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Erkki Pulliainen, Kalevi Loisa, Tauno Pohjalainen

Hirven talvisesta ravinnosta Itä-Lapissa.

Pulliainen E., Loisa K., Pohjalainen T. (1968). Hirven talvisesta ravinnosta Itä-Lapissa. Silva Fennica vol. 2 no. 4 article id 4775. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a14560

English title: Winter food of the moose (Alces alces) in eastern Lapland.

Abstract

The winter food of moose (Alces alces L.) was examined in 1967-68 in the Saariselkä fell area in the communes of Inari and Sodankylä, in the northern parts of the communes of Salla and Savukoski, and in the central part of the commune of Salla in eastern Lapland in Finland.

In northern parts of Salla and Savukoski 25 moose were followed during 3.-13.4.1968. This area is typical wintering terrain of moose in north-east Lapland. According to the estimate, 45% food taken by the moose was Scots pine shoots and needles, 28% birch, 17% juniper sprigs and needles, 9% willow, and 1.5% bear moss. According to observations of the researchers in 26.1.-16.5.1968, moose seemed to avoid birch, even if it was available in the area, and eat Scots pine shoots and needles and juniper.

Moose seemed to prefer willow in as a winter feed in the southern part of the area studied, where it accounts according to the present and earlier studies 50-90% of the winter food. In the northern wintering areas of moose, where willow is not as common, willow seemed to account for less than 10% of the winter food. There Scots pine is the most important winter food for moose.

The PDF includes a summary in English.

Original keywords
hirvi; talvilaidun; talviravinto; paju; mänty; kataja

English keywords
Alces alces; moose; winter food; feeding; willow; Lapland; feeding behaviour; scots pine; juniper

Published in 1968

Available at https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a14560 | Download PDF

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