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Articles containing the keyword 'terrestrial'

Category: Research article

article id 10269, category Research article
Annika Kangas, Helena M. Henttonen, Timo P. Pitkänen, Sakari Sarkkola, Juha Heikkinen. (2020). Re-calibrating stem volume models – is there change in the tree trunk form from the 1970s to the 2010s in Finland? Silva Fennica vol. 54 no. 4 article id 10269. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.10269
Keywords: TLS; OLS; regression; terrestrial laser scanning
Highlights: TLS data showed that trunk form has changed in Finland from the 1970s; Significant differences were observed for all tree species; The trees in TLS data are on average more slender than in the old data.
Abstract | Full text in HTML | Full text in PDF | Author Info

The tree stem volume models of Norway spruce, Scots pine and silver and downy birch currently used in Finland are based on data collected during 1968–1972. These models include four different formulations of a volume model, with three different combinations of independent variables: 1) diameter at height of 1.3 m above ground (dbh), 2) dbh and tree height (h) and 3) dbh, h and upper diameter at height of 6 m (d6). In recent National Forest Inventories of Finland, a difference in the mean volume prediction between the models with and without the upper diameter as predictor has been observed. To analyze the causes of this difference, terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) was used to acquire a large dataset in Finland during 2017–2018. Field-measured predictors and volumes predicted using spline functions fitted to the TLS data were used to re-calibrate the current volume models. The trunk form is different in these two datasets. The form height is larger in the new data for all diameter classes, which indicates that the tree trunks are more slender than they used to be. One probable reason for this change is the increase in stand densities, which is at least partly due to changed forest management. In models with both dbh and h as predictors, the volume is smaller a given h class in the data new data than in the old data, and vice versa for the diameter classes. The differences between the old and new models were largest with pine and smallest with birch.

  • Kangas, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Yliopistokatu 6 B, FI-80100 Joensuu, Finland ORCID https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8637-5668 E-mail: annika.kangas@luke.fi (email)
  • Henttonen, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Latokartanonkaari 9, FI-00790 Helsinki, Finland E-mail: helena.henttonen@luke.fi
  • Pitkänen, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Latokartanonkaari 9, FI-00790 Helsinki, Finland ORCID https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5389-8713 E-mail: timo.p.pitkanen@luke.fi
  • Sarkkola, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Latokartanonkaari 9, FI-00790 Helsinki, Finland E-mail: sakari.sarkkola@luke.fi
  • Heikkinen, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Latokartanonkaari 9, FI-00790 Helsinki, Finland ORCID https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3527-774X E-mail: juha.heikkinen@luke.fi
article id 1413, category Research article
Ilya Potapov, Marko Järvenpää, Markku Åkerblom, Pasi Raumonen, Mikko Kaasalainen. (2015). Data-based stochastic modeling of tree growth and structure formation. Silva Fennica vol. 50 no. 1 article id 1413. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1413
Keywords: terrestrial lidar; form diversity; morphological plasticity; stochastic functional-structural plant model; quantitative structure models; data fitting
Highlights: We propose a stochastic version of the tree growth model LIGNUM for producing tree structures consistent with detailed terrestrial laser scanning data, and we provide the proof-of-concept by using model-based simulations and real laser scanning data; Trees produced with the data-based model resemble the trees of the dataset, and are statistically similar but not copies of each other; the number of such synthetic trees is not limited.
Abstract | Full text in HTML | Full text in PDF | Author Info

We introduce a general procedure to match a stochastic functional-structural tree model (here LIGNUM augmented with stochastic rules) with real tree structures depicted by quantitative structure models (QSMs) based on terrestrial laser scanning. The matching is done by iteratively finding the maximum correspondence between the measured tree structure and the stochastic choices of the algorithm. First, we analyze the match to synthetic data (generated by the model itself), where the target values of the parameters to be estimated are known in advance, and show that the algorithm converges properly. We then carry out the procedure on real data obtaining a realistic model. We thus conclude that the proposed stochastic structure model (SSM) approach is a viable solution for formulating realistic plant models based on data and accounting for the stochastic influences.

  • Potapov, Tampere University of Technology, Department of Mathematics, P.O. Box 553, FI-33101 Tampere, Finland E-mail: ilya.potapov@tut.fi (email)
  • Järvenpää, Tampere University of Technology, Department of Mathematics, P.O. Box 553, FI-33101 Tampere, Finland E-mail: marko.jarvenpaa@tut.fi
  • Åkerblom, Tampere University of Technology, Department of Mathematics, P.O. Box 553, FI-33101 Tampere, Finland E-mail: markku.akerblom@tut.fi
  • Raumonen, Tampere University of Technology, Department of Mathematics, P.O. Box 553, FI-33101 Tampere, Finland E-mail: pasi.raumonen@tut.fi
  • Kaasalainen, Tampere University of Technology, Department of Mathematics, P.O. Box 553, FI-33101 Tampere, Finland E-mail: mikko.kaasalainen@tut.fi
article id 1071, category Research article
Ursula Kretschmer, Nadeschda Kirchner, Christopher Morhart, Heinrich Spiecker. (2013). A new approach to assessing tree stem quality characteristics using terrestrial laser scans. Silva Fennica vol. 47 no. 5 article id 1071. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1071
Keywords: LIDAR; terrestrial laser scanner; tree stem quality assessment; cylinder approximation; bark defects
Highlights: Minimal deviations of the bark surface can be detected and visualized based on terrestrial laser scan data; Additionally the geometrical properties of bark scars and branched knots can be assessed; Two methods using two different approaches are presented: (1) a method using intensity data and (2) a method using bark surface models.
Abstract | Full text in HTML | Full text in PDF | Author Info
This paper presents an approach to assess and measure bark characteristics as indicators of wood quality using terrestrial laser scan data. In addition to the detection and measurement by use of the intensity information of the scan data a new approach was established. Bark surface models are calculated for each tree. They offer the representation of the bark as a height model. The reference is the tree stem approximated by a chain of cylinders. Minimal deviations of the bark surface can be detected and visualized and the geometrical properties of bark scars and branched knots can be assessed. Results of the measurement of 18 scars are presented using the two approaches: (1) a method using intensity data or (2) using bark surface models. The selection of the adequate approach depends on the stem characteristics. In a next step, methods for automatic measurement of bark scars will be developed.
  • Kretschmer, Chair of Forest Growth, Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Tennenbacher Str. 4, 79106 Freiburg, Germany E-mail: ursula.kretschmer@iww.uni-freiburg.de (email)
  • Kirchner, VOLKE Consulting Engineers GmbH, Schätzweg 7-9, 80935 München, Germany E-mail: nadeschda.kirchner@volke.muc.de
  • Morhart, Chair of Forest Growth, Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Tennenbacher Str. 4, 79106 Freiburg, Germany E-mail: christopher.morhart@iww.uni-freiburg.de
  • Spiecker, Chair of Forest Growth, Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Tennenbacher Str. 4, 79106 Freiburg, Germany E-mail: instww@uni-freiburg.de
article id 495, category Research article
Christopher Dean. (2003). Calculation of wood volume and stem taper using terrestrial single-image close-range photogrammetry and contemporary software tools. Silva Fennica vol. 37 no. 3 article id 495. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.495
Keywords: biomass; branches; terrestrial; photography; rectification; volume; taper
Abstract | View details | Full text in PDF | Author Info
A method of estimating trunk and branch volumes of single trees is presented that uses a combination of elementary field measurements, terrestrial photography, image rectification and on-screen digitising using commercial software packages and automated volume calculation. The method is applicable to a variety of different sized trees in situations where the trunks are clearly visible. Results for taper measurement and wood volume calculation are presented for Eucalyptus regnans F. von Muell., Sequoiadendron giganteum (Lindley) Buchholz and Quercus robur L. Branch allometrics are provided for E. regnans. The largest errors arose from field observations. If the trees are asymmetrical in cross-section (e.g. due to irregular buttressing or forked stems), or if there is no vantage point perpendicular to the direction of lean, then photographs from more than one side are recommended. Accuracy and precision of geometric reproduction by the image rectification process, and the volume calculation, were tested using mathematically generated tree components. The errors in the branch volumes of the virtual tree showed complex trends due to interacting factors. Volumes were underestimated by an average 0.5% for stems and 4% for branches. Due to the area deficit resulting from non-circular cross-sections of the buttress, overestimation of stem volumes could be as high as 10% on average for mature trees. However, the area deficit was known for E. regnans and incorporated into the volume calculation. The underestimation of volumes would help counteract over-estimation due to the area deficit. The application of this method to carbon accounting in forests and woodlands is explained.
  • Dean, CRC for Greenhouse Accounting, The Australian National University, GPO Box 475, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia E-mail: cdean@rsbs.anu.edu.au (email)

Category: Research note

article id 10533, category Research note
Daniel Schraik, Aarne Hovi, Miina Rautiainen. (2021). Estimating cover fraction from TLS return intensity in coniferous and broadleaved tree shoots. Silva Fennica vol. 55 no. 4 article id 10533. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.10533
Keywords: terrestrial laser scanning; leaf area; lidar intensity; physically-based; voxel
Highlights: We developed a method to obtain the fraction of TLS pulses’ footprint area covered by a target’s projection area; We tested our method with shoots of Norway spruce, Scots pine and silver birch; We provide a physically-based framework related to unmeasured variables, and provide a robust statistical framework to deal with uncertainty.
Abstract | Full text in HTML | Full text in PDF | Author Info

Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) provides a unique opportunity to study forest canopy structure and its spatial patterns such as foliage quantity and dispersal. Using TLS point clouds for estimating leaf area density with voxel-based methods is biased by the physical dimensions of laser beams, which violates the common assumption of beams being infinitely thin. Real laser beams have a footprint size larger than several millimeters. This leads to difficulties in estimating leaf area density from light detection and ranging (LiDAR) in vegetation, where the target objects can be of similar or even smaller size than the beam footprint. To compensate for this bias, we propose a method to estimate the per-pulse cover fraction, defined as the fraction of laser beams’ footprint area that is covered by vegetation targets, using the LiDAR return intensity and an experimental calibration measurement. We applied this method to a Leica P40 single-return instrument, and report our experimental results. We found that conifer foliage had a lower average per-pulse cover fraction than broadleaved foliage, indicating an increased number of partial hits in conifer foliage. We further discuss limitations of our method that stem from unknown target properties that influence the LiDAR return intensity and highlight potential ways to overcome the limitations and manage the remaining uncertainty. Our method’s output, the per-beam cover fraction, may be useful in a weight function for methods that estimate leaf area density from LiDAR point clouds.

  • Schraik, Aalto University, School of Engineering, Department of Built Environment, P.O. Box 14100, FI-00076 Aalto, Finland; ORCID https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7794-3918 E-mail: daniel.schraik@aalto.fi (email)
  • Hovi, Aalto University, School of Engineering, Department of Built Environment, P.O. Box 14100, FI-00076 Aalto, Finland; ORCID https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4384-5279 E-mail: aarne.hovi@aalto.fi
  • Rautiainen, Aalto University, School of Engineering, Department of Built Environment, P.O. Box 14100, FI-00076 Aalto, Finland; Aalto University, School of Electrical Engineering, Department of Electronics and Nanoengineering, P.O. Box 14100, FI-00076 Aalto, Finland ORCID https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6568-3258 E-mail: miina.a.rautiainen@aalto.fi
article id 1125, category Research note
Anssi Krooks, Sanna Kaasalainen, Ville Kankare, Marianna Joensuu, Pasi Raumonen, Mikko Kaasalainen. (2014). Predicting tree structure from tree height using terrestrial laser scanning and quantitative structure models. Silva Fennica vol. 48 no. 2 article id 1125. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1125
Keywords: remote sensing; terrestrial lidar; tree modelling; branch size distribution
Highlights: The analysis of tree structure suggests that trees of different height growing in similar conditions have similar branch size distributions; There is potential for using the tree height information in large-scale estimations of forest canopy structure.
Abstract | Full text in HTML | Full text in PDF | Author Info
We apply quantitative structure modelling to produce detailed information on branch-level metrics in trees. Particularly we are interested in the branch size distribution, by which we mean the total volume of branch parts distributed over the diameter classes of the parts. We investigate the possibility of predicting tree branch size distributions for trees in similar growing conditions. The quantitative structure model enables for the first time the comparisons of structure between a large number of trees. We found that the branch size distribution is similar for trees of different height in similar growing conditions. The results suggest that tree height could be used to estimate branch size distribution in areas with similar growing conditions and topography.
  • Krooks, Finnish Geodetic Institute, Geodeetinrinne 2, FI–02431 Masala, Finland E-mail: Anssi.Krooks@fgi.fi
  • Kaasalainen, Finnish Geodetic Institute, Geodeetinrinne 2, FI–02431 Masala, Finland E-mail: Sanna.Kaasalainen@fgi.fi (email)
  • Kankare, Department of Forest Sciences, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 27, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland E-mail: ville.kankare@helsinki.fi
  • Joensuu, Department of Forest Sciences, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 27, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland E-mail: marianna.joensuu@alumni.helsinki.fi
  • Raumonen, Tampere University of Technology, Department of Mathematics, P.O. Box 553, Tampere, FI-33101, Finland E-mail: Pasi.Raumonen@tut.fi
  • Kaasalainen, Tampere University of Technology, Department of Mathematics, P.O. Box 553, Tampere, FI-33101, Finland E-mail: Mikko.Kaasalainen@tut.fi

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