • Mäkinen, University of Helsinki, Department of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 27, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Mehtätalo, University of Eastern Finland, School of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 454, category Research article
Paula Jylhä, Olli Dahl, Juha Laitila & Kalle Kärhä. (2010). The effect of supply system on the wood paying capability of a kraft pulp mill using Scots pine harvested from first thinnings. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 4 article id 454. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.454
The efficiencies of wood supply systems based on cut-to-length (CTL) harvesting, the harvesting of loose whole trees, and whole-tree bundling were compared using the relative wood paying capabilities (WPC) of a kraft pulp mill as decisive criteria. The WPCs from mill to stump were calculated for three first-thinning stands of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) with mean breast-height diameter of the removal of 6, 8, and 12 cm. Pulp price had a strong effect on the WPC, and the CTL system resulted in the highest WPC per m3 at stump. The savings in procurement costs and gains in energy generation from additional raw material acquired with the harvesting of loose whole trees did not compensate the losses in pulp production. Considering removal per hectare, loose whole trees gave the highest WPCs at stump in the two stands with the smallest trees and the highest proportion of additional raw material. Decrease in pulp price and increase in energy price improved the competitiveness of the whole-tree systems. In the case of whole-tree bundling, savings in transportation costs did not balance the high cutting and compaction costs, and the bundling system was the least competitive alternative.
  • Jylhä, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Kannus, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: paula.jylha@metla.fi (email)
  • Dahl, Aalto University School of Science and Technology, Department of Forest Products Technology, Espoo, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Laitila, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kärhä, Metsäteho Oy, Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 453, category Research article
Eduard Schiessl, Michael Grabner, Gerald Golesch, Thomas Geburek & Silvio Schueler. (2010). Sub-montane Norway spruce as alternative seed source for a changing climate? A genetic and growth analysis at the fringe of its natural range in Austria. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 4 article id 453. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.453
Insights into the intraspecific variation in climate response of forest trees and the utilization of suitable seed sources are required to maintain forest ecoystems under expected climate change. Individuals of Norway spruce with an anomalous spherical-shaped crown were characterized by genetic (using a mtDNA marker) and dendroclimatic analysis. Such trees occur frequently at the fringe of the spruce distribution in east/south-east Austria. We employed pair-wise comparisons between trees with spherical and “regular” conical crowns on 47 sites. No evidence was found for a different phylogeographic history of spherical and conical spruces, but the high allelic diversity at the nad1 locus highlighted the importance of east/south-east Austria as refugium and migration corridor for Norway spruce. Analysis of mean annual increment revealed a larger amount of earlywood within the sapwood area and fewer negative pointer years for spherical spruces than for conical ones, pointing at a higher vitality and smaller interactions between climate and growth for spherical spruces. Although the results cannot explain the anomalous crown form, they suggest spherical trees to have a higher ability to cope the warm and dry climate of the region than “regular” conical spruces. We discuss the origin of spherical crowns in terms of population history and phenotypic plasticity and speculate on possible effects of crown architecture on canopy-atmosphere exchange.
  • Schiessl, Department of Genetics, Research and Training Centre for Forests, Natural Hazards and Landscape, Hauptstrasse 7, A-1140 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Grabner, Department of Material Sciences and Process Engineering, Institute of Wood Science and Technology, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Peter-Jordan-Strasse 82, A-1190 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Golesch, Department of Genetics, Research and Training Centre for Forests, Natural Hazards and Landscape, Hauptstrasse 7, A-1140 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Geburek, Department of Genetics, Research and Training Centre for Forests, Natural Hazards and Landscape, Hauptstrasse 7, A-1140 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Schueler, Department of Genetics, Research and Training Centre for Forests, Natural Hazards and Landscape, Hauptstrasse 7, A-1140 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail: silvio.schueler@bfw.gv.at (email)
article id 135, category Research article
Ola Lindroos, Marina Henningsson, Dimitris Athanassiadis & Tomas Nordfjell. (2010). Forces required to vertically uproot tree stumps. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 4 article id 135. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.135
Stumpwood attracts renewed interest due to increased use of forest biomass for bioenergy. In Nordic countries stumps are generally uprooted with crawler excavators, which have strong cranes (ca. 400 kNm gross lift torque), but are not designed for moving in forest terrain. Their use is based on practical experience with available and tested machine types rather than thorough examinations of requirements, partly due to limited knowledge of force requirements for uprooting of stumps. Therefore, in this work mean and maximum forces required to vertically uproot stumps of Norway spruce (Picea abies) and birch (Betula spp.) were quantified together with the effects of various soil types and uprooting methods. The used excavator’s crane-mounted uprooting device enabled comparisons between usage of solely crane force, and a method in which preparatory loosening forces were applied prior to crane force. Uprooting stumps in single pieces proved difficult; 61% split unintentionally. Force requirements were similar across tree species, increasing curve-linearly with stump diameter, and stumps uprooted in a single piece required more force than split stumps. Preparatory loosening reduced crane force requirements and, surprisingly, less force was required to uproot stumps from a mesic, till soil than from a moist, finer-textured soil. No stump required more than 60 kN crane force and functions for maximum force requirements indicate that powerful harvesters and forwarders (gross crane lifting capacity of 273 and 155 kNm, respectively) should be able to uproot all stumps with ≤ 61 cm and ≤ 32 cm diameter, respectively, in one piece. Larger stumps could be managed if it is acceptable that stumps are split before uprooting.
  • Lindroos, Department of Forest Resource Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: ola.lindroos@srh.slu.se (email)
  • Henningsson, Komatsu Forest AB, Box 7124, SE-907 04 Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Athanassiadis, Department of Forest Resource Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Nordfjell, Department of Forest Resource Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 134, category Research article
Dan Bergström, Urban Bergsten & Tomas Nordfjell. (2010). Comparison of boom-corridor thinning and thinning from below harvesting methods in young dense Scots pine stands. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 4 article id 134. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.134
At present, only a small proportion of the potential extractable bioenergy from young dense forests in Sweden is utilized. The conventional mechanized first thinning systems used in such stands suffer from low productivity, so the operation is only profitable in stands with bigger trees and high standing volumes. Conventional harvesters are used for this operation equipped with accumulating felling heads designed for handling several trees during each crane cycle. In thinning from below the felling and bunching work requires many time-consuming non-linear crane movements to avoid felling or damaging of future crop trees. However, higher productivity can be achieved when trees between strip roads are harvested in about 1 m-wide corridors with a length corresponding to the reach of the crane. We refer to this operation as boom-corridor thinning. The objective of this study was to compare felling and bunching productivity in young dense stands when employing thinning from below or boom-corridor thinning. Experiments were performed using a randomized block design involving between 4400 and 18 600 trees x ha-1 with a corresponding average tree size of 7.2 and 3.2 cm dbh, respectively. Based on the average tree being removed at a dbh of 5.7 cm, the productivity (ODt x PW-hour-1) was significant (almost 16%) higher for the boom-corridor thinning than for thinning from below treatment. At the same time, the time taken for the work element “Crane in-between” (the period between the loaded crane starting to move towards a tree and the felling head rapidly slowing down for positioning) was significantly reduced, by almost 17%. The positive results were achieved even though the operator was new to the method. To achieve a significantly higher efficiency during the felling and bunching operation, development of new harvesting equipment and operating techniques seems crucial.
  • Bergström, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Dept of Forest Resource Management, Section of Planning and Operations Management, Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: dan.bergstrom@srh.slu.se (email)
  • Bergsten, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Dept of Forest Resource Management, Section of Planning and Operations Management, Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Nordfjell, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Dept of Forest Resource Management, Section of Planning and Operations Management, Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 133, category Research article
Fumiaki Kitahara, Nobuya Mizoue & Shigejiro Yoshida. (2010). Effects of training for inexperienced surveyors on data quality of tree diameter and height measurements. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 4 article id 133. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.133
Due to the large number of sample plots and variables to be measured, inexperienced surveyors are expected to take field measurements in National Forest Inventories (NFIs). However, very little information exists on the data quality that can be expected from inexperienced surveyors given different levels of training. We evaluated the quality of data produced by inexperienced undergraduate students when measuring the most fundamental variables: tree diameter using a diameter tape and height using an ultrasonic Vertex III hypsometer. We found that a single training session on how to use the instruments and how to reduce measurement errors was insufficient for inexperienced surveyors to achieve measurement quality objectives (MQOs). Providing a single feedback of control team measurements significantly improved data quality, except in the measurements of tree height of broad-leaved trees, but additional feedback did not contribute to further improvement. We propose that field training courses for inexperienced surveyors incorporate a one-day exercise with feedback instruction.
  • Kitahara, Graduate School of Bioresource and Bioenvironmental Science, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Higashiku, Fukuoka 812-8581, Japan ORCID ID:E-mail: bunsho@ffpri.affrc.go.jp (email)
  • Mizoue, Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Yoshida, Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 132, category Research article
Mats Berlin, Lars Lönnstedt, Gunnar Jansson, Öje Danell & Tore Ericsson. (2010). Developing a Scots pine breeding objective: a case study involving a Swedish sawmill. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 4 article id 132. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.132
The aim of this study was to develop a Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) breeding objective for a vertically integrated sawmill in northern Sweden. The production system was defined as comprising the sawmill and the forests supplying it. Volume per hectare, wood density, survival and straightness were used as objective traits and the related selection criteria were measurements, collected at young tree age, of height, diameter, pilodyn penetration, vitality and straightness. A bio-economic model was used to calculate economic weights for the objective traits identified. We also investigated the efficiency of different selection indices based on these economic weights, in combination with available data on genetic parameters. Furthermore, we studied the effect of different discount rates on the calculated economic weights. The results showed that, compared to the full index (which included all selection criteria), omitting either vitality or straightness had a negligible effect, reducing predicted profit gain per hectare by less than one per cent. Height or diameter each had a greater effect, with a loss of predicted profit gain per hectare of up to 6%. Excluding pilodyn penetration from the selection index caused the largest reduction in predicted profit gain per hectare, amounting to over 10%. However, when both height and diameter were removed the predicted profit gain per hectare dropped to one-third of that based on the full index. Finally, ranking and genetic selection for the developed breeding objective was insensitive to changes in the discount rate.
  • Berlin, Skogforsk, Uppsala Science Park, SE-751 83 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: mats.berlin@skogsforsk.se (email)
  • Lönnstedt, Skogforsk, Uppsala Science Park, SE-751 83 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Jansson, Skogforsk, Uppsala Science Park, SE-751 83 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Danell, Skogforsk, Uppsala Science Park, SE-751 83 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Ericsson, Skogforsk, Uppsala Science Park, SE-751 83 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 131, category Research article
Timo Pukkala, Tatu Hokkanen & Teijo Nikkanen. (2010). Prediction models for the annual seed crop of Norway spruce and Scots pine in Finland. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 4 article id 131. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.131
Many studies indicate that the flowering abundance of boreal trees strongly correlates with the weather conditions of the previous summer. This study developed prediction models for the seed crops of Norway spruce and Scots pine using weather variables one and two years prior to flowering year as predictors. Weather data, systematically recorded at many weather stations, were obtained from the Finnish Meteorological Institute. Seed crop monitoring data came from 22 spruce stands and 44 pine stands. In every stand, seed crop has been monitored for many years, the longest continuous period being 45 years. Monthly mean temperatures, monthly rainfalls, and periodical temperature sums were used as predictors in the seed crop models. Generally, both tree species flowered abundantly one year after a warm summer and two years after a cool summer. While the models only explained about 45% of the variation in the annual seed crop, they accurately predicted good and bad seed years: when the models predicted good seed crops the likelihood to have at least a medium seed crop was very high and when the models predicted small seed crops, the likelihood to obtain medium or good seed crop was very low. Therefore, the models reliably predict if a particular year will be a good seed year or a poor seed year. These predictions can be used in forestry practice for proper timing of natural regeneration activities, and when activities in seed orchards are planned.
  • Pukkala, University of Eastern Finland, School of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: timo.pukkala@uef.fi (email)
  • Hokkanen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, P.O. Box 18, FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Nikkanen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Finlandiantie 18, FI-58450 Punkaharju, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 130, category Research article
Yongqing Yang, Yinan Yao & Xuejiang Zhang. (2010). Comparison of growth and physiological responses to severe drought between two altitudinal Hippophae rhamnoides populations. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 4 article id 130. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.130
Growth and physiological differences in response to drought were compared between two sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) populations inhabited in the southeast of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau of China. The experimental design included two water regimes (100% and 25% of field capacity) and two populations from the low and high altitude zone. Our experiments were conducted in a naturally lit greenhouse under semi-controlled environmental conditions for a whole growing season in a dry valley (1800 m above the sea level). We found that drought tolerance is highly related to the plant antioxidant capacity and water use efficiency as well as leaf nutrient status in H. rhamnoides. The highland population (HP) experienced a greater inhibition in plant growth and leaf enlargement, lower leaf nitrogen and phosphorus content, lower root nodule biomass and root mass/foliage area ratio, and higher leaf water content loss paralleling with higher enhancement of abscisic acid level in response to drought, as compared with lowland population (LP). Additionally, reduction of leaf lignin content in HP further reduced its drought tolerance. On the contrary, LP showed effective adaptation strategies such as improvement of water economy and maintaining high ascorbic acid content. Therefore, we conclude that LP was more tolerant to drought than HP, and could be selected for reforestation in the dry valleys of upper Minjiang River regions in China.
  • Yang, Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi, 830011, China & College of Life Sciences, Chongqing Normal University, Chongqing, 400047, China ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Yao, Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi, 830011, China ORCID ID:E-mail: yaoya@ms.xjb.ac.cn (email)
  • Zhang, Institute for Plant Protection and Soil sciences, Hubei Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Wuhan, 430064, China ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 129, category Research article
Mikko Moilanen, Markku Saarinen & Klaus Silfverberg. (2010). Foliar nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium concentrations of Scots pine in drained mires in Finland. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 4 article id 129. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.129
An imbalanced nutrient status in Scots pine stands on drained mires is primarily a consequence of excess nitrogen (N) in relation to mineral nutrients such as phosphorus (P) and potassium (K). In this study, the variation of foliar N, P, and K concentrations relative to some site and environmental characteristics was examined. Foliar nutrient concentrations were determined on needle samples collected from mires representing different drainage ages, site types, geographical locations and annual weather conditions. In the overall data (n = 971 samples in 333 stands) the foliar N concentration varied between 6.7 and 24.2 mg g-1, the P concentration between 0.83 and 2.32 mg g-1, and the K concentration between 2.22 and 6.23 mg g-1. The original (pre-drainage) mire site type proved to be an important factor in explaining the nutrient status of the trees: on originally forested sites, the nutrient balance (N versus K; N versus P) was mostly adequate, whereas on sparsely forested and treeless sites, K deficiency was common. N deficiency was the most common in forested ‘nitrogen-poor’ sites, while P and K deficiencies were more common in originally treeless or sparsely forested ‘nitrogen rich’ sites, where the nutrient imbalance was also the greatest. Over the whole data, 29% of the cases were diagnosed to be N-deficient, 51% P-deficient, and 25% K-deficient. The foliar N concentration increased with increasing temperature sum. The foliar K concentration decreased with increasing depth of the peat layer. On former treeless or sparsely forested sites, foliar K decreased slightly with increasing drainage age. In contrast, on thin-peated sites the foliar P concentration increased with increasing drainage age. The climate conditions (location), the original site type of the mire and peat thickness should be taken into account when planning silvicultural measures on mires drained for forestry.
  • Moilanen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Muhos and Parkano Research Units, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: mikko.moilanen@metla.fi (email)
  • Saarinen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Muhos and Parkano Research Units, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Silfverberg, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Muhos and Parkano Research Units, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 128, category Research article
Shelley L. Hunt, Andrew M. Gordon & Dave M. Morris. (2010). Carbon stocks in managed conifer forests in northern Ontario, Canada. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 4 article id 128. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.128
Carbon pools and net primary productivity (aboveground) were measured in managed stands of jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) and black spruce (Picea mariana [Mill.] B.S.P.), ranging in age from 10 to 53 years, in the Lake Nipigon area of northern Ontario. Organic carbon in the forest floor and surface mineral soil (top 15 cm) ranged from 13 to 46 Mg C ha-1 and 10 to 29 Mg C ha-1, respectively. Carbon in aboveground tree biomass ranged from 11 to 74 Mg C ha-1 in crop trees, and 0 to 11 Mg C ha-1 in non-crop trees. Coarse woody debris (downed woody debris and snags) contained between 1 and 17 Mg C ha-1. Understory vegetation rarely represented more than 1% of total ecosystem carbon accumulation, but was responsible for a larger proportion of aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP). Rates of ANPP (expressed as carbon) ranged from 0.8 to 3.5 Mg C ha-1 y-1. Carbon stocks in managed stands were compared with published values from similarly aged fire-origin stands in the North American boreal region. Carbon stocks in our study stands generally exceeded those in unmanaged fire-origin stands of the same age, due to larger tree and forest floor carbon pools.
  • Hunt, University of Guelph, School of Environmental Sciences, 50 Stone Road East, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G 2W1 ORCID ID:E-mail: shunt@uoguelph.ca (email)
  • Gordon, University of Guelph, School of Environmental Sciences, 50 Stone Road East, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G 2W1 ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Morris, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, Centre for Northern Forest Ecosystem Research, 955 Oliver Rd., Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada P7B 5E1 ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 146, category Research article
Karri Uotila, Juho Rantala, Timo Saksa & Pertti Harstela. (2010). Effect of soil preparation method on economic result of Norway spruce regeneration chain. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 3 article id 146. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.146
Economic result of forest regeneration chains, based either on spot mounding or on disc trenching and planting of Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst.) seedlings, were clarified and compared to each other. First, effects of soil preparation method on early development of Norway spruce stands were measured from field experiments. Second, the effects of soil preparation method on stand level management programs were modelled. The modelling was based on growth simulation and investment calculations. The soil preparation methods substantially affected early development of a stand. The density of the removed trees in early cleaning was 56% higher on the disc-trenched area compared to the spot-mounded area. The difference was especially high (120%), close by (< 25 cm) the remained spruce seedlings. There was also a difference between the methods in the growth of crop spruces; at biological age of 8 years, the mean height of spruce was 110 cm on the spot-mounded area and 68 cm on the disc-trenched area. The differences led to divergent management programs between the areas. The disc-trenched area needed three young stand management operations whereas two was enough at the spot-mounded area. Although disc trenching is a less expensive method than spot mounding, the total management costs were higher in disc trenching than in spot mounding. Furthermore, incomes from the first commercial thinning were higher when regeneration based on spot mounding. At the interest rate of 3%, the investment in spot mounding had 329 EUR ha–1 higher net present value than the investment in disc trenching.
  • Uotila, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Suonenjoki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: karri.uotila@metla.fi (email)
  • Rantala, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Suonenjoki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Saksa, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Suonenjoki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Harstela, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Suonenjoki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 145, category Research article
Jianbang Gan & C. T. Smith. (2010). Coupling greenhouse gas credits with biofuel production cost in determining conversion plant size. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 3 article id 145. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.145
Biofuel plant size is one of the key variables in biofuel supply chain analysis as it plays a pivotal role in controlling the efficacy of both feedstock supply and feedstock-to-biofuel conversion. The unit production cost and greenhouse gas (GHG) balance of biofuels vary with plant size. We develop an analytical framework for integrating biofuel production costs and GHG balance derived from life-cycle analysis into supply chain optimization, followed by its application to ethanol production using forest biomass in the southern United States. We derive formulas for determining the optimal biofuel plant size and the corresponding feedstock supply radius based on the minimization of biofuel production costs less GHG benefits. Our results indicate that though biofuel plant size and feedstock supply radius should be augmented by considering GHG benefits, the GHG price will have a more significant impact on net biofuel production costs than on conversion plant size or feedstock supply radius. With a rise in the GHG price the net biofuel production cost tends to increase while the directions of change in plant size and feedstock supply radius are uncertain, depending upon the costs and GHG emissions of biomass transport and feedstock-to-fuel conversion. Combining GHG offset values with biofuel production costs enables us to more holistically examine the biofuel supply chain.
  • Gan, Department of Ecosystem Science and Management, Texas A&M University, Texas, USA ORCID ID:E-mail: j-gan@tamu.edu (email)
  • Smith, Faculty of Forestry, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 144, category Research article
Markku Oikari, Kalle Kärhä, Teijo Palander, Heikki Pajuoja & Heikki Ovaskainen. (2010). Analyzing the views of wood harvesting professionals related to the approaches for increasing the cost-efficiency of wood harvesting from young stands. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 3 article id 144. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.144
A lot of viable guidelines are currently available for more cost-effective harvesting of energy wood and industrial roundwood (i.e. pulpwood) from young stands. The study ranked the proposed potential approaches for increasing the cost-efficiency of small-diameter (d1.3 < 10 cm) energy wood and industrial roundwood harvesting from early thinnings. Research data, based on a total of 40 personal interviews, was collected in early 2008. The interviewees were divided into four wood harvesting professional groups: 1) Managers in wood procurement organizations, 2) Forest machine contractors, 3) Forest machine manufacturers and vendors, and 4) Wood harvesting researchers. In the opinion of the respondents, there is great potential to increase the cost-efficiency of wood harvesting through improving harvesting conditions (i.e. effective tending of seedling stands, delaying harvesting operations, and pre-clearance of dense undergrowth). The interviewees also underlined that harvesting methods can be rationalized, e.g. multiple-tree handling in industrial roundwood cuttings, crane scale measurement, integrated wood harvesting, and careful selection of stands for harvesting. The strong message given by the interviewees was that the education of forest machine operators must be made more effective in the future. There would be significant possibilities for cost savings in young stands, if methods and techniques with the most potential were utilized completely in wood harvesting.
  • Oikari, Karelwood, Kontiolahti, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: markku.oikari@karelwood.com (email)
  • Kärhä, Metsäteho Oy, Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Palander, University of Eastern Finland, Faculty of Science and Forestry, Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Pajuoja, Metsäteho Oy, Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Ovaskainen, University of Eastern Finland, Faculty of Science and Forestry, Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 143, category Research article
Juha Laitila, Jani Heikkilä & Perttu Anttila. (2010). Harvesting alternatives, accumulation and procurement cost of small-diameter thinning wood for fuel in Central Finland. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 3 article id 143. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.143
This study compared harvesting alternatives, accumulation and procurement costs of small-diameter thinning wood chips for fuel, when trees were harvested either as delimbed stemwood or whole trees. The calculation was made for a hypothetical plant located in Central Finland and the radius of the procurement area was 100 km via the existing road network. Cutting was done with conventional harvester head equipped with multi-tree-handling (MTH) accessories, with the logged trees being chipped at the roadside storage. The cost of delimbed stemwood chips at heating plant was 24% higher compared to the cost of whole tree chips. The availability analysis attested that delimbing lowered the regional cutting removal by 42% compared to the whole tree harvesting, when the minimum accumulation for the fuel fraction at the stand was set at 25 m3/ha. Delimbing diminishes the recovery rate at the site, resulting in a diminishing number of potential recovery sites meeting the threshold volume. However, the study showed that the forest energy potential is increased and procurement costs are reduced, if delimbed stemwood is harvested from stands where the whole tree harvesting is not acceptable due to nutrient loss or for other ecological reasons. Intelligent selection of cutting methods for different stands enables minimization of transport distance and control of procurement cost.
  • Laitila, The Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: juha.laitila@metla.fi (email)
  • Heikkilä, L&T Biowatti Oy, Seinäjoki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Anttila, The Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 142, category Research article
Helmer Belbo. (2010). Comparison of two working methods for small tree harvesting with a multi tree felling head mounted on farm tractor. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 3 article id 142. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.142
In this study, the efficiency of a small multi-tree felling head, mounted on a farm tractor with a timber trailer was studied, when harvesting small trees for energy in thinnings. Both separate loading and direct loading of the felled trees was studied. Time studies were carried out in a mixed stand of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst) and birch (Betula pubescens Ehrh.). The time consumption of the work elements in the different work methods was formulated by regression analysis, where the independent variables were tree size and degree of accumulation. The average size of the harvested trees was 0.035 m3. The time consumption for the harvesting and loading were similar for the two studied methods, 20 minutes per m3 at a tree size of 0.035 m3, but the two methods showed different characteristics for different tree sizes and level of accumulation. The direct loading method had the highest productivity when more than 0.1 m3 were collected in the felling cycle, whereas the separate loading method had the highest productivity when less than 0.05 m3 were collected in the felling cycle. The total effective time consumption for harvesting and forwarding the biomass 300 meters to roadside landing was 27 minutes per m3. The efficiency of the initial felling and collecting of the small trees was the main challenge. Both the harvesting technique and harvesting technology needs further development to provide a feasible production chain for woodfuel from energy thinning.
  • Belbo, Norwegian Forest and Landscape Institute, Box 115, 1431 Ås, Norway ORCID ID:E-mail: helmer.belbo@skogoglandskap.no (email)
article id 141, category Research article
Per Kristian Rørstad, Erik Trømborg, Even Bergseng & Birger Solberg. (2010). Combining GIS and forest modelling in estimating regional supply of harvest residues in Norway. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 3 article id 141. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.141
New and ambitious targets for renewable energy production put attention to increased supply of biomass. Harvest residues are only to a limited extent demanded by the traditional forest industries and represent an unutilized resource for increased production of renewable energy in Norway. The overall objective of this paper is to study how GIS and forest modelling can be combined to improve estimates of the supply of harvest residues, taking different environmental and economic constraints into consideration. The analyses are based on a case study of a forest area of more than 40 000 ha in Southern Norway divided into about 500 private forest properties. The study was carried out by computations of timber harvest using the forestry scenario model SGIS based on extensive forest inventory data at stand level. In the studied area energy utilization of harvest residues is not profitable below an energy price of about EUR 3.2/GJ (NOK 0.10 /kWh) when the distance from roadside to industry is 20 km. Above this level supply increases rapidly over a rather narrow price range and is nearly inelastic above EUR 4.1/GJ (NOK 0.12/kWh). We did not find significant negative shifts in the residues supply caused by changes in location of roundwood harvest over time. Exclusion of collection from stands with a site index (H40) below 14 reduced the potential supply of residues by 16–27%. The optimisation method combined selection of exogenous variables in order to map observed harvesting level and is probably the best approach to map future harvest.
  • Rørstad, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Dept of Ecology and Natural Resource Management, Ås, Norway ORCID ID:E-mail: per.kristian.rorstad@umb.no (email)
  • Trømborg, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Dept of Ecology and Natural Resource Management, Ås, Norway ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Bergseng, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Dept of Ecology and Natural Resource Management, Ås, Norway ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Solberg, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Dept of Ecology and Natural Resource Management, Ås, Norway ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 140, category Research article
Jussi Laurila & Risto Lauhanen. (2010). Moisture content of Norway spruce stump wood at clear cutting areas and roadside storage sites. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 3 article id 140. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.140
Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) stump wood is a potential source of bioenergy in Finland. The heating value of stump wood depends on, among other things, the moisture, carbon and ash content of the wood. In this study the moisture content of Norway spruce stump wood was examined immediately after harvesting at the clear cutting area and after different drying times at the roadside storage sites. Immediately after stump harvesting the average moisture content (wet basis) was 53%. The stump wood dried fairly fast during spring and summer. One month after stump harvesting, the average moisture content was about 31%. If the stump wood had dried well once, water absorption became very weak and the moisture content increased only slightly in the late autumn. Each spring and summer the moisture content of the stumps was lower than during the previous year. Annually the lowest moisture content was observed at the beginning of July and the highest at both the beginning and the end of the year. The moisture content of stump wood followed an upwards opening parabola over a one year period and was repeated each year. Three years after harvesting the heating value of the stump wood was still 5.241 MWh/ton. Overall, when harvesting took place in the spring or early summer, the stump wood was combustible after a one month drying period immediately after harvesting.
  • Laurila, Seinäjoki University of Applied Sciences, School of Agriculture and Forestry, FI-63700 Ähtäri, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: jussi.laurila@seamk.fi (email)
  • Lauhanen, Seinäjoki University of Applied Sciences, School of Agriculture and Forestry, FI-63700 Ähtäri, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 139, category Research article
Ulf Sikström, Curt Almqvist & Gunnar Jansson. (2010). Growth of Pinus sylvestris after the application of wood ash or P and K fertilizer to a peatland in southern Sweden. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 3 article id 139. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.139
The effects of the application of wood ash and of fertilizer regimes including phosphorus (P) and potassium (K), with and without simultaneous addition of nitrogen (N), were investigated on a stand of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) saplings growing on a drained oligotrophic peatland site in southern Sweden. A randomized block design was used. Tree growth and concentrations of various elements in the needles were measured. The addition of similar doses of P (approx. 40 kg P ha–1) from different sources resulted in similar growth responses, amounting to 1.6–1.9 m3 ha–1 yr–1 of stem wood over the 26-year study. The P source was either wood ash (2500 kg d.w. ha–1) or PK-fertilizer (raw phosphate and potassium chloride). In response to several treatments there were both increased numbers of trees and increased growth of individual trees. The high PK-dose (40 kg P ha–1 and 80 kg K ha–1) appeared to result in a larger growth increase than the low dose (20 kg P ha–1 and 40 kg K ha–1). The N treatment had no additional effect on growth. In the control plots, tree growth was more or less negligible (0.04 m3 ha–1 yr–1). After almost 26 years, concentrations of P and K in the needles of treated plants were still higher than in the untreated control plants. Nevertheless, in spite of the elevated P concentration, P appears to limit the growth of Scots pine. In conclusion, after sufficient drainage of this type of peatland site, it is possible for a forest stand to develop to the pole stage if wood ash or PK-fertilizer is applied.
  • Sikström, Skogforsk (The Forestry Research Institute of Sweden), Uppsala Science Park, SE-751 83 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: ulf.sikstrom@skogforsk.se (email)
  • Almqvist, Skogforsk (The Forestry Research Institute of Sweden), Uppsala Science Park, SE-751 83 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Jansson, Skogforsk (The Forestry Research Institute of Sweden), Uppsala Science Park, SE-751 83 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 138, category Research article
Santiago Martín-Alcón, José Ramón González-Olabarría & Lluís Coll. (2010). Wind and snow damage in the Pyrenees pine forests: effect of stand attributes and location. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 3 article id 138. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.138
Wind and snow-induced damage have been analyzed at stand level for three pine forests in the Central-Eastern Pyrenees (Pinus nigra Arn. salzmanii, Pinus sylvestris L. and Pinus uncinata Ram.). Stand-level models have been then developed for the most affected two species, Pinus sylvestris L. and Pinus uncinata Ram., to describe damage severity. The models were based on data from national forest inventory plots. They included variables related to the spatial location and structure of the stands, being validated using a sub-set of the database (25% of the plots randomly selected). Mountain pine forests (Pinus uncinata Ram.) were the most heavily affected by wind and snow disturbances. For both mountain and Scots pine species, topographic exposure and the severity of the local storm regime had an important effect on the degree of damage. Stand’s resistance to wind and snow was found to be dependent on the combined effect of basal area and mean slenderness of the dominant trees. For a given slenderness ratio, damage increased strongly in lower-density stands, particularly in stands with basal areas below 15 m2/ha. Stand structure was particularly important to define the resistance of Scots pine stands, which presented a higher vulnerability to wind and snow under higher degree of even-agedness. The models presented in this study provide empirically-based information that can be used to implement silvicultural practices to minimize the risk of those forests to suffer wind and snow-related damages.
  • Martín-Alcón, Forest Technology Center of Catalonia, Solsona, Lleida, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail: santiago.martin@ctfc.es (email)
  • González-Olabarría, Forest Technology Center of Catalonia, Solsona, Lleida, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Coll, Forest Technology Center of Catalonia, Solsona, Lleida, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 137, category Research article
Alberto Bueno, Julio J. Diez & Mercedes M. Fernández. (2010). Ophiostomatoid fungi transported by Ips sexdentatus (Coleoptera; Scolytidae) in Pinus pinaster in NW Spain. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 3 article id 137. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.137
Ips sexdentatus (Coleoptera; Scolytidae) is one of the main vectors of ophiostomatoid blue stain fungi that can cause mortality of healthy conifers. For this reason, our objective was to identify the fungal species carried by this bark beetle in Maritime pine (Pinus pinaster) in north-western Spain. We collected insects from naturally infected pines placed them on malt extract agar (MEA) and left to walk freely on culture plates. Plant tissues (phloem and xylem) from adult pines were cultivated in moist chambers and also on MEA. At the same time, we inoculated pine logs with living insects in the laboratory. Four ophiostomatoid fungi appeared: Ophiostoma ips, Ophiostoma brunneo-ciliatum, Ceratocystiopsis minuta and Ophiostoma sp., as well as Graphium and Sporothrix imperfect stages. Moreover there were seven saprophytic species: Penicillium sp., Trichoderma sp., Verticillium sp., Mucor sp., Aspergillus niger, Gliocladium viride and Scopulariopsis brevicaulis, and the pathogenic Ophiostoma ips. The fructification percentage of the ophiostomatoid species was low, however; its imperfect stage Sporothrix/Hyalorhinocladiella produced high quantity of conidiophores.
  • Bueno, University of Valladolid, Dept of Agroforestry Sciences, Palencia, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Diez, University of Valladolid, Dept of Agroforestry Sciences, Palencia, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Fernández, University of Valladolid, Dept of Agroforestry Sciences, Palencia, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail: mffernan@agro.uva.es (email)
article id 456, category Research article
Sam B. Coggins, Nicholas C. Coops & Michael A. Wulder. (2010). Improvement of low level bark beetle damage estimates with adaptive cluster sampling. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 2 article id 456. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.456
Detection of low level infestation in forest stands is of principle importance to determine effective control strategies before the attack spread to large areas. Of particular concern is the ongoing mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae (Hopkins) epidemic, which has caused approximately 14 million hectares of damage to lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex. Loud var. latifolia Engl.) forests in western Canada. At the stand level attacked trees are often difficult to locate and can remain undetected until the infestation has become established beyond a small number of trees. As such, methods are required to detect and characterise low levels of attack prior to infestation expansion, to inform management, and to aid mitigation activities. In this paper, an adaptive cluster sampling approach was applied to very fine-scale (20 cm) digital aerial imagery to locate mountain pine beetle damaged trees at the leading edge of the current infestation. Results indicated a mean number of 7.36 infested trees per hectare with a variance of 18.34. In contrast a non-adaptive approach estimated the mean number of infested trees in the same area to be 61.56 infested trees per hectare with a variance of 41.43. Using a relative efficiency estimator the adaptive cluster sampling approach was found to be over two times more efficient when compared to the non-adaptive approach.
  • Coggins, Department of Forest Resources Management, University of British Columbia, 2424 Main Mall, Vancouver, B.C., Canada V6T 1Z4 ORCID ID:E-mail: scoggins@interchange.ubc.ca (email)
  • Coops, Department of Forest Resources Management, University of British Columbia, 2424 Main Mall, Vancouver, B.C., Canada V6T 1Z4 ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Wulder, Canadian Forest Service (Pacific Forestry Centre), Natural Resources Canada, 506 West Burnside Rd., Victoria, B.C., Canada V8Z 1M5 ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 455, category Research article
Seppo Kellomäki, Matti Maajärvi, Harri Strandman, Antti Kilpeläinen & Heli Peltola. (2010). Model computations on the climate change effects on snow cover, soil moisture and soil frost in the boreal conditions over Finland. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 2 article id 455. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.455
This study considered how climate change affects the accumulation of snow, the soil moisture and soil frost at sites without tree cover in boreal conditions in Finland (60°–70°N). An increase of 4.5 °C in annual mean temperature and 20 % in annual precipitation were assumed for Finland by the year 2100 according to A2 emission scenario. Along with climate, the soil type of the permanent inventory plots of the Finnish National Forest Inventory was used. Soil and climate data were combined by using a process-based ecosystem model. Calculations were done for four periods: current climate (1971–2000), near future (2001–2020), mid-term future (2021–2050) and long-term future (2071–2100). According to our simulations, the average monthly duration and depth of snow decreased over the simulation period. However, the increasing precipitation may locally increase the snow depths in the mid-term calculations. In the autumn and winter, the average volumetric soil moisture content slightly increased in southern Finland during the near future, but decreased towards the end of the century, but still remained on a higher level than presently. In northern Finland, the soil moisture in the autumn and winter increased by the end of this century. In the summertime soil moisture decreased slightly regardless of the region. Throughout Finland, the length and the depth of soil frost decreased by the end of the century. In the south, the reduction in the depth was largest in the autumn and spring, while in the mid-winter it remained relatively deep in the middle of the century. In the north, the depth tended to increase during the first two calculation periods, in some areas, even during the third calculation period (2071–2100) due to reduced insulation effects of snow during cold spells. The wintertime increase in soil moisture and reduced soil frost may be reflected to reduced carrying capacity of soil for timber harvesting.
  • Kellomäki, University of Eastern Finland, School of Forest Sciences, Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: seppo.kellomaki@uef.fi (email)
  • Maajärvi, University of Eastern Finland, School of Forest Sciences, Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Strandman, University of Eastern Finland, School of Forest Sciences, Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kilpeläinen, University of Eastern Finland, School of Forest Sciences, Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Peltola, University of Eastern Finland, School of Forest Sciences, Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 158, category Research article
Ville Hallikainen, Mikko Hyppönen, Leena Pernu & Jouni Puoskari. (2010). Family forest owners’ opinions about forest management in northern Finland. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 2 article id 158. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.158
Forest management guidelines changed at the end of the 1990’s in Finland. Biodiversity, visual landscape, water systems, and different forms of forest use are now better taken into account. The objectives, outdoor recreation motives, and attitudes towards the present forest management activities of the non-industrial private forest owners called family forest owners in this article, whose forest holdings are located in northern Finland, were studied. In addition, a forest owner typology based on the above-mentioned motives, objectives, and attitudes was created, and the relationship between the typology and the forest owners’ background was tested. Principal component analysis, log-linear models, canonical correlations, and K-means cluster analysis were used in the data analysis. The results showed that especially commercial timber production, but also multiple-use forestry, is important for forest owners. Non-timber products such as game, berries, and forest mushrooms were considered more important than biodiversity, conservation of endangered species, tourism, and reindeer herding. The current, more ecological forest management activities were widely accepted by the owners. The changes had been perceived in the forest management activities. Close relationships were found between the objectives, attitudes and motives of the forest owners. Those owners who emphasized ecological tourism and multiple-use forestry, more frequently accepted detailed conservation and other “softer” management methods than those who emphasized commercial timber production. Typologies, called conservationists, timber producers, and multi-objective forest owners, were identified. Forest owner’s education and source of income were closely related to their typology. Highly educated forest owners and those who gained their money from tourism belonged to the groups named conservationists or multi-objective owners, whereas those who lived on forestry income represented timber producers.
  • Hallikainen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Eteläranta 55, FI-96301 Rovaniemi, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: ville.hallikainen@metla.fi (email)
  • Hyppönen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Eteläranta 55, FI-96301 Rovaniemi, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Pernu, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Eteläranta 55, FI-96301 Rovaniemi, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Puoskari, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Eteläranta 55, FI-96301 Rovaniemi, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 157, category Research article
Ville Kankaanhuhta, Timo Saksa & Heikki Smolander. (2010). The effect of quality management on forest regeneration activities in privately-owned forests in southern Finland. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 2 article id 157. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.157
This study describes the effect of quality management on forest regeneration activities in privately-owned forests in southern Finland. The study material consists of two mail surveys conducted in 2006 and 2007. The questionnaires were sent to forestry professionals in Forest Owners’ Associations (FOAs), who had either participated (participants) or not (non-participants) in the forest regeneration quality management interventions in years 2000–2006. Quality management interventions of the FOAs included field inventories, feedback meetings, and education sessions about quality techniques. The activities of participant and non-participant FOAs were compared in terms of the available resources, the actions taken, and the aspirations for improvement. In the FOAs, which had participated in quality management, the number of excavator contractors had increased by 16% more than in the non-participant FOAs. The contractors had acquired 23% more soil preparation equipment under the supervision of the participant forestry professionals. The soil preparation method used in conjunction with Norway spruce that had most increased in use was patch mounding. Seedlings that were 1.5 years and older were used by participant forestry professionals in the planting of Norway spruce 11% more than by non-participants. The planting workers had attended 14% more educational sessions, while the use of self-control measurements in soil preparation and planting density had been adopted 10% more frequently under the supervision of the forestry professionals participating in the quality management. A greater interest in obtaining feedback by using quality control inventories was also found among forestry professionals who participated in quality management.
  • Kankaanhuhta, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Juntintie 154, FI-77600 Suonenjoki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: ville.kankaanhuhta@metla.fi (email)
  • Saksa, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Juntintie 154, FI-77600 Suonenjoki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Smolander, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Juntintie 154, FI-77600 Suonenjoki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 156, category Research article
Ilkka Korpela, Hans Ole Ørka, Matti Maltamo, Timo Tokola & Juha Hyyppä. (2010). Tree species classification using airborne LiDAR – effects of stand and tree parameters, downsizing of training set, intensity normalization, and sensor type. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 2 article id 156. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.156
Tree species identification constitutes a bottleneck in remote sensing-based forest inventory. In passive images the differentiating features overlap and bidirectional reflectance hampers analysis. Airborne LiDAR provides radiometric and geometric information. We examined the single-trees-level response of two LiDAR sensors in over 13 000 forest trees in southern Finland. We focused on the commercially important species. Our aims were to 1) explore the relevant LiDAR features and study their dependencies on stand and tree variables, 2) examine two sensors and their fusion, 3) quantify the gain from intensity normalizations, 4) examine the importance of the size of the training set, and 5) determine the effects of stand age and site fertility. A set of 570 semiurban broad-leaved trees and exotic conifers was analyzed to 6) examine the LiDAR signal in the economically less important species. An accuracy of 88 90% was achieved in the classification of Scots pine, Norway spruce, and birch, using intensity variables. Spruce and birch showed the highest levels of confusion. Downsizing the training set from 30% to 2.5% of all trees had only a marginal effect on the performance of classifiers. The intensity features were dependent on the absolute and relative sizes of trees, especially for birch. The results suggest that leaf size, orientation, and foliage density affect the intensity, which is thus not affected by reflectance only. Some of the ecologically important species in Finland may be separable, since they gave rise to high intensity values. Comparison of the sensors implies that performance of the intensity data for species classification varies between sensors for reasons that remained uncertain. Both range and gain receiver normalization improved species classification. Weighting of the intensity values improved the fusion of two LiDAR datasets.
  • Korpela, University of Helsinki, Department of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 27, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: ilkka.korpela@helsinki.fi (email)
  • Ørka, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Department of Ecology and Natural Resource Management, P.O.Box 5003, NO-1432 Ås, Norway ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Maltamo, University of Eastern Finland, School of Forest Science, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Tokola, University of Eastern Finland, School of Forest Science, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Hyyppä, Finnish Geodetic Institute, Department of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, P.O.Box 15, FI-02431 Masala, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 155, category Research article
Minna Räty & Annika Kangas. (2010). Segmentation of model localization sub-areas by Getis statistics. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 2 article id 155. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.155
Models for large areas (global models) are often biased in smaller sub-areas, even when the model is unbiased for the whole area. Localization of the global model removes the local bias, but the problem is to find homogenous sub-areas in which to localize the function. In this study, we used the eCognition Professional 4.0 (later versions called Definies Pro) segmentation process to segment the study area into homogeneous sub-areas with respect to residuals of the global model of the form height and/or local Getis statistics calculated for the residuals, i.e., Gi*-indices. The segmentation resulted in four different rasters: 1) residuals of the global model, 2) the local Gi*-index, and 3) residuals and the local Gi*-index weighted by the inverse of the variance, and 4) without weighting. The global model was then localized (re-fitted) for these sub-areas. The number of resulting sub-areas varied from 4 to 366. On average, the root mean squared errors (RMSEs) were 3.6% lower after localization than the global model RMSEs in sub-areas before localization. However, the localization actually increased the RMSE in some sub-areas, indicating the sub-area were not appropriate for local fitting. For 56% of the sub-areas, coordinates and distance from coastline were not statistically significant variables, in other words these areas were spatially homogenous. To compare the segmentations, we calculated an aggregate standard error of the RMSEs of the single sub-areas in the segmentation. The segmentations in which the local index was present had slightly lower standard errors than segmentations based on residuals.
  • Räty, University of Helsinki, Department of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 27 (Latokartanonkaari 7), FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: minna.s.raty@helsinki.fi (email)
  • Kangas, University of Helsinki, Department of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 27 (Latokartanonkaari 7), FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 154, category Research article
Henrik R. Hallingbäck, Gunnar Jansson, Björn Hannrup & Anders Fries. (2010). Which annual rings to assess grain angles in breeding of Scots pine for improved shape stability of sawn timber? Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 2 article id 154. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.154
The shape stability properties of sawn timber could be improved by breeding or grading Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) for reduced grain angles. Currently, only grain angle assessments performed in single annual rings can be considered feasible in forest breeding programmes. The relevance of such methods in assessing shape stability traits was evaluated by taking grain angle measurements beneath the bark in a 36-year-old Scots pine progeny trial. Several grain angle measurements from stem discs were also taken from a sample of 162 trees. Phenotypic correlations were estimated between grain angle and the bow, crook and twist developed in 316 sawn and dried boards. All single annual ring assessments, including measurements taken directly under the bark, were significantly correlated with twist. The highest correlations (0.60–0.70) were observed in annual rings numbered 8–20 and at distances of 30–70 mm from the pith, indicating those parts of logs where grain angles have the largest impact on twist. These results suggests, that grain angles measured beneath the bark are relevant to the twist of sawn small timber, and that any single annual ring could be chosen for the assessment, provided that the tree diameter is within the 60–140 mm range. No appreciable correlations were observed between grain angles and either crook or bow.
  • Hallingbäck, Dept of Plant Biology and Forest Genetics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: henrik.hallingback@vbsg.slu.se (email)
  • Jansson, The Forestry Research Institute of Sweden, Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Hannrup, The Forestry Research Institute of Sweden, Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Fries, Dept of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 153, category Research article
Dirk Bieker & Steffen Rust. (2010). Non-destructive estimation of sapwood and heartwood width in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.). Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 2 article id 153. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.153
Accurate estimates of the water conducting sapwood area are necessary to scale sapflow measurements to tree and stand level transpiration. We tested a non-destructive method, electric resistivity tomography (ERT), to estimate the area of conductive sapwood in 9 Pinus sylvestris L. trees in lower Saxony, Germany. Tomograms were compared to cross-sections stained with benzidine after harvesting. All tomograms displayed a distinct pattern of low resistivity at the stem perimeter and high resistivity in the stem centre with a steep increase in resistivity in between, assumed to indicate the transition from sapwood to heartwood. The tomograms showed a sapwood width 2 cm smaller than the staining method. This indicates that staining methods overestimate the amount of active sapwood because when heartwood is formed, moisture content decreases before extractive contents reach levels visible by staining. The ERT method is a new powerful method for the non-destructive estimation of sapwood and heartwood width.
  • Bieker, University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Faculty of Resource Management, Büsgenweg 1a, D-37077 Göttingen, Germany ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Rust, University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Faculty of Resource Management, Büsgenweg 1a, D-37077 Göttingen, Germany ORCID ID:E-mail: rust@hawk-hhg.de (email)
article id 152, category Research article
Torgny Persson, Bengt Andersson & Tore Ericsson. (2010). Relationship between autumn cold hardiness and field performance in northern Pinus sylvestris. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 2 article id 152. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.152
Results from 3 artificial freezing tests (one-year-old seedlings) and 15 field trials (9- to 21-year old trees) of half-sib offspring from first generation Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) plus-trees were used to estimate the amount of additive genetic variance for autumn cold hardiness and traits assessed in the field, and the genetic correlations between them. Cold hardiness of individual seedlings was scored visually, based on the discoloration of their needles after freezing in a climate chamber. The field traits analyzed were tree vitality, tree height, spike knot frequency, branch diameter, branch angle, stem straightness, and susceptibility to infection by the pathogenic fungi Phacidium infestans L., Gremmeniella abietina (Lagerb.) Morelet, Melampsora pinitorqua (Braun) Rostr. and Lophodermella sulcigena (Rostr.) Höhn. Narrow sense individual heritabilities varied between 0.30 and 0.54 for autumn cold hardiness, 0 and 0.18 for tree vitality, 0.07 and 0.41 for tree height, and 0.01 and 0.26 for the remaining traits. Based on the results of the artificial freeze tests, our estimates of additive genetic correlations indicate that while early selection for cold hardiness can improve seedling survival rates in the field, it may also reduce growth in mild environments. It also has minor effects on quality traits and attack by common fungal diseases. The results indicate that artificial freeze testing is an appropriate method for identifying suitable clones for establishing seed orchards to supply stock for the reforestation of regions with harsh environments.
  • Persson, Forestry Research Institute of Sweden, Sävar, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: torgny.persson@skogforsk.se (email)
  • Andersson, Forestry Research Institute of Sweden, Sävar, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Ericsson, Forestry Research Institute of Sweden, Sävar, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 151, category Research article
Janne Miettinen, Pekka Helle, Ari Nikula & Pekka Niemelä. (2010). Capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus) habitat characteristics in north-boreal Finland. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 2 article id 151. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.151
This study aimed to identify tools for taking capercaillie habitats into consideration in forest management. This would provide new alternatives for ecologically more sustainable forest management. Capercaillie summer and winter locations, from wildlife monitoring counts (1998–2004) in northern Finland, and reference, non-capercaillie locations were combined with forest planning data, and the area proportions of different landscape classes in an 800-m radius circle surrounding capercaillie and reference locations were compared. Thinning stands (in summer and winter) and spruce mires (in summer) were more abundant in capercaillie habitats than in reference landscapes, whereas e.g. seedling stands, mature stands and waste land areas were less abundant. The relative habitat use was highest in mean tree diameter (DBH) classes from 10.5 to 14.5 cm in summer habitats of adult capercaillie in heath forests, whereas in peatland forests, in brood habitats and in winter habitats it peaked in diameter classes 14.5 to 18.5 cm. The tree layer density was positively associated with the relative habitat use. A trend of lower habitat use was detected in the largest diameters (17–40 cm) in comparison to middle-sized diameters (10–16 cm) in heath forests, but not in peatland forests. Relatively young managed forests (age 30–40 years or more) can form suitable capercaillie habitats in north-boreal forests. However, this suitability is not necessarily permanent. Understorey management, longer rotations and multicohort forest management are suitable tools for capercaillie habitat management, because they can increase the available cover close to the ground, canopy cover, overall forest cover at the landscape scale and bilberry cover.
  • Miettinen, Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: janne.miettinen@rktl.fi (email)
  • Helle, Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Nikula, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Niemelä, University of Turku, Dept of Biology ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 150, category Research article
Sini Eräjää, Panu Halme, Janne S. Kotiaho, Anni Markkanen & Tero Toivanen. (2010). The volume and composition of dead wood on traditional and forest fuel harvested clear-cuts. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 2 article id 150. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.150
Logging residue and cut stumps are increasingly used as a renewable energy source known as forest fuel. Forest fuel harvesting obviously reduces the volume of dead wood and is likely to alter the dead wood composition, but the magnitude of the change is not known. Such information is important for the evaluation of the effects of forest fuel harvesting on biodiversity because a large proportion of forest dwelling species are directly dependent on dead wood. We measured the volume and characteristics of all dead wood units with a minimum diameter of 2 cm and a minimum length of 20 cm on 10 forest-fuel harvested and 10 traditional (control) clear-cuts. The total volume of dead wood at forest fuel harvested and control clear-cuts was 26.0 and 42.3 m3/ha, respectively. The volumes were much greater than expected suggesting that the volume of dead wood on clear-cuts has been underestimated in previous studies. Forest fuel harvested clear-cuts had 42% less branches and 81% less cut stumps than control clear-cuts but there were no differences in the volume of logs and pieces of logs, snags or roots. The volume of fine woody debris was negatively affected by forest fuel harvesting. We conclude that fine woody debris and cut stumps form a considerable resource on clear-cuts that is reduced by forest fuel harvesting. These components of dead wood have potential to be of importance in managed forests and thus deserve more attention in future biodiversity studies.
  • Eräjää, Department of Biological and Environmental Science, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 University of Jyväskylä, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Halme, Department of Biological and Environmental Science, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 University of Jyväskylä, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: panu.halme@jyu.fi (email)
  • Kotiaho, Department of Biological and Environmental Science, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 University of Jyväskylä, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Markkanen, Department of Biological and Environmental Science, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 University of Jyväskylä, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Toivanen, Department of Biological and Environmental Science, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 University of Jyväskylä, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 149, category Research article
Juha Kaitera & Heikki Nuorteva. (2010). Effects of Melampyrum extracts on the growth of axenic cultures of Cronartium flaccidum and Peridermium pini. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 2 article id 149. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.149
For 3–6 months, mycelial colonies cultured from 5 isolates of each of two pine stem rusts (Cronartium flaccidum and Peridermium pini) were grown on nutrient-rich agar supplemented with Melampyrum extracts. Non-autoclaved extracts of M. pratense significantly reduced the growth of P. pini. The growth of C. flaccidum isolates was slightly stimulated after the second month of incubation but after that was inhibited during incubation months 4–6. We observed considerable variation in colony growth, a significant component of which was explained by incubation time, isolate, growth medium and their interaction. Rust species (C. flaccidum or P. pini) was not an important factor in growth variation. While sterilized extracts of M. pratense, M. sylvaticum and M. nemorosum did not significantly affect growth, colonies of C. flaccidum were slightly stimulated, whereas colonies of P. pini were slightly inhibited. Generally, isolates of P. pini grew better and showed a slower rate of degeneration than C. flaccidum on all media.
  • Kaitera, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Northern Finland Regional Unit, FI-91500 Muhos, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: juha.kaitera@metla.fi (email)
  • Nuorteva, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Southern Finland Regional Unit, FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 459, category Research article
Tomi Tulokas & Jawdat Tannous. (2010). Research method and improvement of log rotation in sawmills. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 1 article id 459. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.459
Log rotation studies were performed at 14 Finnish sawmills during the years 2003–2005. In the investigation of automatic log rotation, the materialized degree of log rotation for each log was calculated from photos captured from a digital video recording. Rotation errors (D) for individual logs and again the accuracy of the automatic log rotator was determined from optimized angle values of the log measuring system and materialized angle values calculated from the still photos. The accuracy of the log rotation varied considerably between sawmills. The rotation error average of the automatic log rotation varied from –23.6° to +11.4°. This means that in some cases the logs were under-rotated and in some they were over-rotated, on an average. Standard deviation of the rotation error (s) of the automatic rotator varied from 4.4° to 22.9°. The results of the simulation indicated that the performance of the log rotation system can be improved by adjusting the log rotator control. In addition to the zero degree error on an average rotation (or near to zero), the corrected values have a significantly smaller standard deviation of the rotation error, and the number of correct rotations was significantly higher compared to the situation before the adjusted rotation commands. At Sawmill 1, standard deviation of the rotation error was reduced by 40.9% from 14.9 degrees to 8.8 degrees. At the same time the number of correct rotations (–10°≤ D ≤ +10°) increased 4.0 fold from 20.1% to 79.4%. At Sawmill 2, standard deviation of the rotation error was reduced by 23.8% from 10.5 degrees to 8.0 degrees. At this sawmill, the rate of accepted rotations increased 1.9 fold from 42.6% to 81.0%. According to previous research, 2.5° decrease in standard deviation of the rotation error (from 10.5 to 8.0°) in square sawing means about 0.5% increase in value yield. For example with 10 million Û annual sales of sawn timber this means 50 000 Û extra profit.
  • Tulokas, Centre for Timber Engineering, Edinburgh Napier University, 10 Colinton Road, Edinburgh EH10 5DT, UK ORCID ID:E-mail: tomi.tulokas@lut.fi (email)
  • Tannous, School of Engineering and the Built Environment, Edinburgh Napier University, 10 Colinton Road, Edinburgh EH10 5DT, UK ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 458, category Research article
Sakari Tuominen, Kalle Eerikäinen, Anett Schibalski, Markus Haakana & Aleksi Lehtonen. (2010). Mapping biomass variables with a multi-source forest inventory technique. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 1 article id 458. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.458
Map form information on forest biomass is required for estimating bioenergy potentials and monitoring carbon stocks. In Finland, the growing stock of forests is monitored using multi-source forest inventory, where variables are estimated in the form of thematic maps and area statistics by combining information of field measurements, satellite images and other digital map data. In this study, we used the multi-source forest inventory methodology for estimating forest biomass characteristics. The biomass variables were estimated for national forest inventory field plots on the basis of measured tree variables. The plot-level biomass estimates were used as reference data for satellite image interpretation. The estimates produced by satellite image interpretation were tested by cross-validation. The results indicate that the method for producing biomass maps on the basis of biomass models and satellite image interpretation is operationally feasible. Furthermore, the accuracy of the estimates of biomass variables is similar or even higher than that of traditional growing stock volume estimates. The technique presented here can be applied, for example, in estimating biomass resources or in the inventory of greenhouse gases.
  • Tuominen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, P.O. Box 18, FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: sakari.tuominen@metla.fi (email)
  • Eerikäinen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu Research Unit, P.O. Box 68, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Schibalski, University of Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Strasse 24–25, 14476 Potsdam, Germany ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Haakana, Finnish Forest Research Institute, P.O. Box 18, FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Lehtonen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, P.O. Box 18, FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 457, category Research article
Karin Öhman & Ljusk Ola Eriksson. (2010). Aggregating harvest activities in long term forest planning by minimizing harvest area perimeters. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 1 article id 457. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.457
The study presents a new approach for aggregating stands for harvest in strategic forest planning. In fragmented landscapes this could benefit nature conservation as well as reduce costs. The approach is built on the idea of minimizing the outside perimeter of contiguous harvest areas. The formulation allows for the use of exact solution methods such as mixed integer programming. The method was tested in a landscape consisting of 2821 stands. The application showed that large and compact harvest areas were created with limited sacrifice of financial value. The mixed integer programs were in most cases solved within a couple of hours. The method needs to be tested on different landscapes with different degrees of fragmentation. It is also necessary to evaluate the long term consequences of the large clear cuts that appear to be a consequence of this problem formulation.
  • Öhman, SLU, Department of Forest Resource Management, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: karin.ohman@srh.slu.se (email)
  • Eriksson, SLU, Department of Forest Resource Management, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 167, category Research article
Berit H. Lindstad & Birger Solberg. (2010). Assessing national compliance with international forest policy processes – the role of subjective judgments. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 1 article id 167. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.167
Several international policy processes with sustainable forest management (SFM) as a common goal have emerged during the past two decades. Based on an empirical study from Norway, this paper analyses the role of subjective judgments in assessing national compliance with three international forest policy processes, and the implications for determination of the effects of these processes. The Expanded Programme of Work on Forest Biological Diversity, the Ministerial Conference on the Protection of Forests in Europe and the United Nations Forum on Forests, including its predecessors, collectively provide more than 600 recommendations for SFM. While it is nothing new that SFM encompasses value questions, this paper is a systematic review of where in a process of assessing national compliance the role of judgments is most profound. The paper shows that the multiple objectives of the forest recommendations, references to national circumstances and provisions for stakeholder involvement lead to differing opinions about the degree of conformity between international recommendations and national situation, i.e. compliance. These differing opinions mean different prospects for the international processes to have effects, because only implementation, or active responses to international recommendations, constitutes effects. The roles of judgments and values are recommended topics for further investigation. Factors influencing how compliance is assessed, and consequently the degree to which implementation is deemed necessary, require specific attention. Due consideration to substantive and methodological choices in determining national changes and in separation of other sources of influence will provide a better basis for informed discussion of compliance with and effects of international forest-related policy processes.
  • Lindstad, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Department of Ecology and Natural Resource Management, Ås, Norway ORCID ID:E-mail: berit.lindstad@umb.no (email)
  • Solberg, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Department of Ecology and Natural Resource Management, Ås, Norway ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 166, category Research article
Kim Pingoud, Johanna Pohjola & Lauri Valsta. (2010). Assessing the integrated climatic impacts of forestry and wood products. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 1 article id 166. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.166
Managed forests serve as a store of carbon (C) and a renewable source of energy and materials. By using forest products as substitutes for fossil fuels or non-renewable materials, emissions from fossil C sources can be displaced. The efficiency of emissions displacement depends on the product, its lifecycle and the fossil-fuel based reference system that is substituted. Forest management practices have an impact on C stocks in biomass and on the annual supply of products and their mix. There are trade-offs between sequestering C stocks in forests and the climatic benefits obtained by sustainable forest harvesting and using wood products to displace fossil C emissions. This article presents an integrated, steady-state analysis comparing various equilibrium states of managed forests and wood product pools that represent sustainable long-term forestry and wood-use strategies. Two climatic indicators are used: the combined C stock in forests and wood products and the fossil C emissions displaced annually by harvested wood products. The study indicates that long-term strategies could be available that are better according to both indicators than forestry practices based on the existing silvicultural guidelines in Finland. These strategies would involve increasing the basal area and prolonging rotations to produce more sawlogs. Further, the climate benefits appear to be highest in case the sawlog supply is directed to production of long-lived materials substituting for fossil-emission and energy intensive materials and recycled after their useful life to bioenergy.
  • Pingoud, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT, Espoo, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: kim.pingoud@vtt.fi (email)
  • Pohjola, University of Helsinki, Department of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 27, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Valsta, University of Helsinki, Department of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 27, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 165, category Research article
Yrjö Nuutinen, Kari Väätäinen, Antti Asikainen, Robert Prinz & Jaakko Heinonen. (2010). Operational efficiency and damage to sawlogs by feed rollers of the harvester head. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 1 article id 165. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.165
In mechanical cutting, deep damage caused by feed rollers can reduce the yield of good quality timber for the sawmill and plywood industries. Additionally the feeding and energy efficiency of feed rollers are important for the profitability of harvester cutting. The objectives of this study were to compare the damages to sawlogs, as well as the time and fuel consumption of stem feeding with six different steel feed rollers during the processing of stems using a single grip harvester. This study tested two rollers with big spikes, two rollers with small spikes, one roller with studs in v-angle and one roller with adaptable steel plates in the ring of the roller. A highly detailed, and accurate processing and fuel consumption projection was recorded using the harvester’s automated data collector on a log and stem level. The roller adaptable plate averaged, for unbarked sawlogs, the lowest damages of 3.7 mm. While the damages of the roller with big spikes were the deepest with an average of 7.8 mm. For medium stems, volume of 0.35 m3, the range of differences between the maximum and minimum effective feeding time per roller was 6–19%, which would increase the effective time consumption of cutting by 1–3%. Corresponding differences in fuel consumption during total stem processing were in the range of 7–15%. According to this study it can be concluded that the traditional rollers with spikes were most effective in processing and fuel consumption, but at the same time they caused the deepest damages to the sawlogs. The roller type with adaptable steel plates was the most effective for small stems, additionally it also caused the least damage to the sawlogs.
  • Nuutinen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu Research Unit, P.O. Box 68, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: yrjo.nuutinen@metla.fi (email)
  • Väätäinen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu Research Unit, P.O. Box 68, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Asikainen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu Research Unit, P.O. Box 68, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Prinz, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu Research Unit, P.O. Box 68, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Heinonen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu Research Unit, P.O. Box 68, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 164, category Research article
Aki Suvanto & Matti Maltamo. (2010). Using mixed estimation for combining airborne laser scanning data in two different forest areas. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 1 article id 164. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.164
Airborne laser scanning (ALS) data have become the most accurate remote sensing technology for forest inventories. When planning new inventories the costs of fieldwork could be reduced if datasets of old inventory areas are effectively reused in the new area. The aim of this study was to apply mixed estimation using a combination of existing and new field datasets in area-based approach. Additionally, combining datasets with mixed estimation was compared with constructing new local models with smaller datasets. The two forest study areas were in Juuka and Matalansalo, which are located about 120 km apart in eastern Finland. ALS-based regression models were constructed using datasets of Matalansalo (472 reference plots) and Juuka (10–212 reference plots). Models were developed for the basal area median tree diameter and height, mean tree height, stem number, basal area and volume. The work was based on a simulation approach which involved five methods for approximating the regression coefficients. The first method merged the datasets using ordinary least squares (OLS) regression models, whereas the second and third methods combined datasets using mixed estimation on different weighting principles, and the final two estimated local models with predetermined and new independent variables. The results indicate that mixed estimation can improve the accuracy of derived stand variables compared with basic OLS models. Additionally, a sample of 40–50 plots was enough to build local models for basal area and volume and produce at least the equal accuracy of results than any other methods in this study.
  • Suvanto, Blom Kartta Oy, Teollisuuskatu 18, FI-80100 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: aki.suvanto@blomasa.com (email)
  • Maltamo, University of Eastern Finland, School of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box, FI-80101, Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 163, category Research article
Blas Mola-Yudego. (2010). Regional potential yields of short rotation willow plantations on agricultural land in Northern Europe. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 1 article id 163. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.163
The development of short rotation forestry for bioenergy requires accurate and reliable yield estimates. This paper analyses the current, expected and potential regional productivity of short rotation willow plantations for six countries in Northern Europe. The estimations for present productivity are based on empirical models, using data regarding management, and local productivity based on the regional cereal yields. The estimates of expected yield rely on the current trends of yield increase from commercial willow plantations in the region. The estimates for potential yield are based on climatic restrictions. The results show potential average yields of 9.5, 6.8, 7.9, 9.0, 9.3, and 8.0 odt ha–1 yr–1 for Denmark, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Sweden, respectively. The results of the study also show that there is a wide regional variation between the different countries. In Denmark, Finland and Sweden there is a convergence between the future forecasts and the climatic potential yields in the areas of high productivity. The Baltic countries seem to present lower estimates of present productivity, reflecting possible socio-economic restrictions, although they show a high biomass potential. The methods presented in this study can be further developed in other areas where willow cultivation is considered, and can serve as a basis for future economic considerations.
  • Mola-Yudego, University of Eastern Finland, School of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: blas.mola@uef.fi (email)
article id 162, category Research article
Ruut Rabinowitsch-Jokinen & Ilkka Vanha-Majamaa. (2010). Immediate effects of logging, mounding and removal of logging residues and stumps on coarse woody debris in managed boreal Norway spruce stands. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 1 article id 162. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.162
Wood fuel production has increased remarkably, but its environmental effects within the forest ecosystem have not yet been studied much. We investigated the immediate effects of two series of forest management treatments, which produce timber and forest chips, on the volume and decay classes of coarse woody debris (CWD). One of the treatment series included logging and residue harvesting (LRH) and mounding (M), while the other series included LRH and mounding combined with stump harvesting (MSH). We hypothesized that, i) LRH reduces CWD, excluding stumps; ii) the more intense the soil preparation treatment is, M vs. MSH, the more CWD is destroyed; iii) both LRH and soil preparation treatments (M and MSH) reduce the occurence of snags, highly decayed CWD and deciduous CWD in particular. Ten sample plots in mature managed Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.) dominated forests were located in Southern Finland. The total volume of CWD on the sample plots was measured three times: before and after LRH, and after M or MSH. LRH significantly decreased the volume of snags and the combined volume of snags and logs. MSH significantly decreased the total volume of CWD, while M had no significant effect on the volume of CWD. The middle and highly decayed CWD were destroyed most easily in the treatments.
  • Rabinowitsch-Jokinen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa Research Unit, P.O. Box 18, FI-01301, Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Vanha-Majamaa, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa Research Unit, P.O. Box 18, FI-01301, Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: ilkka.vanha-majamaa@metla.fi (email)
article id 161, category Research article
Mika Nieminen, Erkki Ahti, Harri Koivusalo, Tuija Mattsson, Sakari Sarkkola & Ari Laurén. (2010). Export of suspended solids and dissolved elements from peatland areas after ditch network maintenance in south-central Finland. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 1 article id 161. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.161
In Finland nearly 6 million hectares of peatlands are drained for forestry purposes. Ditch network maintenance in the drained peatlands, i.e. cleaning old ditches or digging complementary ditches, deteriorates surface water quality by increasing the export of dissolved elements and suspended solids (SS). Effect of ditch network maintenance on the export of SS, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and dissolved nitrogen (N), phosphorous (P), iron (Fe), aluminum (Al) and manganese (Mn) was studied in nine pairs of treated and control (no maintenance) catchments located in southern and central Finland. In this study we extended the paired catchment approach by combining data from several catchments and identifying the treatment effect on SS and element loads from the entire dataset. Following the method of Laurén et al. (2009) we identified how uncertainty in correlation between treatment and control catchments during pre-treatment period is reflected in the estimated treatment effect on SS and element loads. In the experiment, the export of SS increased significantly for the four year study period following the ditch network maintenance and Al export increased for one year. The export of N, P and Fe was not significantly changed and DOC and Mn export decreased after the ditch maintenance operation.
  • Nieminen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa Research Unit, P.O. Box 18, FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: mika.nieminen@metla.fi (email)
  • Ahti, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa Research Unit, P.O. Box 18, FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Koivusalo, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Aalto University School of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 15200, FI-00076 Aalto, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Mattsson, Finnish Environment Institute, P.O. Box 140, FI-00251 Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Sarkkola, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa Research Unit, P.O. Box 18, FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Laurén, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu Research Unit, P.O. Box 68, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 160, category Research article
Fan Yang & Ling-Feng Miao. (2010). Adaptive responses to progressive drought stress in two poplar species originating from different altitudes. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 1 article id 160. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.160
Cuttings of Populus kangdingensis C. Wang et Tung and Populus cathayana Rehder, originating from high and low altitudes in the eastern Himalaya, respectively, were examined during one growing season in a greenhouse to determine the effects of progressive drought stress. The results manifested that the adaptive responses to progressive drought stress were different in these two species from different altitudes. Significant changes in stem height, leaf development, relative water content (RWC), malondialdehyde (MDA) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) appeared earlier in P. cathayana than in P. kangdingensis, whereas changes in soluble protein, soluble sugar, free proline and antioxidant enzymes appeared earlier in P. kangdingensis. In addition, changes in these parameters became more and more significant when the drought stress progressed, especially under severe drought stress in P. cathayana. Plant growth showed significant positive correlations with soluble proteins and sugars, free proline and antioxidants and a significant negative correlation with RWC under water stressed treatment in two poplar species. Compared with P. cathayana, P. kangdingensis was able to maintain a superior height growth and leaf development under drought stress. Also, P. kangdingensis possessed greater increments in soluble protein, soluble sugar, free proline and antioxidant enzymes, but lower increments in MDA and H2O2 than did P. cathayana when the cuttings were exposed to progressive drought stress. Our results suggest that P. kangdingensis originating from the high altitude has a better drought tolerance than does P. cathayana originating from the low altitude. Furthermore, this study manifested that acclimation to drought stress are related the rapidity, severity, duration of the drought event and the altitude of two poplar species.
  • Yang, Wuhan Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei 430074, P. R. China (yangfan@wbgcas.cn) & Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 416, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041, P. R. China ORCID ID:E-mail: fanyangmlf6303@163.com (email)
  • Miao, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei 430071, P. R. China ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 159, category Research article
Johan Stendahl, Maj-Britt Johansson, Erik Eriksson, Åke Nilsson & Ola Langvall. (2010). Soil organic carbon in Swedish spruce and pine forests – differences in stock levels and regional patterns. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 1 article id 159. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.159
The selection of tree species is one factor to consider if we want to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere through forest management. The objectives of this study were to estimate the differences in soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks under Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) forests and to examine causes of differences in the accumulation of carbon in the forest soil. Large-scale inventory data was used to quantify variations in SOC stock in relation to stand type and the accumulation of carbon for spruce and pine stands was analysed by simulation. Based on field data, the national mean SOC stock was 9.2 kg m–2 in spruce dominated stands and 5.7 kg m–2 in pine dominated stands. For both species, the SOC stock, measured in the field inventory, increased significantly with increasing temperature, although at different rates. The SOC stock was larger for spruce under all temperature conditions, but the difference between species diminished with increasing temperature. The simulations indicated that the build-up of SOC over several rotations was 22% higher in spruce stands than in pine stands under similar environmental conditions. The main difference was found to be the greater input of harvest residues for spruce. Further, the simulations showed that ground vegetation contributed considerably more to the litter production under pine than under spruce. On sites where both Scots pine and Norway spruce are considered suitable, the latter should be selected if the aim of the forest management policy is to maximize the accumulation of SOC in the forest. Further, spruce is more favourable for SOC accumulation in areas with cold temperatures and on sites with low productivity.
  • Stendahl, Department of Soil and Environment, P.O. Box 7001, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: johan.stendahl@mark.slu.se (email)
  • Johansson, Department of Soil and Environment, P.O. Box 7001, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Eriksson, Department of Energy and Technology, P.O. Box 7061, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Nilsson, Department of Soil and Environment, P.O. Box 7001, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Langvall, Unit for Field-based Forest Research, Asa Experimental Forest and Research Station, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-36030 Lammhult, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:

Category: Review article

article id 147, category Review article
Arja Lilja, Marja Poteri, Raija-Liisa Petäistö, Risto Rikala, Timo Kurkela & Risto Kasanen. (2010). Fungal diseases in forest nurseries in Finland. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 3 article id 147. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.147
Norway spruce (Picea abies), Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and silver birch (Betula pendula) are the major tree species grown in Finnish forest nurseries where 99% of the seedlings are grown in containers first in plastic-covered greenhouses and later outdoors. The main diseases on conifer seedlings are Scleroderris canker (Gremmeniella abietina), Sirococcus blight and cankers (Sirococcus conigenum), snow blights (Herpotrichia juniperi and Phacidium infestans) and needle casts (Lophodermium seditiosum and Meria laricis). Also grey mould (Botrytis cinerea) and birch rust (Melampsoridium betulinum) are among the diseases to be controlled with fungicides. During last years Scleroderris canker has been a problem on Norway spruce, which has been since 2000 the most common species produced in Finnish nurseries. Root die-back (uninucleate Rhizoctonia sp.) on container-grown spruce and pine was a problem in the 1990s. Today the disease has become less common in modern nurseries due to improvements in hygiene and cultivation practice. Since 1991 stem lesions and top dying caused by Phytophthora cactorum has been a problem on birch. The ongoing climate change has already had effect on rusts and powdery mildews as well as other fungi infecting leaves. All diseases, which gain high precipitation and warm and long autumns. For same reasons winter stored seedlings need sprayings against grey mold. Fungal infections are also possible during short-day (SD) treatment, that is necessary for summer and autumn plantings and a beneficial step prior freezing temperatures outside or in freezer storage. Growers are encouraged to use cultural and integrated pest management techniques such as better nursery hygiene, including removing plant debris in nursery growing areas and hot water washing of containers plus removal of diseased, spore-producing seedlings and trees around the nursery.
  • Lilja, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: arja.lilja@metla.fi (email)
  • Poteri, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Suonenjoki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Petäistö, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Suonenjoki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Rikala, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Suonenjoki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kurkela, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kasanen, University of Helsinki, Department of Forest Sciences, Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:

Category: Research note

article id 136, category Research note
Tomasz D. Mazgajski, Michal Zmihorski & Katarzyna Abramowicz. (2010). Forest habitat loss and fragmentation in Central Poland during the last 100 years. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 4 article id 136. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.136
The process of habitat fragmentation consists of two components – habitat loss and fragmentation per se. Both are thought to be among the most important threats to biodiversity. However, the biological consequences of this process such as species occurrence, abundance, or genetic structure of population are driven by current, as well as previous, landscape configurations. Therefore, historical analyses of habitat distribution are of great importance in explaining the current species distribution. In our analysis, we describe the forest fragmentation process for an area of 178 km2 in the northern part of Mazowsze region of central Poland. Topographical maps from the years 1890, 1957 and 1989 were used. Over the 100-year period, forest coverage in this area changed from 17% to 5.6%, the number of patches increased from 19 to 42, while the area of the forest interior decreased from 1933 ha to 371 ha. The two components of fragmentation were clearly separated in time. Habitat loss occurred mainly during the first period (1890–1957) and fragmentation per se in the second (1957–1989). Moreover, we recorded that only 47.7% of all the currently (in 1989) afforested areas constitute sites where forests previously occurred (in 1890 and 1957). For forest dwelling organisms characterized by low dispersal abilities, the effective forest coverage seems to be a half of the real forest area in the studied landscape. New afforestations should be planned especially to increase those patches which contain ancient forest, where various plants and animals sensitive to fragmentation may have survived.
  • Mazgajski, Polish Academy of Sciences, Museum & Institute of Zoology, Wilcza 64, PL 00-679 Warsaw, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: mazgaj@miiz.waw.pl (email)
  • Zmihorski, Polish Academy of Sciences, Museum & Institute of Zoology, Wilcza 64, PL 00-679 Warsaw, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Abramowicz, Department of Ecology, University of Warsaw, Banacha 2, PL 02-097 Warsaw, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 148, category Research note
Ola Lindroos, Magnus Matisons, Petter Johansson & Tomas Nordfjell. (2010). Productivity of a prototype truck-mounted logging residue bundler and a road-side bundling system. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 3 article id 148. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.148
When recovering logging residues (LR) for bioenergy its density should be increased before road transport, otherwise a low proportion of the trucks’ load capacity will be used. One way this can be currently done is to compress LR into bundles that are forwarded to roadside landing. A less well-developed alternative is to forward loose LR and bundle it at landing. In the presented study, a prototype specifically developed for road-side bundling was found to produce larger, heavier bundles than bundling machinery intended for in-field use (mean length, diameter and raw bulk density 4.7 m, 0.8 m and 285 kg m–3, respectively, with 299–445 kg oven dry matter per bundle). The machine was also at least 30% more productive than previously described in-field bundling systems, producing 14–19 bundles per productive work hour (PWh), equivalent to 5.2–7.8 oven-dry tonnes PWh–1. Bundles were estimated to use 67–86% of an LR truck’s 30 tonnes load capacity, similar to proportions used when transporting loose LR. However, a continuous feeding and compressing process would probably almost double productivity, while longer bundles would enable full use of truck load capacity. With such improvements bundling at road-side could provide a viable alternative to current LR-recovering systems.
  • Lindroos, Department of Forest Resource Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: ola.lindroos@srh.slu.se (email)
  • Matisons, Department of Forest Resource Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Johansson, Sveaskog Förvaltnings AB, Vindeln, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Nordfjell, Department of Forest Resource Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:

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