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Articles containing the keyword 'crown architecture'

Category: Article

article id 5347, category Article
Timo Kuuluvainen, Markku Kanninen, Juha-Pekka Salmi. (1988). Tree architecture in young Scots pine: properties, spatial distribution and relationships of components of tree architecture. Silva Fennica vol. 22 no. 2 article id 5347. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15504
Keywords: Pinus sylvestris; crown architecture; biomass production; branching pattern; tree ideotype
Abstract | View details | Full text in PDF | Author Info

The architecture of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) was studied in an eight-year-old progeny test. The measurements included characteristics of crown structure, spatial distribution of shoots and yield components. The spatial distribution of shoots showed striking between-tree differences, and two extreme distribution patterns were detected. One represented a non-layered structure with a vertically relative even shoot distribution, and the other a layered structure with a vertically highly uneven shoot distribution.

Close correlations existed between several components of tree architecture and it is suggested that changes in the phenotypic architecture in Scots pine follow an epigenetic pattern, which enables the prediction of adaptational changes in structural components. The structural characteristics related to high above-ground biomass were a long crown, high total shoot length, high number of branches per whorl and big shoots of low needle density occupying a big share of the crown volume.

The PDF includes a summary in Finnish.

  • Kuuluvainen, E-mail: tk@mm.unknown (email)
  • Kanninen, E-mail: mk@mm.unknown
  • Salmi, E-mail: js@mm.unknown

Category: Research article

article id 10550, category Research article
Miro Demol, Phil Wilkes, Pasi Raumonen, Sruthi M. Krishna Moorthy, Kim Calders, Bert Gielen, Hans Verbeeck. (2022). Volumetric overestimation of small branches in 3D reconstructions of Fraxinus excelsior. Silva Fennica vol. 56 no. 1 article id 10550. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.10550
Keywords: aboveground biomass; crown architecture; LIDAR; quantitative structure models; common ash; woody tree volume
Highlights: We compare branch diameter and tree woody volume estimates from terrestrial laser scanning data with manual measurements of two Fraxinus excelsior trees; Smaller branch diameters are generally overestimated due to scattering and misalignment errors in the point cloud; Consequently, tree woody volume is overestimated by 38% to 52%; Filtering by reflectance and improved alignment partly mitigate this effect.
Abstract | Full text in HTML | Full text in PDF | Author Info

Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) has been applied to estimate forest wood volume based on detailed 3D tree reconstructions from point cloud data. However, sources of uncertainties in the point cloud data (alignment and scattering errors, occlusion, foliage...) and the reconstruction algorithm type and parameterisation are known to affect the reconstruction, especially around finer branches. To better understand the impacts of these uncertainties on the accuracy of TLS-derived woody volume, high-quality TLS scans were collected in leaf-off conditions prior to destructive harvesting of two forest-grown common ash trees (Fraxinus excelsior L.; diameter at breast height ~28 cm, woody volume of 732 and 868 L). We manually measured branch diameters at 265 locations in these trees. Estimates of branch diameters and tree volume from Quantitative Structure Models (QSM) were compared with these manual measurements. The accuracy of QSM branch diameter estimates decreased with smaller branch diameters. Tree woody volume was overestimated (+336 L and +392 L) in both trees. Branches measuring < 5 cm in diameter accounted for 80% and 83% of this overestimation respectively. Filtering for scattering errors or improved coregistration approximately halved the overestimation. Range filtering and modified scanning layouts had mixed effects. The small branch overestimations originated primarily in limitations in scanner characteristics and coregistration errors rather than suboptimal QSM parameterisation. For TLS-derived estimates of tree volume, a higher quality point cloud allows smaller branches to be accurately reconstructed. Additional experiments need to elucidate if these results can be generalised beyond the setup of this study.

  • Demol, CAVElab – Computational and Applied Vegetation Ecology, Department of Environment, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium; PLECO – Plants and Ecosystems, Faculty of Science, Antwerp University, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk, Belgium ORCID https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5492-2874 E-mail: miro.demol@ugent.be (email)
  • Wilkes, UCL Department of Geography, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK; NERC National Centre for Earth Observation (NCEO), UK ORCID https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6048-536X E-mail: p.wilkes@ucl.ac.uk
  • Raumonen, Mathematics, Tampere University, FI-33101 Tampere, Finland ORCID https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5471-0970 E-mail: pasi.raumonen@tuni.fi
  • Krishna Moorthy, CAVElab – Computational and Applied Vegetation Ecology, Department of Environment, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium ORCID https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6838-2880 E-mail: Sruthi.KrishnaMoorthyParvathi@ugent.be
  • Calders, CAVElab – Computational and Applied Vegetation Ecology, Department of Environment, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium ORCID https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4562-2538 E-mail: kim.calders@ugent.be
  • Gielen, PLECO – Plants and Ecosystems, Faculty of Science, Antwerp University, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk, Belgium ORCID https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4890-3060 E-mail: bert.gielen@uantwerpen.be
  • Verbeeck, CAVElab – Computational and Applied Vegetation Ecology, Department of Environment, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium ORCID https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1490-0168 E-mail: hans.verbeeck@ugent.be
article id 41, category Research article
Ying Hou, Jintao Qu, Zukui Luo, Chao Zhang, Kaiyun Wang. (2011). Morphological mechanism of growth response in treeline species Minjiang fir to elevated CO2 and temperature. Silva Fennica vol. 45 no. 2 article id 41. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.41
Keywords: climate change; Abies faxoniana; crown architecture; leaf morphology; response ratio
Abstract | View details | Full text in PDF | Author Info
To test whether and how morphological traits are linked with growth responses of plants to temperature and CO2 is important for understanding the mechanism underlying how plant growth will respond to global warming. In this study, using closed-top chambers to mimic future elevated CO2 and temperature, the growth response, morphological traits of Minjiang fir (Abies faxoniana Rehd.et Wils.) and the relationship of the two were investigated after two years of exposure to the single and combined elevation of CO2 and temperature. The results showed that biomass of Minjiang fir was 21%, 31%, and 35% greater than the control in elevated CO2, elevated temperature and the combination of elevated CO2 and temperature treatments, respectively. Elevated CO2 and temperature significantly affected the morphology of Minjiang fir, and a few morphological traits were highly correlated with growth responses. Larger branch angles at the upper layer, crown volume, and relative crown length contributed to positive growth responses to elevated CO2, while decreased specific leaf area (SLA) constricted any further growth response. Leaf morphological traits were more closely correlated with the response ratio than crown did in the elevated temperature, while in the combination of elevated CO2 and temperature, crown was more correlated with the response ratio than the leaf morphological traits. Thus, our results indicate that morphological traits may contribute differently to growth responses under different experimental conditions.
  • Hou, Department of Life Sciences, Shangqiu Normal University, Shangqiu, China E-mail: yh@nn.cn
  • Qu, Department of Life Sciences, Shangqiu Normal University, Shangqiu, China E-mail: jq@nn.cn
  • Luo, School of Environment and Life Sciences, Kaili University, Kaili, China E-mail: zl@nn.cn
  • Zhang, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Urbanization and Ecological Restoration, East China Normal University, Shanghai, China, and University of Eastern Finland, School of Forest Sciences, Joensuu, Finland E-mail: cz@nn.cn
  • Wang, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Urbanization and Ecological Restoration, East China Normal University, Shanghai, China, and University of Eastern Finland, School of Forest Sciences, Joensuu, Finland E-mail: kywang@re.ecnu.edu.cn (email)

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