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Rebecca Ralston, Joseph Buongiorno (email), Jeremy S. Fried

Potential yield, return, and tree diversity of managed, uneven-aged Douglas-fir stands

Ralston R., Buongiorno J., Fried J.S. (2004). Potential yield, return, and tree diversity of managed, uneven-aged Douglas-fir stands. Silva Fennica vol. 38 no. 1 article id 435. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.435

Abstract

The effects of different management regimes on uneven-aged Douglas-fir stands in the Pacific Northwest of the United States were predicted with a simulation model. Management alternatives were defined by residual stand structure and cutting cycle. The residual stand structure was set by basal area–diameter-q-ratio (BDq) distributions, diameter-limit cuts (assuming concurrent stand improvement), or the current diameter distribution. Cutting cycles of 10 or 20 years were applied for 200 years. The current diameter distribution was defined as the average of the uneven-aged Douglas-fir stands sampled in the most recent Forest Inventory and Analysis conducted in Oregon and Washington. Simulation results were compared in terms of financial returns, timber productivity, species group diversity (hardwoods vs softwoods), size class diversity, and stand structure. Other things being equal, there was little difference between 10- and 20-year cutting cycles. The highest financial returns were obtained with either a 58.4 cm diameter-limit cut, or a BDq distribution with 8.4 m2 of residual basal area, a 71.1 cm maximum diameter, and a q-ratio of 1.2. Using the current stand state as the residual distribution was the best way to obtain high tree size diversity, and high species group diversity. Several uneven-aged regimes gave net present values comparable to that obtained by converting the initial, uneven-aged stand to an even-aged, commercially thinned, plantation.

Keywords
uneven-aged management; Douglas-fir; WestPro; simulation; economics; diversity

Author Info
  • Ralston, Dept of Forest Ecology and Management, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA ORCID ID:
  • Buongiorno, Dept of Forest Ecology and Management, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA ORCID ID:E-mail jbuongio@facstaff.wisc.edu (email)
  • Fried, USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Forest Experiment Station, Forest Inventory and Analysis Program, P.O. Box 3890, Portland, OR 97208, USA ORCID ID:

Received 9 May 2003 Accepted 16 September 2003 Published 31 December 2004

Available at https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.435 | Download PDF

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