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Articles containing the keyword 'allometric equations'

Category: Research article

article id 10617, category Research article
Yao Anicet Gervais Kouamé, Mathieu Millan, Aya Brigitte N'Dri, Tristan Charles-Dominique, Marcel Konan, Adama Bakayoko, Jacques Gignoux. (2022). Multispecies allometric equations for shrubs and trees biomass prediction in a Guinean savanna (West Africa). Silva Fennica vol. 56 no. 2 article id 10617. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.10617
Keywords: carbon stocks; allometric equations; shrubs; trees; aboveground and belowground biomass; Guinean savannas
Highlights: New allometric equations were developed for predicting aboveground and belowground biomass (AGB and BGB) of trees and multi-stemmed shrubs in the Guinean savannas based on field measurements, providing information for West African mesic savannas and filling a critical knowledge gap; AGB and BGB of trees were better predicted from the quantity ρDb2H (with ρ the specific wood density in g cm–3, Db the stem basal diameter in cm, and H the tree height in m); Obtaining accurate estimates of AGB and BGB in multi-stemmed shrubs required additional consideration of the total number of stems; The root/shoot biomass ratio decreased with increasing of the stem size (measured by Db) for trees but remains relatively unchanged for shrubs.
Abstract | Full text in HTML | Full text in PDF | Author Info

Currently, tools to predict the aboveground and belowground biomass (AGB and BGB) of woody species in Guinean savannas (and the data to calibrate them) are still lacking. Multispecies allometric equations calibrated from direct measurements can provide accurate estimates of plant biomass in local ecosystems and can be used to extrapolate local estimates of carbon stocks to the biome scale. We developed multispecies models to estimate AGB and BGB of trees and multi-stemmed shrubs in a Guinean savanna of Côte d’Ivoire. The five dominant species of the area were included in the study. We sampled a total of 100 trees and 90 shrubs destructively by harvesting their biometric data (basal stem diameter Db, total stem height H, stump area SS, as well as total number of stems n for shrubs), and then measured their dry AGB and BGB. We fitted log-log linear models to predict AGB and BGB from the biometric measurements. The most relevant model for predicting AGB in trees was fitted as follows: AGB = 0.0471 (ρDb2H)0.915 (with AGB in kg and ρDb2H in g cm–1 m). This model had a bias of 19%, while a reference model for comparison (fitted from tree measurements in a similar savanna ecosystem, Ifo et al. 2018) overestimated the AGB of trees of our test savannas by 132%. The BGB of trees was also better predicted from ρDb2H as follows: BGB = 0.0125 (ρDb2H)0.6899 (BGB in kg and ρDb2H in g cm–1 m), with 6% bias, while the reference model had about 3% bias. In shrubs, AGB and BGB were better predicted from ρDb2H together with the total number of stems (n). The best fitted allometric equation for predicting AGB in shrubs was as follows: AGB = 0.0191 (ρDb2H)0.6227 n0.9271. This model had about 1.5% bias, while the reference model overestimated the AGB of shrubs of Lamto savannas by about 79%. The equation for predicting BGB of shrubs is: BGB = 0.0228 (ρDb2H)0.7205 n0.992 that overestimated the BGB of the shrubs of Lamto savannas with about 3% bias, while the reference model underestimated the BGB by about 14%. The reference model misses an important feature of fire-prone savannas, namely the strong imbalance of the BGB/AGB ratio between trees and multi-stemmed shrubs, which our models predict. The allometric equations we developed here are therefore relevant for C stocks inventories in trees and shrubs communities of Guinean savannas.

  • Kouamé, UFR Sciences de la Nature, UFR-SN/ Station d’Ecologie de Lamto (CRE), Pôle de recherche Environnement et Développement Durable, Université NANGUI ABROGOUA, 02 BP 801 Abidjan 02, Côte d’Ivoire); Institute of Ecology and Environmental Sciences IEES-Paris (Sorbonne Université, CNRS, Université Paris Diderot, IRD, UPEC, INRA), 4 Place Jussieu, 75005, Paris, France ORCID https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0847-2569 E-mail: kouameyag@gmail.com (email)
  • Millan, Centre for African Ecology, School of Animal, Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, Johannesburg, South Africa; Global Change Biology Group, Department of Botany and Zoology, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602, South Africa; Institute of Botany of the Czech Academy of Sciences, v.v.i, Dukelská 135, Třeboň, 379 01, Czech Republic ORCID https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0151-6055 E-mail: mathieu.millan@gmail.com
  • N'Dri, UFR Sciences de la Nature, UFR-SN/ Station d’Ecologie de Lamto (CRE), Pôle de recherche Environnement et Développement Durable, Université NANGUI ABROGOUA, 02 BP 801 Abidjan 02, Côte d’Ivoire ORCID https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6333-6279 E-mail: brigitte.aya@gmail.com
  • Charles-Dominique, Institute of Ecology and Environmental Sciences IEES-Paris (Sorbonne Université, CNRS, Université Paris Diderot, IRD, UPEC, INRA), 4 Place Jussieu, 75005, Paris, France ORCID https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5767-0406 E-mail: tristan.charles-dominique@sorbonne-universite.fr
  • Konan, UFR Sciences de la Nature, UFR-SN/ Station d’Ecologie de Lamto (CRE), Pôle de recherche Environnement et Développement Durable, Université NANGUI ABROGOUA, 02 BP 801 Abidjan 02, Côte d’Ivoire E-mail: marcelkonan.lamto@gmail.com
  • Bakayoko, UFR Sciences de la Nature, UFR-SN/ Station d’Ecologie de Lamto (CRE), Pôle de recherche Environnement et Développement Durable, Université NANGUI ABROGOUA, 02 BP 801 Abidjan 02, Côte d’Ivoire E-mail: bakadamaci@yahoo.fr
  • Gignoux, Institute of Ecology and Environmental Sciences IEES-Paris (Sorbonne Université, CNRS, Université Paris Diderot, IRD, UPEC, INRA), 4 Place Jussieu, 75005, Paris, France ORCID https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3853-9282 E-mail: jacques.gignoux@upmc.fr
article id 1474, category Research article
Cedric A. Goussanou, Sabin Guendehou, Achille E. Assogbadjo, Maguette Kaire, Brice Sinsin, Aida Cuni-Sanchez. (2016). Specific and generic stem biomass and volume models of tree species in a West African tropical semi-deciduous forest. Silva Fennica vol. 50 no. 2 article id 1474. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1474
Keywords: carbon stock; allometric equations; non-destructive sampling; basic wood density
Highlights: Non-destructive sampling approach applied to derive ground truth observations and generate robust basic wood densities; Species-specific and generic allometric equations; Specific equations have better predictive capabilities than generic models.
Abstract | Full text in HTML | Full text in PDF | Author Info

The quantification of the contribution of tropical forests to global carbon stocks and climate change mitigation requires availability of data and tools such as allometric equations. This study made available volume and biomass models for eighteen tree species in a semi-deciduous tropical forest in West Africa. Generic models were also developed for the forest ecosystem, and basic wood density determined for the tree species. Non-destructive sampling approach was carried out on five hundred and one sample trees to analyse stem volume and biomass. From the modelling of volume and biomass as functions of diameter at breast height (Dbh) and stem height, logarithmic models had better predictive capabilities. The model validation showed that in absence of data on height, models using Dbh only as variable was an alternative. The comparison of basic wood densities to data published in literature enabled to conclude that the non-destructive sampling was a good approach to determining reliable basic wood density. The comparative analysis of species-specific models in this study with selected generic models for tropical forests indicated low probability to identify effective generic models with good predictive ability for biomass. Given tree species richness of tropical forests, the study demonstrated the hypothesis that species-specific models are preferred to generic models, and concluded that further research should be oriented towards development of specific models to cover the full range of dominant tree species of African forests.

  • Goussanou, Laboratory of Applied Ecology, Faculty of Agronomic Sciences, University of Abomey-Calavi, 01 BP 526 Cotonou, Benin E-mail: cedricgoussanou@gmail.com (email)
  • Guendehou, Laboratory of Applied Ecology, Faculty of Agronomic Sciences, University of Abomey-Calavi, 01 BP 526 Cotonou, Benin; Benin Centre for Scientific and Technical Research, 03 BP 1665 Cotonou, Benin E-mail: sguendehou@yahoo.fr
  • Assogbadjo, Laboratory of Applied Ecology, Faculty of Agronomic Sciences, University of Abomey-Calavi, 01 BP 526 Cotonou, Benin E-mail: assogbadjo@yahoo.fr
  • Kaire, Centre Régional AGRHYMET, Département Formation et Recherche, BP 11011 Niamey, Niger E-mail: m.kaire@agrhymet.ne
  • Sinsin, Laboratory of Applied Ecology, Faculty of Agronomic Sciences, University of Abomey-Calavi, 01 BP 526 Cotonou, Benin E-mail: bsinsin@gmail.com
  • Cuni-Sanchez, University of Copenhagen, Center for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate, Nørregade 10, P.O. Box 2177, 1017 Copenhagen K, Denmark E-mail: aidacuni@hotmail.com
article id 963, category Research article
Szymon Bijak, Michał Zasada, Agnieszka Bronisz, Karol Bronisz, Maciej Czajkowski, Łukasz Ludwisiak, Robert Tomusiak, Rafał Wojtan. (2013). Estimating coarse roots biomass in young silver birch stands on post-agricultural lands in central Poland. Silva Fennica vol. 47 no. 2 article id 963. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.963
Keywords: abandoned farmland; belowground biomass; allometric equations; root-to-shoot ratio
Highlights: Age and size of the tree are the most important factors that influence the amount of belowground biomass; Allocation of the biomass to the coarse roots also depends on age and size of the tree
Abstract | Full text in HTML | Full text in PDF | Author Info
Study analyses coarse (d>2 mm of diameter) roots biomass dynamics in young succession stands of silver birch (Betula pendula Roth) growing on abandoned farmlands in central Poland. Research material based on 181 sample trees, which were gathered in 20 pure silver birch stands in 5 locations. The age of the trees varied from 1 to 16 years. Coarse roots biomass of the investigated trees ranged from 0.7 to 4305.5 g/tree (422.6 g/tree on average) showing great variability (coefficient of variation equals 185%). A clear dependence of belowground biomass on the age and size of a tree was observed. Root-to-shoot ratio values vary from 0.1 to 1.0 with evidence of a tendency to decrease with increasing age, diameter at the breast height and height of analysed trees. An allometric equation was elaborated for the estimation of belowground biomass based on height or diameter at breast height of young silver birches. The suitability of this formula should be considered for the estimation of biomass accumulation and carbon sequestration by young successional silver birch stands growing on abandoned agricultural lands.
  • Bijak, Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Faculty of Forestry, Laboratory of Dendrometry and Forest Productivity, Nowoursynowska 159, 02-776 Warszawa, Poland E-mail: szymon.bijak@wl.sggw.pl (email)
  • Zasada, Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Faculty of Forestry, Laboratory of Dendrometry and Forest Productivity, Nowoursynowska 159, 02-767 Warszawa, Poland E-mail: michal.zasada@wl.sggw.pl
  • Bronisz, Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Faculty of Forestry, Laboratory of Dendrometry and Forest Productivity, Warszawa, Poland E-mail: agnieszka.bronisz@wl.sggw.pl
  • Bronisz, Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Faculty of Forestry, Laboratory of Dendrometry and Forest Productivity, Warszawa, Poland E-mail: karol.bronisz@wl.sggw.pl
  • Czajkowski, Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Faculty of Forestry, Laboratory of Dendrometry and Forest Productivity, Warszawa, Poland E-mail: maciej.czajkowski@wl.sggw.pl
  • Ludwisiak, Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Faculty of Forestry, Laboratory of Dendrometry and Forest Productivity, Warszawa, Poland E-mail: lukasz.ludwisiak@wl.sggw.pl
  • Tomusiak, Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Faculty of Forestry, Laboratory of Dendrometry and Forest Productivity, Warszawa, Poland E-mail: robert.tomusiak@wl.sggw.pl
  • Wojtan, Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Faculty of Forestry, Laboratory of Dendrometry and Forest Productivity, Warszawa, Poland E-mail: rafal.wojtan@wl.sggw.pl
article id 520, category Research article
Rüdiger Grote. (2002). Foliage and branch biomass estimation of coniferous and deciduous tree species. Silva Fennica vol. 36 no. 4 article id 520. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.520
Keywords: Picea abies; Fagus sylvatica; biomass estimation; crown dimensions; allometric equations
Abstract | View details | Full text in PDF | Author Info
Under changing environmental conditions, biomass development on the tree and the stand level may differ from today, regardless if the induced change is due to a shift in the general climate properties or to forest management. Under these conditions, tree biomass can not be derived from tables based on former investigations but has to be defined from particular biomass investigations, which generally calculate tree and stand biomass from sample branches using allometric relationships. Therefore, sample measurements on harvested trees are needed. In this paper, foliage and branch biomass estimation for 6 Norway spruces (Picea abies) and 6 beeches (Fagus sylvatica) harvested in a 56-year-old mixed stand in southern Germany is presented. Different allometric models are investigated to derive branch biomass from branch dimension for both species. The equations that are based on branch length, foliated branch fraction, and branch diameter are used for tree and stand level estimates. However, the variation within the 6 trees of each species was too large for a reliable calculation of stand biomass, especially in case of beech branch wood. Furthermore, the necessity of allometric relations and their applicability in individual-tree models is discussed, and the importance of suitable branch- and tree selection is underlined.
  • Grote, TU München, Chair of Forest Yield Science, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising, Germany E-mail: ruediger.grote@lrz.tu-muenchen.de (email)

Category: Research note

article id 1275, category Research note
Arshad Ali, Ming-Shan Xu, Yan-Tao Zhao, Qing-Qing Zhang, Liu-Li Zhou, Xiao-Dong Yang, En-Rong Yan. (2015). Allometric biomass equations for shrub and small tree species in subtropical China. Silva Fennica vol. 49 no. 4 article id 1275. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1275
Keywords: aboveground biomass; allometric equations; carbon storage; biometric variables; shrubs; subtropical forests
Highlights: Diameter (D) and height (H) are strong predictors in species-specific and multispecies models for the aboveground biomass of subtropical shrubs and small trees; Although wet basic density and crown shape may improve the predictive power of aboveground biomass slightly, the labor intensive measurements for wet basic density and crown shape may be disregarded when a large number of individuals are to be surveyed; Our results extend the generality of D-H models for aboveground biomass for large trees to subtropical shrubs and small trees.
Abstract | Full text in HTML | Full text in PDF | Author Info

Species-specific allometric equations for shrubs and small trees are relatively scarce, thus limiting the precise quantification of aboveground biomass (AGB) in both shrubby vegetation and forests. Fourteen shrub and small tree species in Eastern China were selected to develop species-specific and multispecies allometric biomass equations. Biometric variables, including the diameter of the longest stem (D), height (H), wet basic density (BD), and crown area and shape were measured for each individual plant. We measured the AGB through a non-destructive method, and validated these measurements using the dry mass of the sampled plant components. The AGB was related to biometric variables using regression analysis. The species-specific allometric models, with D and H as predictors (D-H models) accounted for 70% to 99% of the variation in the AGB of shrubs and small trees. A multispecies allometric D-H model accounted for 71% of the variation in the AGB. Although BD, as an additional predictor, improved the fit of most models, the D-H models were adequate for predicting the AGB for shrubs and small trees in subtropical China without BD data.

  • Ali, School of Ecological and Environmental Sciences, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241, China; Tiantong National Forest Ecosystem Observations and Research Station, Ningbo 315114, Zhejiang, China; Department of Environmental Sciences, Abdul Wali Khan University Mardan, 23200, KPK, Pakistan E-mail: arshadforester@gmail.com
  • Xu, School of Ecological and Environmental Sciences, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241, China; Tiantong National Forest Ecosystem Observations and Research Station, Ningbo 315114, Zhejiang, China E-mail: yumsh09@lzu.edu.cn
  • Zhao, School of Ecological and Environmental Sciences, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241, China; Tiantong National Forest Ecosystem Observations and Research Station, Ningbo 315114, Zhejiang, China E-mail: zhaoyantao1991@163.com
  • Zhang, School of Ecological and Environmental Sciences, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241, China; Tiantong National Forest Ecosystem Observations and Research Station, Ningbo 315114, Zhejiang, China E-mail: qingzq@yeah.net
  • Zhou, School of Ecological and Environmental Sciences, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241, China; Tiantong National Forest Ecosystem Observations and Research Station, Ningbo 315114, Zhejiang, China E-mail: 792920738@qq.com
  • Yang, School of Ecological and Environmental Sciences, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241, China; Tiantong National Forest Ecosystem Observations and Research Station, Ningbo 315114, Zhejiang, China E-mail: xjyangxd@sina.com
  • Yan, School of Ecological and Environmental Sciences, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241, China; Tiantong National Forest Ecosystem Observations and Research Station, Ningbo 315114, Zhejiang, China E-mail: eryan@des.ecnu.edu.cn (email)

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